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Open-Destination Quantum Teleportation 487

Roland Piquepaille writes "An international team of physicists has entangled five photons for the first time in the world, reports Technology Research News in "Five photons linked." Why is this important? Because it's the minimum number of qubits needed for universal error correction in quantum computing. In other words, they found a way to check computational errors in future quantum computers. The physicists also demonstrated what they call 'open-destination teleportation,' a way to teleport quantum information within and between computers." "They teleported the unknown quantum state of a single photon onto a superposition of three photons. They were then able to read out this teleported state at any one of the three photons by performing a measurement on the other two photons," adds PhysicsWeb in "Entanglement breaks new record ". This will be used in about ten to twenty years to move information among quantum networks. You'll find more details and references in this overview."
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Open-Destination Quantum Teleportation

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:38PM (#10105728)
    Blah Blah Blah Blah,Blah,Blah, You have the bridge #1.
    • by hndrcks ( 39873 )
      ...did someone let a fly in there?

    • by metlin ( 258108 ) * on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:08PM (#10105899) Journal
      It's actually fairly simple. In QC, you can perform any quantum operations on the qubits, but you cannot look at the bits without losing some information. Therefore, what you do is use error correcting codes, by superimposing the quantum states onto a set of photons whose states you observe, but do not use. What they have done here is basically taken the unknown quantum state of a photon onto a superposition set of three photons, and you can find the state of any one photon by observing the other two photons.

      This was predicted a while ago by Alexei Kitaev [caltech.edu], and Anton Zeilinger [univie.ac.at] had a preliminary demonstration of a basic q.t. system a while ago. I would imagine that this is just an extension of their works.
      • Thanks Commander Data.
      • by krumms ( 613921 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @11:14PM (#10106225) Journal
        It's actually fairly simple. In QC, you can perform any quantum operations on the qubits, but you cannot look at the bits without losing some information. Therefore, what you do is use error correcting codes, by superimposing the quantum states onto a set of photons whose states you observe, but do not use. What they have done here is basically taken the unknown quantum state of a photon onto a superposition set of three photons, and you can find the state of any one photon by observing the other two photons.

        Ah, much better. Thank you for putting it in layman's terms.

        Now, if you'll excuse me I think I feel my head exploding ...
      • by John Courtland ( 585609 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @11:22PM (#10106259)
        Maybe this is better: You have a particle. It has a certain and definite state. However, according to Quantum Mechanics, the act of observing the particle changes the state of it. That's no good because you can't rely on that state now. What you do is 'entangle' the particle with other ones, so that they have the same states, and never perform operations on the 'observer' particles. Then you can deduce the state of the 'hidden' particle by the states of the 'observer' ones.
        • This is how i read it too - but one thing doesn't make sense to me.

          If the particles are entangled, and it observe one of the observer ones, isn't that going to change all of them because they are still entangled?

          or do you unentangle them before you observe them? Can you unentangle particles without changing their state?
          • by qcomp ( 694740 ) on Monday August 30, 2004 @03:46AM (#10107124)
            If the particles are entangled, and it observe one of the observer ones, isn't that going to change all of them because they are still entangled?

            yes, any observation on a set of entangled particles changes the state of the whole set.
            However, if you do it appropriately it does change it in such a way, that (a) your measurement tells you nothing about the unknown state and (b) the unknown state is still encoded in the state of the unmeasured particles.

            or do you unentangle them before you observe them?

            not before - but the act of measurement disentangles the measured particle from the rest. It may lead to *all* particle being disentangled (e.g., if they were in a state |00000>+|11111> and you measure in the basis {|0>,|1>}) or it may leave the unmeasured particles entangled (e.g., if you measure in the basis {|+>=|0>+|1>, |->=|0>-|1>}).

            Can you unentangle particles without changing their state?

            no, since the state they are in is either entangled or not, disentangling them implies changing their state.
            However, the 5-qubit state may be a *redundant* encoding of another state Psi (of fewer qubits). Then it is possible to change the overall state (either by measurements or normal time-evolution) such that one ends up with a single qubit in the state Psi.
            This can be useful, since it may allow to if something has happened to the state encoded *without* learning anything about the state. This is the essential idea of quantum error correction: encode in a big (say 2^5-dimensional) space the state of a two-dimensional system. Detect, whether the state has moved out of this subspace (i.e. an error has occurred) but do it such that you do nott distinguish the two states in the subspace (thus leaving it untouched).

