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China Earth Science

Chinese Zoo Animals Monitored For Earthquake Prediction 29

An anonymous reader writes: Seismologists in Nanjing have set up seven observation centers at zoos and animal parks in the region to see if animals can predict when an earthquake may strike. At least three kinds of animals in the earthquake stations should corroborate each other when bizarre behavior occurs, said Zhao Bing, head of Nanjing earthquake monitoring. Discovery reports: "According to one English-language Chinese news outlet, 'At Banqiao ecological park the behavior of around 200 pigs, 2,000 chickens, and fish in a 15-hectare pond are closely monitored to detect signals of an earthquake. Breeders here create daily reports regarding animal behavior for Nanjing's seismological departments.' The news report noted that the park relies 'mainly on employees closely watching the animals' for seismological significance."
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Chinese Zoo Animals Monitored For Earthquake Prediction

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  • In many countries, people are reluctant to evict spiders from houses, because the spontaneous fleeing of spiders is supposed to to forecast an incoming earthquake. The webbing allegedly acts as a seismic antenna. Frogs and birds also exhibit confused or agitated behaviour previous to earthquakes, birds allegedly due to their sensitivity to geo-magnetism, used in their navigation skills. These signs are however, rather sybillic and only become obvious ex-post facto.

    Thus, close monitoring of the Animal Kingdo

  • The news report noted that the park relies 'mainly on employees closely watching the animals' for seismological significance."

    How do they know what is significant? I assume that after earthquakes in the past some zoo employee reported that he/she saw the animals behaving strangely but didn't realize they were trying to tell him an earthquake was imminent. This in the country that uses rhinoceros horns and bear gall bladders as aphrodisiacs.

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      How do they know what is significant? I assume that after earthquakes in the past some zoo employee reported that he/she saw the animals behaving strangely but didn't realize they were trying to tell him an earthquake was imminent. This in the country that uses rhinoceros horns and bear gall bladders as aphrodisiacs.

      Well, that's why you do ... research!

      The hypothesis is "animals can predict earthquakes and we can detect it because they behaved 'funny'". Well, we need to find out what 'funny' is. So you're g

  • If nothing else it would be interesting to see the time data between different animals reactions. But I doubt any animal would give sufficient warning before the event took place. I would like to see a movie where a goat was tied to a stake and monitored by scientists 24/7 for earthquake monitoring.. and then it gets eaten by a T-Rex
  • I'm assuming those 2,000 chickens are for feeding to carnivores and not part of the exhibit. Chickens, pigs and fish... Oh my!

  • by peter303 ( 12292 ) on Monday July 06, 2015 @10:13AM (#50053843)
    China predicted a couple of significant quakes supposedly based on animal observations in the ealry 1970s. Then they missed the largest Chinese quake in decades in Tianjin, near Beijing, in 1976. Strange animal behavior has part of Chinese peasant folklore for millennia. Various US groups tried to replicate this methodology since the 1970s without much success. A geologist in San Jose counted lost pet ads and claimed some success. But his prediction windows were so wide they were not statistically significant. Perhaps 21st century social media could help gather observations.
  • Wouldn't it be cheaper to monitor soggy tea leaves instead?

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