Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Medicine

Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated? 673

HughPickens.com writes According to Joanna Rothkopf Disneyland is already a huge petri dish of disease with tired children wiping their snot faces on Goofy and then riding log flumes through mechanized rivers filled with the backwash of thousands of other sweaty, unwashed, weeping toddlers. Now John Tozzi reports at Businessweek that five workers at Disneyland have been diagnosed with measles in an outbreak that California officials trace to visitors at the theme park in mid-December. The measles outbreak is a publicity nightmare for Disney and the company is urging its 27,000 workers at the park to verify that they're inoculated against the virus, and the company is offering tests and shots on site for workers who are unvaccinated. One thing Disney won't do, however, is require workers to get routine vaccinations as a condition of employment. Almost no companies outside the health-care industry do. "To make things mandatory just raises a lot of legal concerns and legal issues," says Rob Niccolini. Disney has been working with public health officials, and they've already put some employees on paid leave until medically cleared. "They recognized that they were just a meeting place for measles," says Gilberto Chávez. "And they are quite concerned about doing what they can to help control the outbreak."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

Comments Filter:
  • its a tough subject (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ganjadude ( 952775 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:09AM (#48883341) Homepage
    because I am not anti vax, but i am pro choice. in that people should be free to do as they wish with their own bodies

    on the other hand, I do believe that an employer can mandate a safe working environment. I think the issue is not should they be forced to be vaccinated, but to what extent. For example, im not a flue shot kinda guy, i just dont get those. on the other hand, I got all my childhood vaccine, as well as a lyme vaccine in my teens (major tick area and my aunt got lyme)
    • by Mr D from 63 ( 3395377 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:13AM (#48883351)
      Employers should not be put in a position where they are giving medical advice or direction. If there is a reason that large, public centered facilities or parks should have required vaccinations, then that needs to be public policy, not corporate policy.
      • Disney is a government. They have their own police force and governing body controlling the surrounding municipal area.
      • by sjbe ( 173966 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @10:06AM (#48883901)

        Employers should not be put in a position where they are giving medical advice or direction. If there is a reason that large, public centered facilities or parks should have required vaccinations, then that needs to be public policy, not corporate policy.

        Hospitals require testing and proof of vaccination as a condition of employment. I've worked in one in the past and they wanted proof of certain vaccinations, a TB test, and provided any needed vaccinations free of charge. (I got a booster for MMR and tetanus) I think if a place like a hospital it would be insane not to require the employees to be reasonably secure against likely communicable diseases. At a place like Disney where they have to deal with the general public I wouldn't have a problem with public health policy mandating vaccination as a condition of employment. I don't think people should be forced to accept a vaccine if they are adults and really don't want to (and of course if they cannot due to allergies etc) but I have no problem with certain jobs being closed to them if they are not vaccinated. I think all children should be vaccinated or have proof that they cannot safely be vaccinated before attending any public school.

      • by msauve ( 701917 )
        "Employers should not be put in a position where they are giving medical advice or direction. "

        So, Disney shouldn't even be quarantining those employees with measles?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by msauve ( 701917 )
      No one would be forced to get a vaccination, and everyone has a choice. It would be a condition of employment, anyone would be free to quit if they chose not to get vaccinated.
      • by bickerdyke ( 670000 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:20AM (#48883399)

        Rule of thumb: It's not a free choice, if there is a big "or else...." attached.

        • by JBMcB ( 73720 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:26AM (#48883459)

          Absolutely it is. Your have freedom to live your life as you choose. If you are forcing others to accommodate your choices, now you're infringing on THEIR rights.

        • by sjbe ( 173966 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @10:10AM (#48883949)

          Rule of thumb: It's not a free choice, if there is a big "or else...." attached.

          Free choice does not mean choice without consequences. I am free to speak my mind but that does not mean I shouldn't expect consequences for doing so. I can choose not to vaccinate my children or myself but that doesn't mean I should be allowed to endanger other people by making that choice. I can choose not to be tested for drugs for philosophical reasons but that might mean that certain jobs are closed to me.

          Choice almost never comes without consequence.

    • by blind biker ( 1066130 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:16AM (#48883367) Journal

      because I am not anti vax, but i am pro choice. in that people should be free to do as they wish with their own bodies

      As long as these bodies are kept out of civilization, i.e. basically hermits, then I'm fine with that. If you want to participate in society, though, you have to get vaccinated. It is part of the social contract you make with the rest of humanity. It is analogous to you waving around your hands (your body) being free, as long as you don't hit someone in the face (someone else's body).

      • by c ( 8461 )

        If you want to participate in society, though, you have to get vaccinated.

        ... or prove, medically, that you cannot be vaccinated.