        • You have a particle. It has a certain and definite state.

          Nope, not in general since this assumes that the particle's state has been prepared beforehand.

          However, according to Quantum Mechanics, the act of observing the particle changes the state of it.

          Nope. You need to be precise about what you're saying before this statement can become meaningful. Suppose that you have a classical Stern-Gerlach experiment with a beam of silver atoms being emitted. Having passed these atoms through a filter (t
        • by ImaLamer ( 260199 ) <john.lamar@nospAM.gmail.com> on Monday August 30, 2004 @04:09AM (#10107165) Homepage Journal
          However, according to Quantum Mechanics, the act of observing the particle changes the state of it.

          Werner Heisenberg [aip.org] was pulled over...

          Police Officer: Can you tell me how fast you were going?

          Heisenberg [aip.org]: No, but I can tell you exactly where I am!

  • oh please (Score:4, Insightful)

    by OwlofCreamCheese ( 645015 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:38PM (#10105731)
    oh man... please stop... I dread reading the replys to this story... so so many people not understanding will come up. its not faster than light communication... I promise...
    • Re:oh please (Score:3, Informative)

      by Trigulus ( 781481 )
      I bet its tons faster than light in super-cold sodium gas. Your statement is meaningless since it has been physicaly demonstrated that light can be slowed,stopped and even made to go FASTER than it normaly travels in a vacuum.

      http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/27mar_stop light.htm [nasa.gov]
      • Re:oh please (Score:4, Insightful)

        by tylersoze ( 789256 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @11:39PM (#10106328)
        Ugh, you're so right, here we go again. Individual photons, or any massless particle, travel at *exactly* the speed of light, no more, no less. When physicists speak of "slowing down" or "speeding up" light, they are referring to a type of *wave* velocity is which utterly different than the speed of the individual particles making up the wave, is *not* the speed at which information can be transmitted by the wave. There is also no way to transmit information faster than light with entanglement. In fact, in the transactional interpretation (just an "interpretation" mind you, it in no way predicts different effects than other interpreations) the information is transmitted exactly at c, but *back in time* with advanced waves. These are prime examples of complex, subtle subjects that are totally misunderstood by the lay person because of simplified analogies or terminology.
  • In other news.. (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:39PM (#10105736)
    Yet another lazy article submitter copies the article verbatim and gives no credit.
  • by keiferb ( 267153 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:39PM (#10105738) Homepage
    Ok... so when do I get to stroll downstairs in the morning and say "Energize" to some guy standing at the controls of my transporter pad to get to work, rather than driving?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:41PM (#10105746)
    They were then able to read out this teleported state at any one of the three photons by performing a measurement on the other two photon

    Professor: No fair! You changed the outcome by measuring it!

  • I'm going to bed.

    Enterprise, one to beam up.
  • by rpbailey1642 ( 766298 ) <robert.b.pratt@nOspAm.gmail.com> on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:45PM (#10105766)
    As far as I'm aware, this does NOT mean anything about downloading files, or any crap like that. When it says moving data across a quantum network, they are referring to a Beowulf cluster of sorts, for data processing. Please correct me if I'm wrong, my quatum computational theory is a bit rusty.
    • Data is data. Downloading files and communicating between Beowulf clusters is more similar than different.
      • by metlin ( 258108 ) * on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:02PM (#10105874) Journal
        Not in the quantum world. You can transport the data, but you cannot copy the data. This is one of the primary premises of Quantum Computation, covered by the No Cloning Theorem.

        Ofcourse, if you are talking about the inherent parallelism in q.c., you are right.
    • by mAineAc ( 580334 )
      these are only photons. All they have done is entagled them so that what happens to one it happens to the other. They need a minimum of 5 for error correction. I didn't read the article yet so I don't know the distance involved. Small distances are a lot when it comes to this. If I remember right they had just performed an entanglement of a couple of meters in just the last year. Like I said this is just photons, particles of light, they have not teleported actual solid matter so physically you can't move t
    • by wass ( 72082 )
      it is a validation of quantum teleportation, which is basically the transmission of the quantum state of a single qubit (or SU(2) algebra system, eg an electron) from one qubit to another. The quantum wavefunction of the original qubit is destroyed in the process, and the new qubit will have the same quantum wavefunction as the original. So you're teleporting the information of the qubit.

