Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Mars NASA Space

Curiosity Rover Arrives At Long-Term Destination 33

When NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars, the mission team had a particular destination in mind: Mount Sharp. Just over two years and about nine kilometers of driving later, Curiosity has arrived at Mount Sharp. It will now begin its ascent of the mountain (PDF), first analyzing basal rocks with a "paintbrush" texture, then moving further to observe hematite-bearing rocks further up the slope. It will then proceed into an area laden with clay-bearing rocks, and finally to the upper reaches of the foothills, which contain rocks with magnesium sulfate in them. The team has selected routes and driving modes that they hope will slow the steadily accumulating damage to the rover's wheels.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Curiosity Rover Arrives At Long-Term Destination

Comments Filter:
  • Knee-jerk reaction (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Days after being excoriated for essentially failing at their primary science mission [spaceref.com], NASA announces it arrives at Mt. Sharp despite being several miles from the actual mountain.

    • Excoriated?
      "All extended missions were rated higher than "Good""
      • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

        by pz ( 113803 )

        Excoriated?

        "All extended missions were rated higher than "Good""

        Excoriated --- here are a few choice excerpts (there was some positive language, but the panel really did come down hard in this report):

        "The panel viewed this as a poor science return for such a large investment in a flagship mission."

        "Despite identification of two EM1 science objectives, the proposal lacked specific scientific questions to be answered, testable hypotheses, and proposed measurements and assessment of uncertainties and limitations."

        "It was unclear from both the proposal and presentation tha

        • by msauve ( 701917 )
          But, but.... look, shiny!
        • by AJWM ( 19027 ) on Friday September 12, 2014 @11:38PM (#47895565) Homepage

          "the proposal lacked specific scientific questions to be answered, testable hypotheses, and proposed measurements and assessment of uncertainties and limitations."

          Sounds like the report was written by physicists, not geologists or biologists.

          I figure "we're going to look around, crack open a few rocks and do some chemical analyses to see what's there" is pretty good science.

          On the other hand I also wonder why in almost 40 years nobody has yet tried repeating the labeled-release experiment on Viking which tested positive per the pre-mission criteria for signs of life.

          • On the other hand I also wonder why in almost 40 years nobody has yet tried repeating the labeled-release experiment on Viking which tested positive per the pre-mission criteria for signs of life.

            That's not exactly the way it turned out. The test got some major initial results when it was applied than nothing. The results from Viking fit the parameters of a very reactive and toxic surface, not for the presence of life, either archival or extent.

            • by AJWM ( 19027 )

              It still met the pre-mission criteria for life. That the other experiments gave confusing results was a contributing factor to wondering if those criteria were correct.

              There's some indication that those other experiments weren't sensitive enough to detect life signs even in Earth soil samples from places like the Atacama desert in Chile.

              In 2003, a team of researchers published a report in the journal Science in which they duplicated the tests used by the Viking 1 and Viking 2 Mars landers to detect life, a

    • by Anonymous Coward

      "Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people." - Socrates

    • There's no sharp boundary between the plain and Mt. Sharp.
      • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

        That would suggest they redefined the boundary after the criticism came out, like a politician would.

        Actually, I've read they were getting fairly close before the critical report even came out.

  • So the rover is driving 2.8 miles per year.

    Obviously used to DC Traffic.

    • by Richy_T ( 111409 )

      I hear it was being driven by an 80 year old Floridian.

      Apparently it had its right-turn indicator on all the way.

    • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

      DC traffic: bumper-to-bumper with lobbyists. Joy. I'd rather be on Mars.

  • Rover gets to his forebber home!

We cannot command nature except by obeying her. -- Sir Francis Bacon

Working...