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Beer Medicine Science

Researchers Create New Probiotic Beer That Boosts Immunity (upi.com) 84

randomErr writes: A new patent has been filed for a innovative brewing technique that incorporates a live strain of good bacteria into the brewing process. Researchers at NUS (National University of Singapore) have created a probiotic sour beer that may boost immunity and improve gut health. The bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei L26 is capable of neutralizing toxins and viruses and regulating the immune system. Chan Mei Zhi Alcine, of the Food Science and Technology Program at NUS said, "While good bacteria are often present in food that have been fermented, there are currently no beers in the market that contain probiotics. Developing sufficient counts of live probiotics in beer is a challenging feat as beers contain hop acids that prevent the growth and survival of probiotics. As a believer of achieving a healthy diet through consuming probiotics, this is a natural choice for me when I picked a topic for my final-year project."
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Researchers Create New Probiotic Beer That Boosts Immunity

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    As a believer of achieving a healthy diet through consuming probiotics, this is a natural choice for me when I picked a topic for my final-year project.

    Call us when you have gone through peer review by scientists who weren't hoping for a positive result before they even started. You're not doing any favours for the notion of probiotics having more scientific credibility than Revlon's latest innovation.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      "Probiotics" have _Zero_ scientific validity. As in none at all and in many places, like the US and Europe, claiming that they have any validity is illegal:

      "Due to these ambiguities, the European Commission placed a ban on putting the word "probiotic" on the packaging of products because such labeling misleads consumers to believe a health benefit is provided by the product when no scientific proof exists to demonstrate that health effect.
      In the United States, the FDA and Federal Trade Commission have issue

      • Re:"As a believer"? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Wednesday June 28, 2017 @11:38PM (#54709895)

        "Probiotics" have _Zero_ scientific validity.

        That is true. But they used to have scientific validity. There was solid evidence that the probiotic bacteria in yogurt resulted in extended lifetimes in the valleys of the Caucasus Mountains, where yogurt consumption was unusually high, and always prepared with live cultures.

        ... but then in comparing age listed on birth certificates and baptismal records, with age determined by physical examination, there were wide discrepancies. It turns out the real reason for high longevity was forged documents used to avoid conscription during the First World War. The yogurt eaters actually had expected longevity well within the normal range.

        Oh well, it was a good theory while it lasted.

        • Oh well, it was a good theory while it lasted.

          Or perhaps we have not reached the pinnacle of ultimate medical knowledge. As they say, practicing medicine. Today's gospel is tomorrow's heresy is next year's gospel. And don't confuse probiotics with homeopathics, aka placebos.

          The human GI tract is well studied and documented but watch out if you ever get an intestinal parasite or disorder.
          Earlier this year I was infected with Cryptosporidium [patient.info]. My doctor tried a couple different treatments that seemed to work then didn't. I was basically a research

        • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
          Probiotic bacteria in yogurt does absolutely nothing for my heart burn but even the cheapest probiotic supplement makes a world of difference for me. Not all probiotics have perceptible, yet alone measurable, benefits.
        • Well lying about your age is something lots of people do, but they usually want to drop a few years and not the other way around.
      • I agree. Probiotics have no validity. We know that a family of bacteria in the gut is needed for good health, and bad health is indicated by the "bad" family of bacteria in the gut. But 1. How does the bacteria survive the alcohol? 2. How much of the bacteria actually survives a gut containing toxic chemicals in the first place?
    • So....they're invented basically Beer Kombucha?

      Just using beer ingredients (malt extract) instead of sweet tea?

    • You're not doing any favours for the notion of probiotics having more scientific credibility than Revlon's latest innovation.

      Linked in TFA [sciencedirect.com], and then there's a trivial web search [nih.gov]:

      Probiotics are safe and appear to exert some beneficial effects in GI-related illnesses. The use of probiotics in non-GI illnesses is not sufficiently supported by current data.

      Or a little more googling and you'll find plenty of [nih.gov] peer-reviewed [nih.gov] articles saying they have a small beneficial effect (*for certain diseases/ailments*), with some studies recommending caution for various groups [nih.gov].

      No, they don't appear to be as medically useful as their "anti" counterparts, and they don't appear to cure cancer (though they can be good -- and bad! -- for cancer patients [cancercenter.com]), but they are hardly in the same category as a beauty product.

      And

      Call us when you have gone through peer review by scientists who weren't hoping for a positive result before they even started.

      S

    • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
      Probiotics got rid of my heartburn. Chronic heartburn can directly cause esophageal cancer. Removing the heart burn means I no longer have the risk of esophageal cancer caused by heart burn. Probiotics have reduced my risk of cancer. Stop taking probitoics, 2-3 weeks later, heart burn is back, noticeably reduced heartburn after 3-4 days, as in I don't wake up in the middle of the night from pain. I was on Prilosec for a few years before I gave probiotics a try.

      There are peer reviewed research for certain
  • by Chewbacon ( 797801 ) on Wednesday June 28, 2017 @08:29PM (#54709055)

    These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

  • Let's just hope they are using different approach to the one which Starbucks et al seems to be using [bbc.co.uk]. (It's probably a good idea to finish your coffee before clicking!)
  • by ozduo ( 2043408 ) on Wednesday June 28, 2017 @08:46PM (#54709111)
    To get a healthy beer gut?
  • by sk999 ( 846068 ) on Wednesday June 28, 2017 @08:54PM (#54709133)

    "No, No, these are the GOOD kind of bacteria."

  • "Beer, is there anything it can't do?"