      Actually, it's much more complicated than that. What I described above is basic quantum teleportation, which has bee

  • So uh...... does this mean faster than light communication? or am I missing something.
    • Re:Faster than Light (Score:5, Informative)

      by metlin ( 258108 ) * on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:12PM (#10105921) Journal
      You are missing something. This has got nothing to do with faster than light communication, instead it's on how they were able to successfully entangle 5 photons, which is the minimum number needed to implement a universal error correction system in quantum computation.

      Teleportation was achieved a long time ago by a bunch of folks at Innsbruck [univie.ac.at], led by Prof Anton Zeilinger [univie.ac.at].
      • I was always told Quantum Entanglement could not be used for faster-than-light communication because the results yielded gibberish- you couldn't actually send a proper message.

        With error correction you should now be able to do this. So, my question is, if you can send a message between two points instantaniously, why could you not do this between say, A spaceship heading to Alpha Centauri and Earth?
        • Re:Faster than Light (Score:5, Informative)

          by metlin ( 258108 ) * on Sunday August 29, 2004 @11:12PM (#10106220) Journal
          So here's the idea - quantum entanglement is when you have two quantum states that have to be given in reference to each other, even though the two states maybe contained in elements spatially separated.

          But - no useful information can be transmitted between the two systems. This is because the information in itself is given by probabilistic superposition of the states. For instance, you have a Qubit defined as the superposition of states, given by |psi> = a|0> + b|1> - so you can only find out when they are absolute states (0) or (1), and not in between -- and that will not happen at speeds less than the speed of light. In order to find out what state the system is in (in between 0&1), you will need to be able to copy the state, which is prohibited by the No Cloning Theorem [wikipedia.org].

          So, to answer your question - you *may* be able to achieve instantaneous transmission of information, but you can never observe that information in a causal fashion less than the speed of light. Did that make sense? :)
          • Re:Faster than Light (Score:3, Interesting)

            by TheLink ( 130905 )
            "So, to answer your question - you *may* be able to achieve instantaneous transmission of information, but you can never observe that information in a causal fashion less than the speed of light. Did that make sense? :)"

            What if that information is a person? What happens then? Does the person get instantaneously transmitted to the other side or not? e.g. you transport the blackbox, even though you never look inside, the blackbox still gets to the other side.

            Or is it impossible to set the state of the origi
          • Then it is FTL if the transmission is instantaneous. I mean FTL in that because it's instant from point A to point B in teleportation (so I'm assuming), then such a method would be far faster then say....using radio waves or a beam of light.

            Imagine being able to control Spirit on Mars in "real-time" or a network that spans all of space. But the question is how does the recipient know when to expect such a transmission? I can only think of using a synchronous fax like system involving atomic clocks at both
  • by NotQuiteReal ( 608241 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:51PM (#10105800) Journal
    I didn't RTFA, but I'll just guess that it lays the groundwork for building a computer, sometime in the next century that will be able to completely emulate [read: upload] a human personality/consciousness into an environment where they think they are still alive.

    Of course, during upload their body would have been destroyed. Anyhoo, it sure will suck to have been the last person to think they had to die.

    And that, is the point of this article. Fodder for postings such as this. Etc.

    [And yes, I did have to use a spell-checker to get "consciousness" right, what are else computers for, if not for spelling?]

    • Re:What this means (Score:3, Insightful)

      by damiam ( 409504 )
      I didn't RTFA, but I'll just guess that it lays the groundwork for building a computer, sometime in the next century that will be able to completely emulate [read: upload] a human personality/consciousness into an environment where they think they are still alive.

      You guessed wrong.

  • by mozingod ( 738108 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:52PM (#10105809)
    Open-Destination Teleportation...wasn't this already tested with success? Yea, I seem to remember a story about this. Something about all hell breaking lose and killing all the Marines/scientists that were working on the project though...
  • Finally... (Score:4, Funny)

    by PDHoss ( 141657 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:52PM (#10105813)
    ...I empathize with Barbie. Math is hard.
  • by orthogonal ( 588627 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:52PM (#10105814) Journal
    The physicists also demonstrated what they call 'open-destination teleportation,' a way to teleport quantum information within and between computers."

