Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Earth Science

Persian Gulf Temperatures May Be At the Edge of Human Tolerance In 30 Years (arstechnica.com) 488

An anonymous reader writes: According to a new climate study the Persian Gulf may become so hot and humid in the next 30 years that it will reach the threshold of human survivability. Ars reports: "Existing climate models have shown that a global temperature increase to the threshold of human survivability would be reached in some regions of the globe at a point in the distant future. However, a new paper published by Jeremy Pal and Elfatih Eltahir in Nature Climate Change presents evidence that this deadly combination of heat and humidity increases could occur in the Persian Gulf much earlier than previously anticipated."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Persian Gulf Temperatures May Be At the Edge of Human Tolerance In 30 Years

Comments Filter:
  • So what? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Dunbal ( 464142 ) * on Monday November 09, 2015 @06:47AM (#50891593)
    It doesn't matter. By this time the entire population of the middle east will have "moved" to Europe.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 09, 2015 @06:48AM (#50891599)

    Make sh*tloads of money selling fossil fuels to the rest of the world...
    Parlay that money, and valuable commodity, into unwarranted global influence...
    Have homeland rendered uninhabitable by the consequence of burning said fossil fuels...

  • Interesting result (Score:5, Insightful)

    by burtosis ( 1124179 ) on Monday November 09, 2015 @07:48AM (#50891729)
    Its difficult to explain anything to people that can't be summed up into one sentence or a short five sentence anectdotal story.

    That said the basic thermodynamics of added CO2 and other heat trapping gasses is simple, well understood, and was settled long ago academically. The real cutting edge research today is determining what will happen on a regional scale. In the above study published in Nature, it's not an increase in temperature so much as its an increase in regional moisture brought on by a slight warming and a shift in climate.
    It's not a dust bowl effect, think of how bad that dry heat is going to be if it turns high humidity.
    While results like these could be more accurately modeled, say by having better satellites, far more money is spent arguing than buying hardware and funding research. The possible doomsday scenerio isn't a whole planet that's too hot - its far more likely a slightly insane nuclear arms bearing nation essentially being locked inside a car with the windows rolled up in a Flordia kmart parking lot in July.
  • FTA

    We consider both dry-bulb temperature (T) and wet-bulb temperature (TW), specifically their daily maxima averaged over 6 h, denoted by Tmax and TWmax, respectively. Whereas the general public can easily relate to the concept of T, TW is not a widely used and understood concept. It is the temperature an air parcel would attain if cooled at constant pressure by evaporating water within it until saturation. It is a combined measure of temperature and humidity, or âmugginessâ(TM). Like all living s

  • by geekmux ( 1040042 ) on Monday November 09, 2015 @08:41AM (#50891889)

    " "Existing climate models have shown that a global temperature increase to the threshold of human survivability would be reached in some regions of the globe at a point in the distant future..."

    This is somehow different than the many areas on the planet where humans should not be trying to live today?

  • by ThatsNotPudding ( 1045640 ) on Monday November 09, 2015 @09:09AM (#50891987)
    Oh, how they laughed when I filed a patent for a Stillsuit!
  • and Australia and Antarctica. Brazil?
  • by RogueWarrior65 ( 678876 ) on Monday November 09, 2015 @11:12AM (#50892733)

    As of this writing, only 6 of 210 postings were at level 5 which just goes to show how pointlessly contentious this topic is. Maybe the Slashdot editors should think about a moratorium on climate topics for a while.

    • by tehcyder ( 746570 ) on Tuesday November 10, 2015 @10:05AM (#50900233) Journal

      As of this writing, only 6 of 210 postings were at level 5 which just goes to show how pointlessly contentious this topic is. Maybe the Slashdot editors should think about a moratorium on climate topics for a while.

      It's only really a contentious topic amongst extreme right wingers in the US, who are of course well represented on slashdot. In most of the rest of the civilised world, even conservatives generally accept that climate change is a reality.

Are we running light with overbyte?

Working...