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Exoplanet Count Peaks 1,000 116

Posted by Soulskill
from the drake-equation-still-looks-intimidating dept.
astroengine writes "The first 1,000 exoplanets to be confirmed have been added to the Europe-based Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. For the last few weeks, astronomers (and the science media) have been waiting with bated breath as the confirmed exoplanet count tallied closer and closer to the 1,000 mark. Then, with the help of the Super Wide Angle Search for Planets (SuperWASP) collaboration, the number jumped from 999 to 1,010 overnight. All of the 11 worlds are classified as 'hot-Jupiters' with orbital periods between 1 day and 9 days."
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Exoplanet Count Peaks 1,000

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  • by ls671 (1122017)

    More like 1000 e19 when the survey is over maybe?

  • Flags (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Thanshin (1188877) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @04:00AM (#45209959)

    And we still haven't planted a flag in every planes in our solar system.

    I find it sad that humanity stopped expanding as soon as it became a bit hard. And I don't think it's relatively harder now for us to expand than it was a thousand years ago.

    • by ls671 (1122017)

      And we still haven't planted a flag in every planes in our solar system.

      What you just wrote seems inappropriate.

      I find it sad that humanity stopped expanding as soon as it became a bit hard. And I don't think it's relatively harder now for us to expand than it was a thousand years ago.

      It didn't stop, it just got harder to spot for want to be watchers...

    • Nor are we likely to, in the name of Progress, since that really means keeping everyone on the plantation instead of getting off the planet.
      There just aren't any votes to buy off of the Earth, and where is the political power in that?
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      than it was a thousand years ago.

      There were people on every "corner" of the globe a thousand years ago. I assume that you prefer your history of a European imperialistic bent?

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      Reaching space isn't like crossing the Andes or the Atlantic, because those were crossings to hospitable environments. Expanding into space is like Columbus establishing a settlement on the mid-Atlantic rift.

      • Expanding into space is like Columbus establishing a settlement on the mid-Atlantic rift.

        ...except there's no food. Or water. Or air. Or radiation shield from Earth's magnetic field.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      dunno.. it took quite a while to expand white mans universe through all of americas. such a long while that space age is just a blip.

    • by Deadstick (535032)

      Where do you plant a flag on a gas giant?

    • by TWiTfan (2887093)

      I find it sad that humanity stopped expanding as soon as it became a bit hard.

      A bit hard? I like that, "a bit hard." As if all we need is a little *gumption* to settle planets with no oxygen, no atmospheric pressure, intense radiation, no water, no soil--all located at distances that would require months, if not years (if not LIGHT YEARS), of travel through the vacuum of space. Yep, just like our explorer forebears, all we need is to toughen up and grow some balls and the other planets will become the new West. Now, if we could just figure out how to live without any of the necessiti

    • by Grismar (840501)
      Shows what you know. And the dolts marking this "Interesting", I suppose.
    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      I find it sad that humanity stopped expanding as soon as it became a bit hard. And I don't think it's relatively harder now for us to expand than it was a thousand years ago.

      Dude, you read too much sci-fi and not enough sci-fu. A thousand years ago it was impossible for anyone to visit the Earth's poles, but even they had 1G of gravity and breathable air. No other planet or satellite in the solar system does. We're not talking about thousands of miles to the new world, we're talking millions of miles, in a

  • by KernyKat (721157) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @04:11AM (#45209993) Homepage
    To say the the count "peaks" suggests to me that the count has reached as high as it will go... which is nonsense!
  • "Peaks"? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Sockatume (732728) on Wednesday October 23, 2013 @04:11AM (#45209997)

    Are we expecting it to go down, and are the Vorlons or the Shadows responsible?

    • by Ihlosi (895663)
      Are we expecting it to go down, and are the Vorlons or the Shadows responsible?

      Whoever signed the Hyperspace Highway Development Plan 67-A-8437 is responsible. The Vogon construction fleet is just following that plan and can under no circumstance be held responsible.

    • I'm sure they meant "tops 1000". Or should it be "1000, tops"?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Peaks" implies that we are at a time between an increasing exoplanet count and a decreasing exoplanet count. I highly doubt that is the case.
    It would be better to use "stagnates at" if one wants to imply that we are approaching a maximum. If we are just talking about an arbitrary milestone for an ever increasing value it should have been "Exoplanet Count Reaches 1,000".

    In other news half empty and half full are not equal and which one is most optimistic depends on the desired final state.
    Very few "synonyms

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Ohhh what a nice round number it is, with all the zeros. It has to Mean something!

  • I really wish that one day I can visit another planet. :3
  • I heard in an astronomy talk last week that Kepler has proposed 3200 exoplanets of which 155 have been verified by alternative observations.
    Some reasons for verification:
    (1) 3rd periodic transit not yet observed (longer orbit candidates).
    (2) The Kepler CCD pixel contained multiple stars. Better telescopes are needed to distignusih which star has the plantet.
    (3) Some other pehnomena like a sunspot cause the dimming.
  • Puts me in the mood to read a little classic space travel. Some Asimov, or Heinlein, maybe. "These Thousand Worlds," a story of a galactic civilization hitting its stride as it colonizes it's thousandth planet, and the struggles it faces managing such a widespread and diverse collection of worlds.

    Yes, I know most of the first thousand here aren't habitable, but I can imagine we've found and colonized a thousand that are, one of these days.

  • The IAU has decided that a planet - at least around our Sun - has to "clear the neighbourhood" around its orbit. There will always be objects we can detect, without being able to detect if the neighbourhood is cleared (currently is all so-called exoplanets).

    One solution is that "planet" has a different definition between our Solar System and everywhere else. But that is inconsistent. What we should do is have the same definition everywhere; I suggest "orbiting star" and "so massive it's round". If th

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