    See honey, I wasn't lying when I told you I knew nothing about it!

    One of those physicists must have teleported that donkey porn onto my computer!
  • The Wiki-Tome (Score:4, Informative)

    by RabidChicken ( 684107 ) <`moc.yekcutswerdna' `ta' `werdna'> on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:52PM (#10105817) Homepage
    For those of us who failed High School physics, from Wikipedia [wikipedia.org]: A qubit (quantum + bit; pronounced /kyoobit/ [1] ) is a unit of quantum information. That information is described by state in a 2-level quantum mechanical system.
    To be perfectly honest, quantum computing scares me to some extent. Things like PGP encryption and other very sensitive operations could, quite literally overnight, be blown away and dangerously shift power quickly. Then again we will also usher in a new age of unlimited (well, from a 2004 perspective, matter itself ultimately has a limit for storage and processing) computing that can make engineering in all fields like nothing we have seen before. And, the best part, we will see it in our lifetimes.
    • Re:The Wiki-Tome (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Veridium ( 752431 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:13PM (#10105923) Homepage
      And, the best part, we will see it in our lifetimes.

      Maybe. This is the wrong time and political environment for these types of advances to be occuring, IMO. I could be wrong, but I see governmental control on this technology for the foreseeable future. There isn't more now because they really don't have anything that could be mass produced, but when we reach that point, get ready for the "terrorists could do xyz with this!" hyperbole and heavy legislation to control it.

      I guess if they just limit it to universities and favored businesses we might still get to see some of the fruits of it. Let's hope I'm wrong. The faster we get quantum computing into the hands of as many people as possible, the faster our technology will advance.
      • Re:The Wiki-Tome (Score:3, Interesting)

        by josecanuc ( 91 )
        The governments of the world's nations have always seemed to have some amount of control over ideas and technology such as this.

        During World War II, many mathemeticians worked for the governments of the UK and USA to break and design cryptographic tools and methods.

        It's only recently that some of them are being allowed to tell of what they have done.

        One can only imagine what is being developed these days that we won't know about until many years later.
    • Re:The Wiki-Tome (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sirsnork ( 530512 )
      Yeah, just like those damn flying cars and cold fusion. As always don't count your chickens before they hatch
    • Re:The Wiki-Tome (Score:5, Informative)

      by metlin ( 258108 ) * on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:19PM (#10105954) Journal
      And, the best part, we will see it in our lifetimes.

      While I appreciate your optimism, I must tell you that the chances of QC taking a giant leap within the next 25 years is quite low.

      Sure, people will build preliminary quantum computation elements, and will perform simple operations. But to have a system comparable to existing computers will take a really, really long time.

      For one, the resources needed to perform and control such operations is really expensive, and occupy enormous amounts of space. Even technologies used today to achieve the quantum hall effect (one of the primary requirements if you are building a q.c.) is really primitive. For instance, consider MIT's carbon-nanotube technology -- the problem is that while you can achieve q.h.e., not two systems can be duplicated perfectly. Other methods such as building solid state elements to do this (which is what I work on) have been quite unsuccessful.

      That, and the fact that we are yet to develop a good enough quantum error correction system. The thing is that in order for QC to take off big time, other areas (material science, nanotech, theoretical CS and information theory, etc) need to progress significantly.

      Sure, you may see some primitive QC within the next 40 years or so. But the probability of you seeing a QC capable of, say, solving Primes in P or one that can play you a DVD is quite low. Just my two cents. And yes, IAAQP (I'm a quantum physicist).
  • by spellraiser ( 764337 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:52PM (#10105820) Journal
    From TFA:

    In quantum teleportation, complete information about the quantum state of a particle is instantaneously transferred by the sender, who is usually called Alice, to a receiver called Bob.

    So, this would only be useful for sending information about a quantum state to guys named Bob? The quantum state thing is limiting enough, but c'mon ... Bob?

    Well, tell you what. I'm changing my name to Bob. If you can't beat them, join them. I mean, these guys will be the information uberlords of the future. People will queue up to them, asking 'Did anything come for me yet?' And they will go, like, 'Show me the money!'

    The Bobs of the future will be ultra-popular and rich.

