Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Medicine Biotech The Military United States Build Technology

US Military Working On 3D Printing Exact Replicas of Bones & Limbs 80

ErnieKey writes The U.S. military is working with technology that will allow them to create exact virtual replicas of their soldiers. In case of an injury, these replicas could be used to 3D print exact medical models for rebuilding the injured patient's body and even exact replica implants. Could we all one day soon have virtual backups of ourselves that we can access and have new body parts 3D printed on demand?
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

US Military Working On 3D Printing Exact Replicas of Bones & Limbs

Comments Filter:
  • by rossdee ( 243626 ) on Sunday February 15, 2015 @12:51PM (#49060331)

    It will look so much like the real McCoy, they will be able to use it in the next Star Trek film

    • It will look so much like the real McCoy, they will be able to use it in the next Star Trek film

      I'm thinking that they are researching another type of "Bone", that some males experience in dreams or in the morning in Mom's basement.

      I was always suspicious over that children's song, where they sang "Give a dog a bone!"

      "I'm a doctor, Jim, not a bestiality fetishist!"

  • Bones and hard tissues = easy. Vessels, nerves, supporting tissue = nigh impossible. If technology ever got to the point where we could do this, we wouldn't be using soldiers to do our fighting.
    • by gweihir ( 88907 )

      Exactly. And you cannot just rip out a bone and put in another one either. All the other stuff needs to be attached and put into it.

      • So we just outsource surgeon jobs to the 5th dimension? Problem solved, and we can probably make a pretty penny in the process.

      • Sure other stuff needs to be attached. But this isn't an issue. Bone replacement is a routine everyday operation.

        • Not on the scale that these people are envisioning. What is being replaced now are joints - with great care to avoid damaging muscles, tendons and nerves. There are limited bone grafts done, you typically make a metal scaffold and stuff bits of hip bone in there and there are some more advanced scaffolding technologies being worked on. None of these require detailed anatomical models of the patient.

          There are replacements for skull parts being made by 3D printing but that can be done using a generic head

  • by See Attached ( 1269764 ) on Sunday February 15, 2015 @01:10PM (#49060439)
    Have seen a few cranial reconstruction implants made from MRI/CT to replace cranial defects from trauma and cancer etc. Amazing technology for sure. Beats the alternative by a huge margin. Doing a MRI of a soldiers body at induction might be a good resource when bad things happen? We need to stand behind our soldiers that go into harms way, in the many ways ...
    • by matfud ( 464184 )

      Also think of reducing the health care costs of older or retired soldiers. Hip/knee/shoulder replacements. They do not have to have been blown up of shot or anything violent.

  • by PPH ( 736903 ) on Sunday February 15, 2015 @01:12PM (#49060463)

    The Island [imdb.com]

    Someone keeps swiping all the Scarlett Johansson spare parts to build their own copy.

  • ...cause that technology is about as magical as this silly notion:

    >> Could we all one day soon have virtual backups of ourselves that we can access and have new body parts 3D printed on demand?

  • Huh. Priorities? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by rogoshen1 ( 2922505 ) on Sunday February 15, 2015 @01:51PM (#49060665)

    Is this the same military which decided that armor was too expensive for humvee's, and that body armor was too expensive for soldiers?

    (It's a great idea, I just wonder how they'd ever pull it off.. an ounce of Kevlar is apparently NOT cheaper than a pound of 3d printed skeleton.)

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You do know that those things happened during a time when congress was proposing cutting their budget right?

      1. Funding is threatened by congress
      2. Don't give troops what they need, blame expense
      3. Constituents get mad at congress
      4. Budget is not just maintained, but increased

      profit addendum
      3a. Brass invests in military contractors
      4a. Profit goes to mil-industry complex

    • "Is this the same military which decided that armor was too expensive for humvee's, and that body armor was too expensive for soldiers?"

      This method will print the kevlar right onto the body parts.

    • I was in the Army back in the 80's when the first Humvees were being rolled out and they offer way better protection than the hold Jeep's and CUCV M1009s (essentially a tricked out Chevy K5 Blazer) that they replaced. They were designed for different a battlefield than the one we fought on in Iraq and Afghanistan, a battlefield were the threats were much more potent and a few pounds of Kevlar underbody armor was not going to make a bit of difference.

      The Army _should_ have acted more quickly to upgrade or r

    • Armor for Humvees means they use a certain deal more fuel, all the time. Regardless where they are, what they do. So yes, that might be really expensive.

      Body armor is nice in movies (and nice in case it safes your life), otherwise it is overrated. No body armor makes you survive a direct hit of an modern infantry weapon, a grenade or a mojour explosion by anything.

      It only helps you butchering third world peons in places where you had no business anyway.

  • Why would the US want to build a skeleton army?

  • http://thedriftwars.com/

  • If you reconstruct a soldier, replacing every body part one by one until all body parts have been replaced, is it still the original soldier?

Somebody ought to cross ball point pens with coat hangers so that the pens will multiply instead of disappear.

Working...