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CERN's Particle Smashers List Their Toughest Tech Challenges 31

Posted by samzenpus
from the this-is-hard dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at CERN have detailed some of the big technology problems they need to solve to help the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) solve some of the fundamental questions about the nature of the universe. 'You make it, we break it' is the CERN openlab motto which looks at emerging tech: data acquisition, computing platforms, data storage architectures, compute management and provisioning and more are on the to do list."
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CERN's Particle Smashers List Their Toughest Tech Challenges

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  • by gurps_npc (621217) on Thursday May 22, 2014 @03:24PM (#47069431) Homepage
    Left out terrorists sneaking in to steal their anti-matter and threaten the vatican.
  • The actual document (Score:5, Informative)

    by kyrsjo (2420192) on Thursday May 22, 2014 @03:35PM (#47069515)

    ... not just an article talking about it.
    https://zenodo.org/record/8765... [zenodo.org]

  • 'You make it, we break it' is the CERN openlab motto which looks at emerging tech: data acquisition, computing platforms, data storage architectures, compute management and provisioning and more are on the to do list."

    So did CERN make or break Scientific Linux? Why would computing platforms even be a consideration for them, given that along w/ Fermi, they are among the creators of Scientific Linux?

  • by aprentic (1832) on Thursday May 22, 2014 @04:19PM (#47069865) Homepage

    I love seeing documents like this.
    A lot of cool stuff gets built because someone has a need for it.
    My current employer (cloudant.com) got started the same way. A couple of LHC researchers couldn't get the data storage throughput levels they needed with existing solutions so they built a new one.
    I'm sure if you look around you can find tons of stuff that comes from papers like this.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Some numbers about the computing power at the CERN computing center (July 2013):

    Number of machines: 17,000 processors with 85,000 cores (Source)
    All physics computing is done using the Linux operating system and commodity PC hardware. There are few Solaris server machines as well, especially for databases (Oracle).

    • Some numbers about the computing power at the CERN computing center (July 2013):

      Number of machines: 17,000 processors with 85,000 cores (Source)
      All physics computing is done using the Linux operating system and commodity PC hardware. There are few Solaris server machines as well, especially for databases (Oracle).

      And Yes, it can run Crysis.

  • by werepants (1912634) on Thursday May 22, 2014 @06:52PM (#47070955)
    They are collecting an incredible amount of data every instant that this machine is running - they've got extremely capable processing that combs through terabits of data and discards the 99.9% that is irrelevant, so that they merely have to store gigabits to disk (as it is, they have an incredible amount of storage on site). Some pretty impressive computing they have to go through before they even begin to look at the data.
    • by kyrsjo (2420192)

      Luckilly most of that is done in the trigger of the experiment, where dedicated hardware solutions filter out a lot. These boards typically sits physically close to the experiment, monitoring a few key subdetectors. When one of a list of pre-programmed conditions occur, they read out all the data from that event, and pass it on to higher levels of sorting. This has to happen very quickly, as there is a new collission every 25 ns, and each of the subdetectors can only hold the data for a few events before it

  • by Rinikusu (28164) on Thursday May 22, 2014 @07:21PM (#47071135)

    And we still have to drink Sanka.

  • The nuclear and elemental particle physicists' message to God.

Never say you know a man until you have divided an inheritance with him.

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