    ...

    Yes, I haven't taken my medication today? Why do you ask? :P

  • by sammyo ( 166904 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @09:54PM (#10105831) Journal
    "they found a way to check computational errors in future quantum computers."

    Just how far in the future will we be able to check? Should be a great aid to debugging! But what happens if I fix a problem that causes my great grandson to come back in time to help me to meet my wife? Oh, wait.

  • The ability to transport or "beam" a light photon used in quantum computing is not nearly as complex as even a grain of sand, let alone transporting a person. I light photon already is pure energy, not really matter (in the sense needed to compare to a person.)

    Transportation like on star trek is a long ways off... however we are on trak for the star trek universe... transparent aluminum in 20 years according to scotti when they went to 1985 earth... we've discovered it now...

    I'm still waiting for my sub
    • the "transparent aluminum" of recent slashdotism was nothing of the sort. It was alumina - a ceramic material that has little in common from a material standpoint with its metallic cousin.

      and it wasnt that new, either. sapphires are natural examples of translucent alumina.
  • While I have to admit that I have only a fairly rudamentry understanding of the theory behind all this, it's great to see that progress is bringing us all the closer to realizing a quantom computer.
    As I understand it, what this is saying is that they have not discovered a way to have error correction in a quantom network. AFAIK this quantom network is not referring to a network of computers as we would think of it today, but is basically saying that in a network of entangled particles, or a network of qbi
  • As with nanotechnology, I'll believe in quantum computing when they produce some real results, like say factoring RSA 2048 [rsasecurity.com]. Hell, let's see them factor the number 339. If practical quantum computing is decades away, can't they at least show us something impractical, just to prove that quantum computing isn't just hand-waving bullshit?
  • Buzzwords (Score:2, Interesting)

    by FiReaNGeL ( 312636 )
    I hate the 'Teleporting' part always associated with this concept... Marketing in science? Weird, but it works... just look at the 'Nanotechnology' craze. 'Nanomachines'... yeah right, just call them proteins already! 99% of grants I saw associated with nanotechnology had to do with proteins used in a way or another, which we've been doing for >30 years anyway. Far from the nanotubes-based nanomachines that are supposed to 'repair' our cells, right? Buzzwords! o_O
  • What we don't know (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:06PM (#10105890)
    What we don't know about quantum physics would float many battleships.

    What we may be seeing is the physical evidence that space and time are not much at all like we think they are.

    Entanglement seems to allow things far away from each other, that used to be close to each other, to react to each other like they are still close to each other.

    Science fiction fans will understand that the most likely explanations for that kind of thing are also likely to be wrong.

    I look forward to a better understanding of this kind of behavior because it will allow us to better manipulate and control the way our area of the universe works.

    For those who think of this as star trek blek, try putting yourself in the place of someone 200 years ago who was told that someone who lives in England would be able to visit someone in the colonies by a trip of only 3 hours.

    dzimmerm (who is at work and whose account does not seem to recognize his password and who does not have any way to pop his home email from work due to SPIT, filtering, and SPIT lotus notes)
    • by wass ( 72082 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:53PM (#10106137)
      What we may be seeing is the physical evidence that space and time are not much at all like we think they are.

      Actually, this is physical realization of quantum principles that have been known for about 70-80 years. And all of those quantum theories were already verified at the fundamental level. There's no new fundamental physics theory being discovered here, the strangeness of relativistic time/space at the quantum limit (ie, Quantum Field Theory) has been quite well developed and understood for a long time now.

      This is more like an applied physics or engineering verification of a quantum applied physicists sketch for quantum error correction of quantum teleportation.

      Now if physicsists were able to finally merge gravitation with quantum mechanics, that would be huge and just might float your battleships. But this quantum teleportation is certainly not that at all.

