Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Medicine Technology

Wi-Fi-Enabled Tooth Sensor Rats You Out When You Smoke Or Overeat 118

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the i-know-what-you-ate-last-summer dept.
Daniel_Stuckey writes "Researchers at National Taiwan University have created a tooth-embedded sensor that will catch you in an unhealthy act, whatever it may be, and lets your doctor know so he can shame you during your next checkup. The sensor consists of a tiny circuit that fits inside a tooth cavity and can be rigged into dentures and dental braces. The circuit is able to recognize the jaw motions of drinking, chewing, coughing, speaking, and smoking, and the results get sent directly to your doctor's smartphone."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Wi-Fi-Enabled Tooth Sensor Rats You Out When You Smoke Or Overeat

Comments Filter:
  • by ackthpt (218170) on Friday July 26, 2013 @04:52PM (#44394729) Homepage Journal

    Only fee more teef to pull.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I will pass on having my tooth hacked...by a dentist or hacker.

  • Why the doctor? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by canadiannomad (1745008) on Friday July 26, 2013 @04:59PM (#44394821) Homepage

    I think this would be 100x more effective if it just gave you a mild shock or direct feedback, instead of waiting for the rare doctor's (dentist's?) visit.
    Heck, even to my own smartphone would be better... No doctor needed to see a nice graph. Maybe some optional social integration for those who like to be socially encouraged to do better.

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      I think this would be 100x more effective if it just gave you a mild shock or direct feedback, instead of waiting for the rare doctor's (dentist's?) visit.
      Heck, even to my own smartphone would be better... No doctor needed to see a nice graph. Maybe some optional social integration for those who like to be socially encouraged to do better.

      I recommend the Ren Hoek approach to overeating - a fridge with a big padlock on it.

    • Re:Why the doctor? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by transporter_ii (986545) on Friday July 26, 2013 @05:05PM (#44394883) Homepage

      Or your insurance agent! Smoke one in the bar while drinking...rates go up on Monday.

      Let me be the first to say, HOLY CRAP.

      • by Agent0013 (828350)

        Or your insurance agent! Smoke one in the bar while drinking...rates go up on Monday.

        Let me be the first to say, HOLY CRAP.

        Rates going up is better than having your wife put into that room with the electro-shock floor and you have to watch it. (Ref: Cat's Eye)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      It's because most people have to pay for a doctor's appointment.

      The whole approach is ridiculous anyway, how it got past being on paper I don't know. I can only speak for myself when it comes to addictions, but it seems like people who act compulsively very often already feel guilt and shame, and lots of it...unless someone was desperate out of their minds I can't see how it would help to have their smartphones "shaming" them via pop-up messages. If they were that desperate being constantly reminded only of

      • In Canada I didn't pay for my doctor. While traveling I do, but I rarely have the same doctor twice...

        Well I could see this as kinda being like an early warning system.. "What you are doing isn't good for you." or "You are reaching the point of excess, slow down." This way you could receive feedback before it is a debilitating addiction or illness. Prevention rather than cure.

        • early warning system to get on the black list under the gop healthcare plan

      • by Dunbal (464142) *
        That is absolutely not the point of being a doctor - I certainly don't "guilt trip" my patients. I am a provider of information. I give them the information they need to make informed decisions about their health. What they choose to do is up to them, it really doesn't affect me one way or the other. Making your patients feel shame belongs to the old paternalistic model of medicine. That model is dead and buried, and has been for a long time. I'd hate to think there are colleagues who take joy in making som
    • by profplump (309017)

      But then how will we get the shame? Without shame from an authority figure how could you possibly change your behavior?

    • As if doctors and/or dentists can't already tell about your habits without a monitoring device. Are you obese? You are clearly eating unhealthy food! Are your teeth rotting out with cavities? Well a) you're probably not brushing correctly/enough and b) clearly you're having a lot of sugar.

      What the world DOES need is a monitor of your caloric intake, and a monitor of your burn rate. Summarize over the course of the day, show the net balance, and suddenly the world gets thinner.