      • by khallow ( 566160 )

        It is part of the social contract you make with the rest of humanity.

        Put it on paper, then we'll discuss whether to accept it or not as a contract with the rest of society.

    • by MightyYar ( 622222 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:22AM (#48883425)

      because I am not anti vax, but i am pro choice. in that people should be free to do as they wish with their own bodies

      That is my baseline as well. But while I lean libertarian, the measles virus has no such ideology. As such, I am pragmatic and realize that this probably crosses the line of "your rights end where mine begin". You are infringing on other people's rights by knowingly and voluntarily making yourself vulnerable to deadly disease. I suppose that just like the right to free speech, people should have a right to not be vaccinated - but they do not have a right to be free from the consequences. Long and short - employers should be able to discriminate against people who voluntarily refuse vaccinations.

    • by Applehu Akbar ( 2968043 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:30AM (#48883475)

      With your own body, yes, in the same way that we have a basic right in this country to own guns. But if you showed up at work brandishing your weapon and randomly firing it into the air over the heads of crowds, then your employer would say that this right of yours ends where other bodies begin. It's the same way with your right to walk around unvaccinated.

  • by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:12AM (#48883349) Homepage Journal

    Snot is a noun. The adjective is snotty.

  • Paid sick leave (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tomalpha ( 746163 ) * on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:19AM (#48883395)

    they've already put some employees on paid leave until medically cleared

    Would this be mitigated by Disney *always* providing paid sick leave? The quote in TFS suggests that this might be the exception rather than the rule. If you encourage employees to come in to work while they're sick, or even hide their symptoms, then I guess you're more likely to see illnesses spread...

    • Re:Paid sick leave (Score:5, Informative)

      by Richard_at_work ( 517087 ) <richardpriceNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:43AM (#48883621)

      This is why the US system sucks - in the UK I get 4 weeks fully paid sick leave from my employer, and after that a further year of statutory sick pay from the Government. I also get 5 weeks paid holiday against which my sick leave does not count. In addition, I get reasonable accommodation to go see the doctor, dentist, optician, hospital etc etc.

      Why is the "land of the free" not similar?

      • Re:Paid sick leave (Score:4, Informative)

        by painandgreed ( 692585 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @02:41PM (#48886649)

        This is why the US system sucks - in the UK I get 4 weeks fully paid sick leave from my employer, and after that a further year of statutory sick pay from the Government. I also get 5 weeks paid holiday against which my sick leave does not count. In addition, I get reasonable accommodation to go see the doctor, dentist, optician, hospital etc etc.

        Why is the "land of the free" not similar?

        Because, due to history, mainly WW2, vacation as well as sick days and health care have mostly been relegated to the employers rather than by the government. Easy explanation is that it happened because during WW2, there was a pay freeze mandated due to the war effort, so employers started offering healthcare,sickdays, and vacation, above and beyond any required by law, as part of the job offer because that's what they could offer to get new employees in a time of a labor shortage. This continued after the war as it was now a standard part of employment. Thus, the middle class was largely taken care of and there was no large push to get the government involved. The cultural expectation is that if you want better of any of these things, you should get a better job which should just require work on your part. Also coming from that, is the cultural expectation that if you don't have better that what the law demands employers give you, that you are a slacker.

        I have it pretty good in the US and get two and half weeks a year of sick time (which carries over from year to year, so at this time, I actually have about five months of sick time since I hardly ever use it) and after ten years, five weeks of vacation time a year (which also carried over). I'm happy where I'm at because while I could probably find a job that pays more, I probably couldn't find one that gave me as much vacation time which is now in higher demand to me than more money.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) *

      Companies need to ensure employees take plenty of paid sick days and are not penalized in any way for them if they want to prevent the spread of disease. People need to stay home and ride the disease out, plus a couple of days to make sure it is really cleared up. Taking medication often just masks the symptoms, but the person is still infectious.

      I know some Japanese companies do it, but I can't see it ever being adopted in America.

    • The problem is that a lot of these diseases can spread before you see the symptoms. If you are a Disney worker and are spreading a vaccine-preventable disease without having any symptoms (yet), how are sick days helping?

  • by MikeRT ( 947531 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @09:38AM (#48883543)

    If you aren't going to vaccinate your children, then you have no business taking them to a highly international, very crowded space on the East Coast. It's about as stupid as living in DC which has a huge, very cosmopolitan population and not vaccinating. What might be ok in small towns where the population isn't very mobile is utterly insane in such an area.

  • by wonkey_monkey ( 2592601 ) on Friday January 23, 2015 @10:22AM (#48884065) Homepage

    It's-a smallpox after all.

"The voters have spoken, the bastards..." -- unknown

Working...