  • But it sounds a whole lot like Ender's Game. When will I be able to buy an Ansible from my local radioshack?
  • by Aaron England ( 681534 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:10PM (#10105913)
    Teleportation is the name given by science fiction writers to the feat of making an object or person disintegrate in one place while a perfect replica appears somewhere else. How this is accomplished is usually not explained in detail, but the general idea seems to be that the original object is scanned in such a way as to extract all the information from it, then this information is transmitted to the receiving location and used to construct the replica, not necessarily from the actual material of the original, but perhaps from atoms of the same kinds, arranged in exactly the same pattern as the original. A teleportation machine would be like a fax machine, except that it would work on 3-dimensional objects as well as documents, it would produce an exact copy rather than an approximate facsimile, and it would destroy the original in the process of scanning it. A few science fiction writers consider teleporters that preserve the original, and the plot gets complicated when the original and teleported versions of the same person meet; but the more common kind of teleporter destroys the original, functioning as a super transportation device, not as a perfect replicator of souls and bodies.

    In 1993 an international group of six scientists, including IBM Fellow Charles H. Bennett, confirmed the intuitions of the majority of science fiction writers by showing that perfect teleportation is indeed possible in principle, but only if the original is destroyed. In subsequent years, other scientists have demonstrated teleportation experimentally in a variety of systems, including single photons, coherent light fields, nuclear spins, and trapped ions. Teleportation promises to be quite useful as an information processing primitive, facilitating long range quantum communication (perhaps unltimately leading to a "quantum internet"), and making it much easier to build a working quantum computer. But science fiction fans will be disappointed to learn that no one expects to be able to teleport people or other macroscopic objects in the foreseeable future, for a variety of engineering reasons, even though it would not violate any fundamental law to do so.

    In the past, the idea of teleportation was not taken very seriously by scientists, because it was thought to violate the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics, which forbids any measuring or scanning process from extracting all the information in an atom or other object. According to the uncertainty principle, the more accurately an object is scanned, the more it is disturbed by the scanning process, until one reaches a point where the object's original state has been completely disrupted, still without having extracted enough information to make a perfect replica. This sounds like a solid argument against teleportation: if one cannot extract enough information from an object to make a perfect copy, it would seem that a perfect copy cannot be made. But the six scientists found a way to make an end run around this logic, using a celebrated and paradoxical feature of quantum mechanics known as the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen effect.

    Read just how this effect works, here. [ibm.com]

    • [...] But the six scientists found a way to make an end run around this logic, using a celebrated and paradoxical feature of quantum mechanics known as the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen effect. Read just how this effect works, here. [ibm.com]

      Very good article, but some people might find Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox [wikipedia.org] article on Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] somewhat better for an introductory text, and at the same time richer in details:

      The EPR paradox arises in a thought experiment which shows that quantum mechanics leads to

  • Tsk tsk ... (Score:3, Funny)

    by H_Fisher ( 808597 ) <hvfisher@ h o t m a i l .com> on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:15PM (#10105933)
    More than 60 posts replying to an article with "quantum" in the blurb, and not one Quantum Leap reference or bitchy gripe about the quality of Star Trek: Enterprise.

    And you call yourselves nerds!

  • So, lets say you have two pairs of entagled photons. Half you give to one side and half to the other. If you want to send a '0' bit, you read each photong normally, and when the other side checks, they can see each of thier photons have a different reading.

    Now if they want to send a '1' then they entanlge the two photons that they have on thier own end, making all four of them be entangled, and then read just one of them. Now all four of them would be in the same quantum state, no?
  • by JustOK ( 667959 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:19PM (#10105953) Journal
    Thanks to quantum computation and teleportation, this is actually the first post.
  • by G4from128k ( 686170 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:25PM (#10105995)
    Given the patent fiasco of the internet (just add "e" to anything and receive a free patent), now is the time to create prior art for quantum computing and publish all the ideas for adding "q" to everything. Only by striking first and getting innovation in the public domain can we have true open and unencumbered standards.

    And as long as wide spread adoption of quantum computing is more that 17 years away, companies can't read this message and strike first (prepatenting these ideas first). If companies patent ideas too soon, the patent will be dead when the real money is being made.
    • Too late (Score:3, Informative)

      by hweimer ( 709734 )
      Given the patent fiasco of the internet (just add "e" to anything and receive a free patent), now is the time to create prior art for quantum computing and publish all the ideas for adding "q" to everything. Only by striking first and getting innovation in the public domain can we have true open and unencumbered standards.

