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Encryption Math The Almighty Buck United Kingdom

Turing Manuscript Sells For $1 Million 44

itwbennett writes A 56-page notebook manuscript by Alan Turing, the English mathematician considered to be the father of modern computer science, was sold at auction Monday for $1.025 million. Turing apparently wrote in the notebook in 1942 when he was working in Bletchley Park, England, trying to break German military code. “It gives us insight into how Alan Turing tackles problems. Sadly it shows us what he never got to finish,” said Cassandra Hatton, senior specialist at Bonhams.
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Turing Manuscript Sells For $1 Million

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 13, 2015 @05:10PM (#49466167)

    n/t

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Recent Hollywood movie inflates auction price of notebook

  • million here/million there...after a while, we're talking about REAL money.
    • There is no such thing as "real" money there never was.
      • There is no such thing as "real" money there never was.

        Not even BitCoin is real? Oh man, it's not even a currency! (sob)

        • All currencies are virtual. Their value is not real but implied. Even gold.

          Gold was valuable because lots of people said it was - just like money.
  • Should have sold for $1.048576 million
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Different Headline: "Seventy year old manuscript written by mathematician who died 60 years ago is still under copyright in many countries."

    • Different Headline: "Seventy year old manuscript written by mathematician who died 60 years ago is still under copyright in many countries."

      The owner of the manuscript is under no obligation to publish it. No obligation to display it.

      The expiration of copyright does nothing to guarantee access to primary sources, does nothing to guarantee funding for the preservation of primary sources.

      • Mein Kampf goes out of copyright in 16 days, I believe.

      • Moreover, copyright timer starts ticking from the first publication date!

        If you discover an unknown script by DaVinci that was hidden in a wall and never shown to the public, it will be copyrighted starting the moment it's published first!

  • Museums? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Sarius64 ( 880298 ) on Monday April 13, 2015 @07:18PM (#49466847)
    I find it sad that this history for the world might be buried in some collector's safe instead of in a museum where our world society should be able to appreciate its significance.
    • I find it sad that this history for the world might be buried in some collector's safe instead of in a museum where our world society should be able to appreciate its significance.

      For stuff like manuscripts, museums are pretty much obsolete. What matters is what's on the paper, not the paper itself, so a hi-res picture is just as good, and a plain-text searchable copy is even better.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        For stuff like manuscripts, museums are pretty much obsolete. What matters is what's on the paper, not the paper itself, so a hi-res picture is just as good, and a plain-text searchable copy is even better.

        Except in a museum, there's a good chance it's available for public viewing. In a private collector's hands, unless they're philanthropic, it'll likely be locked away in a drawer never to see the light of day again. And the public will never get a chance to see it either.

        Oh yeah, no collector will want to

        • No, it won't - not in a museum behind a glass case. So, worst-case scenario is "same diff." And if copyright has expired, there's no problem with anyone who has a copy of the text to post it.
      • How does one get access to a private manuscript someone just paid a million dollars for so as to copy it and deflate its collectible value? Hope for philanthropic owners seems a stretch. But I do agree with somehow get a digitization for the world's history.
        • I guess you didn't read the article. There's a picture from one of the pages of the manuscript, and the handwriting is terrible. Or this:

          Turing left all his papers, including the notebook, to his friend and fellow mathematician Robin Gandy. Gandy turned Turing’s dream journals over to a psychiatrist, who burned them, and gave Turing’s scientific papers to Kings College. Gandy however kept this one notebook because in the middle of it, in some blank pages, he wrote his own private journal.

          Gandy died in 1995, and the current owner of the manuscript was not disclosed by the auction house.

          You can be sure that in the 20 years preceding putting it up for auction, it was either photographed or photocopied, or more likely, both.

          • How could reading the article change reality? If the private owner doesn't digitize it your assumption is still an assumption without evidence.
            • How could reading the article change reality? If the private owner doesn't digitize it your assumption is still an assumption without evidence.

              The reality is that the books pages are already photographed, which you would have seen if you had RTFA, but that's okay, keep arguing for no purpose. Museums are fast becoming mausoleums anyway.

              • Do you even read what you write?

                You can be sure that in the 20 years preceding putting it up for auction, it was either photographed or photocopied, or more likely, both.

                How does that convey that it occurred? RTFA or not, you're just being an ass for effect. I read the article again and it doesn't reflect what you wish. There's one photo of one page with no intention for more to be digitized. Maybe you can take the Zantac before making things up in the next post.

                • So, you're assuming that the people who held this for 20 years were complete dummies who went to the trouble of setting up to take pictures and only took a picture of one page. Hardly realistic or reasonable, if only so that they could have it authenticated without having to ship the original out.

                  To put it into a nerd context, if you had an Action Comics #1 or Superman #1 and someone wanted to see if it was intact, you wouldn't sent it to them or any other grading service - you'd send them pictures of the

    • I was just writing a similar comment but decided against it due to the digitization issue. However, the same concern applies to non-manuscript objects like the fully-functional Enigma machine that was also sold in the auction. Such a device would be better served in a museum or at least a publicly accessible place where people can be inspired by it - both by the technical achievements required to produce it, as well as the efforts that went into taking down the regime that employed it. Locking away the her

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