      • by Dunbal (464142) *
        No, the world needs portion control, regular meals and snacks of healthy foods, and a complete avoidance of restaurants (who compete with each other to serve you the biggest portion to make you come back) and fast food chains. And more exercise. Unfortunately daily habits leave very little room or interest in those things.
    • by memnock (466995)

      "... Maybe some optional social integration for those who like to be socially encouraged to do better."
      Perhaps broadcast a msg to all the nearest hotties that you're eating like a pig or working on your cancer quotient?

    • Simulating a major toothache should get their attention.

  • by morcego (260031) on Friday July 26, 2013 @05:00PM (#44394829)

    And the practical reason for this is what, exactly?

    Do the doctor can tell them they shouldn't have done, something they already did, and already know shouldn't have?

    Maybe, just maybe, HMO and insurance companies could benefit from this but, the person? How exactly?

    • by Trepidity (597)

      A lot of people seem to sort of think of doctors as an authority figure who tells them not to do "bad" stuff. Maybe this product is trying to strengthen that view?

      Of course, it's not clear anyone asked the doctors if they want that role, or this addition information. What are doctors going to do with thousands of smartphone notifications about their patients doing dumb things?

      • As a physician, I constantly tell patients not to do things (or to do other things). Does that help? Not usually.

        Why do I persist in doing it? Not sure. There's a quote about that around here somewhere. Something about insanity....

        • by Dunbal (464142) *
          I'm a physician too. I tell my patients the consequences of continuing with their obesity, of not taking their medication, of eating improperly for their disease. That's our job. Whether they do it or not is up to them, I don't consider myself a "failure" if they choose to ignore me. I also know that a lot of colleagues go overboard. I remember a 78 year old man with antecedents of a parietal lobe stroke on his non dominant side, at least 2 previous myocardial infarctions, and prostate cancer. This gentlema
    • This is the New Economy 2.0. You are a product. Nothing benefits you, it benefits the corporations.

      This shift was bad for you. It was fantastic for Google, Facebook, etc., etc.

    • by xdor (1218206)
      Nationalized health care systems *fail* would like to control these types of personal activities since the individual's health care is subsidized.
      Take your pill citizen!
      • by AK Marc (707885)
        No, the national health care countries do not care what you do nearly as much as the non-national health care countries like the US do. The insurance companies are out to screw you. The government isn't (offer void in USA).
    • by SeaFox (739806)

      And the practical reason for this is what, exactly?

      Didn't you see the part about recognizing when you're speaking? With a little more work they can probably get it converted to a full-fledged listening device, and then have it send your communications right to the NSA. No need to partner with telecoms to get your conversation and risk leaks from disgruntled employees, and now you can't outwit them by staying off the phone or email.

      Only a tinfoil hoodie will protect you now, just don't go walking around in Florida wearing it.

      • And to think that at one time this [youtube.com] was believed to be paranoia. (Lard's "Can God Fill Teeth?" - an Al Jourgensen/Jello Biafra project)
    • by hairyfeet (841228)
      "Maybe, just maybe, HMO and insurance companies could PROFIT from this by having more excuses to refuse to give you what you paid for"...FTFY.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      The practical angle is for the doctor to report to their Obamacare superiors in the FedGov and arrest you for smoking or eating more than your "fair share"
    • And the practical reason for this is what, exactly?

      It has a vibration sensor, right in the jaw. It can listen to everything you say or whisper. Gives new meaning to "hiding a wire." Just wait for the the first spook^H^H^H^H^Hhacker....

    • by jamesh (87723)

      And the practical reason for this is what, exactly?

      Do the doctor can tell them they shouldn't have done, something they already did, and already know shouldn't have?

      Maybe, just maybe, HMO and insurance companies could benefit from this but, the person? How exactly?

      The person will benefit because the insurance company will offer lower premiums in exchange for having this device fitted and a clause that means they can opt out of covering any medical expenses that are a consequence of your overeating/smoking/etc. Of course your insurance company and you may have different interpretations of the word 'benefit'.

      Like any electronic device though it should be easy to destroy. Sticking your head in the microwave on high for 30 seconds should short it out.