      There are already lots of patents on quantum computing:
      5,530,263 [uspto.gov]
      5,768,297 [uspto.gov]
      6,128,764 [uspto.gov]
      6,218,832 [uspto.gov]
      and many, many more.
  • by nihilogos ( 87025 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:35PM (#10106047)
    Because it's the minimum number of qubits needed for universal error correction in quantum computing

    Well, the smallest error correcting code that can protect againt a single error requires five qubits. To actually do error correction you need quite a few more.
  • by eRacer1 ( 762024 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:41PM (#10106068)
    On my systems three Q*berts is not sufficient for error correction in my simulations. Coily always gets me sooner rather than later.
  • The Link? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by boatboy ( 549643 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @10:46PM (#10106106) Homepage
    When physicists say "teleportation", they are describing the transfer of key properties from one particle to another without a physical link. Researchers from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Science used an 800m-long optical fibre fed through a public sewer system tunnel to connect labs on opposite sides of the River Danube.

    I've actually wondered about this in a few QT articles. The picture I get from reading about it, you could entangle photons across the planet and transfer state between them instantly. In many articles, like the one quoted above, they say in one sentence teleportation transfers states without a physical link, but in the next, describe a physical link used in the expirement. Could some quantumly-entangled slashdotter explain this to us unwashed Newtonian masses? Are the "wires" optional?
    • Re:The Link? (Score:3, Informative)

      by aXis100 ( 690904 )
      The information (state) can be read instantly, but it takes time to distribute the media (for want of a better word).

      1) Basically you make some entangles particles (whether they be photons or atoms), and at this point they have an unknown, but equivalent state.

      2) You then need to physically transport those particles to different places (by optical fibre, motorbike courier or pack camel)

      3) When you read the state of one particle, it forces the particle to choose a state. The other particle also takes on
  • Quantum teleportation is akin to faxing a document and in the process destroying the original.

    [Scene: RIAA Headquarters]
    Mitch Bainwol: "This quadrant teleportation thing sounds too good to be true."
    Cary Sherman: "Get me Orrin Hatch on the phone. We need mandatory quantum teleplantation by 2010."
  • by Tablizer ( 95088 ) on Sunday August 29, 2004 @11:11PM (#10106215) Journal
    They didn't really know the dangers of nuclear power when they started messing with it. The first nuclear reactors were built right under campus stadiums. What if quantum computing messes with or pollutes something we don't know about yet? Maybe there is "probability pollution" or something.

    Hell, it might be decreasing further the chances of nerds getting dates or something :-)
  • by Net Spinner ( 732666 ) on Monday August 30, 2004 @03:32AM (#10107102)
    I haven't seen this mentioned in the threads yet so...

    Quantum computing will NOT necessarily speed up all your porn browsing, DOOM playing arses. Instead, Quantum computing affects a set of computational problems that fall into the category of "Non-Determinstic time" algorithms. Non-Determinstic algorithms are identifiable by the fact that they all benefit hugely from being run in parallel. Basically a good rule of thumb is that quantum computing will affect algorithms that gain from being run on massive numbers of processors simultaneously given different (but not inter-communicating) inputs.

    Some such problems are:
    --Most if not all current cryptography
    --SETI
    --Other problems where you're looking for one specific output given a potentially huge number of inputs.

    As an example in cryptography, a sufficiently powerful quantum computer would be able to break your RSA, DSA, DES3 or any other symmetric or non-symmetric cypher instantaneously if the author of the quantum program knew what they were looking for.

    I'm suprised no one has mentioned it so far in the threads...

  • by struberg ( 757804 ) <struberg@@@yahoo...de> on Monday August 30, 2004 @08:37AM (#10107872)
    1.)
    Austria != Australia
    In Austria there are NO kangaroos, but the Alps, Mozart, Beethoven, Sissy, Schwarzenegger and the river danube in the middle of europe!

    2.)
    It should not be "Hans J. Briegal of the Australian Academy of Sciences"

    but

    "Hans J. Briegel of the Austrian Academy of Sciences"

    Read more at the University of Innsbruck/Austria page:
    http://homepage.uibk.ac.at/homepage/c705/c705114/ [uibk.ac.at]
  • by mwood ( 25379 ) on Monday August 30, 2004 @10:17AM (#10108514)
    ...B: is it too late to get people to stop calling this "teleportation"? No material object winked out of existence here and recreated itself over there.

    Otherwise wake me when they get as far as transfer booths.

    Must go -- gotta teleport some files to the server.

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