  • Before scientists figured out that clean water was safer to drink, people drink alcohol all the time because the fermentation process killed most bacteria.
  • Buy that Man a NEW AND IMPROVED BEER! :-D (I mean shit, at that point what else would you get him....)
    • We've already got beer that makes people more attractive.
      Also one that makes them experts at sports trivia and politics.
  • by kenh ( 9056 )

    Researchers Create New Probiotic Beer That Boosts Immunity

    Poop beer?

  • What the hell is that supposed to mean?
  • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Wednesday June 28, 2017 @10:38PM (#54709599) Journal

    There is a lot more to maintaining healthy gut bacteria than just drinking them down. There have been precious few studies that show "probiotic" foods or drinks actually do anything, and almost none that show effects that are more than extremely temporary.

    If you want to have healthy gut bacteria, you've got to eat a variety of healthy food that have been minimally processed or not processed at all. And stay off the antibiotics. Fermented foods and foods that are advertised as having "live bacteria" just won't get the job done.

    • by sad_ ( 7868 )

      eating varied and healthy, skipping my nice fat, salty and suggary processed foods sounds too much trouble.
      i'd rather just go for feces transplantation instead...

    • by Evtim ( 1022085 )

      Fermented foods and foods that are advertised as having "live bacteria" just won't get the job done

      That sir, is a fallacy :)

      Yogurt that has no live bacteria inside is a simple protein shake, so why would you buy it in the first place - get the shake instead! My apologies to all you reasonable /. readers and writers; I am well aware that "official medicine" has not figured out the GI tract yet. However, I simply cannot discount my own experience here - when you get cured [by fermented foods and some probioti

    • by dj245 ( 732906 )

      There is a lot more to maintaining healthy gut bacteria than just drinking them down. There have been precious few studies that show "probiotic" foods or drinks actually do anything, and almost none that show effects that are more than extremely temporary.

      If you want to have healthy gut bacteria, you've got to eat a variety of healthy food that have been minimally processed or not processed at all. And stay off the antibiotics. Fermented foods and foods that are advertised as having "live bacteria" just won't get the job done.

      There has been a lot of scientific activity lately that shows that the bacteria in the gut play a large role in every aspect of both mental and physical health. There is correlation that fat people and thin people have different ratios of different types of bacteria. Cause or effect, who knows, but the correlation is there.

      My personal pet theory (based on basically nothing) is that it is reasonable to assume that bacteria which are successful in breaking down food outside the body may also affect how fo

      • by Bengie ( 1121981 )

        there is correlation that fat people and thin people have different ratios of different types of bacteria. Cause or effect, who knows, but the correlation is there.

        There have been a few fecal transplants where a fat person got one from a skinny person, then the fat person lost nearly all of their excess weight after the transplant without a change to their diet or exercise.

  • Perhaps vitamin C added to cigarettes or Omga fatty acids in pot brownies or high protein potato chips or super fiber added to mega caffeine energy drinks? Hmmm.

    Or you could just eat those without the carriers?

  • "Boost the immune system" means what exactly?

    " neutralizing toxins" - what are these "toxins"?

    "Good bacteria" - over-simplification.

    /. - you're better than this!

  • by dargaud ( 518470 ) <slashdot2NO@SPAMgdargaud.net> on Thursday June 29, 2017 @05:04AM (#54710777) Homepage
    OK, I'll try to sum up what beer and yeast is. Yeast evolved over a long time by actually loosing the ability to turn alcohol into vinegar. Many microorganisms can digest sugars into alcohol and then vinegar in one fell swoop. When yeast lost that, it was actually an evolutionary advantage because alcohol is toxic, so by itself evolving to resist the toxicity of alcohol, it could kill of the competition (all the other microorganisms present in rotting fruits) and live happily. Men used that ability to make beer, wine, etc... Wild yeast dies off after something like 8% alcohol, but humans have been selecting it for 10ky so it resists 12% (and now up to 15% in some strong wines).

    So, my point is that making a beer with other stuff growing in it can mean only a few things: either you kill off the yeast after its work is done and replace it with probiotics, or you make a piss weak beer that won't kill off the probiotics, or it's bullshit and the probiotic's dead from the alcohol.

    • by hawkfish ( 8978 )

      OK, I'll try to sum up what beer and yeast is. Yeast evolved over a long time by actually loosing the ability to turn alcohol into vinegar. Many microorganisms can digest sugars into alcohol and then vinegar in one fell swoop. When yeast lost that, it was actually an evolutionary advantage because alcohol is toxic, so by itself evolving to resist the toxicity of alcohol, it could kill of the competition (all the other microorganisms present in rotting fruits) and live happily. Men used that ability to make beer, wine, etc... Wild yeast dies off after something like 8% alcohol, but humans have been selecting it for 10ky so it resists 12% (and now up to 15% in some strong wines).

      Not only that, but humans have been evolving [scientificamerican.com] to tolerate ethyl alcohol for about 10My:

      The results suggested there was a single genetic mutation 10 million years ago that endowed human ancestors with an enhanced ability to break down ethanol. "I remember seeing this huge difference in effects with this mutation and being really surprised," Carrigan said.

  • It's called Kombucha, people!

  • One of the local breweries makes a Dinosour beer with these Lactus bacterial beasties in it.

    Not bad. Not great either.

  • the yeast in beer and wine is a probiotic

  • It's well known that hops were added to beer by the church in 1516 through the "beer purity act" in order to quell it's people, counter-act the beers used in pagan rituals, and to extract taxes. Hops contains large amounts of estradiol, which converts in estrogen in the body and causes men to become fat, lazy, less virile, and less energetic. The church first noticed this when they found that girls working the hops began menstruating very early and men had decreased sexual desire. Before the beer purity act

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