  • Bluetooth
    You saw me drinking alone
    Without a dream in my heart
    Without a love of my own
  • If you read the actual PDF, the sensor is a full 1cm in length and all the power and support devices are wired up. They are a LONG way off from having this function is a real mouth. WiFi? Why not NFC? Who's going to fund something that looks like a razor blade embedded in a tooth to spy on the things you know you shouldn't be doing?
  • What sort of people get their teeth drilled often enough that this is an option? If you have good teeth, do you really want the unnecessary drilling to put this device in? Even if you have bad teeth, how often do you need those fillings replaced? Do you really want to take them out early just you can change the battery in this device?

    And then there is the problem of what happens if the device does not survive the hostile environment inside a human mouth and starts leaking whatever toxic chemicals it is m

    • by csumpi (2258986)
      There are people who go under the knife to enlarge/reduce/reshape certain body parts. So I doubt a little drilling will stop them.
  • use this shit as "justification" to deny people payments. And make it mandatory.
  • out of my teeth.
  • Or is this BrownTooth?

  • The next and best way to monitor communications!

    Perhaps it would be best to use this for people who are already at risk for tooth decay or health problems that warrant replacement teeth, but unless you work out a way to hook it up to a voice recognition device for dictation, it's worthless to me!

  • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Friday July 26, 2013 @05:17PM (#44395023) Homepage Journal

    Here's a jaw movement for it to recognize:

    "FUCK your bullshit surveillance state, you avaricious Stasi dog-fuckers."

    Seriously, I presume the installation will eventually become compulsory, since no person in their right fucking mind would ever, ever consent to having a goddamn tattler installed in their cranium.

    Up next: Neural sensor that can tell when you've committed a thoughtcrime, and wirelessly reports it to the proper authorities.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Compulsory? No. They'll just send your insurance costs through the roof/garnish your wages to near-nothing if you don't agree to comply. See? We knew you'd make the right choice. It's for your own good, you know, and think of how unfair it is to everyone else if you put more burdens on health care than you have to.

    • Up next: the next step up of this technology [slashdot.org]. Just identify the thought and remove any idea that you originally had it.
  • ...when I misread the title as "when you smoke or overheat". One little H turns it from a bizarre desire to know why people's mouths are overheating to an "anyone who would have this installed voluntarily is an idiot, and anyone who would allow it to be installed involuntarily needs a backbone installed as well."

  • I knew it! (Score:3, Funny)

    by nospam007 (722110) * on Friday July 26, 2013 @05:21PM (#44395059)

    As a certified paranoiac I relish reading such news, it makes me feel warm and cozy because I'm right after all, my teeth do phone strangers.

  • It would run out of power in the first 24 hrs..
  • I wonder how it does with the scanners in airport security? I can imagine trying to explain to some security official of a country I'm visiting why I have a transmitter installed in my head: "No, really - it's because I'm fat."
  • by Stele (9443) on Friday July 26, 2013 @05:55PM (#44395281) Homepage

    Just don't bite down on it too hard.

  • Doctor: "According to your readouts, you've been eating waaay too much ice cream over the last few months! Almost every night, and at some pretty odd hours too! Well, what do you have to say for yourself?"

    Patient: "Uhh...yeah. Ice cream...it was ice cream, for sure! Ah, sorry doc, will try to do better..."

    • by msobkow (48369)

      And your HMO.

      After all, that cigarette you snuck is grounds to cancel your policy.

  • And I'd get this why? Have we reached an age where we're expected to get microchip implants so people can monitor what we do?

    Fuck that.

  • The circuit is able to recognize the jaw motions of drinking, chewing, coughing, speaking, and smoking, and the results get sent directly to your doctor's smartphone."

    It would be much more useful to have a circuit to recognize CHOKING than smoking, and the market would be much larger....

  • It will explode with poisonous gas as soon as the sensor detects Duke Leto nearby!
  • That device does not seem very selective. It will catch someone chewing gum, but miss someone drinking sodas.

    IMO the more you chew, the better for your health. It means you consume real food

We will have solar energy as soon as the utility companies solve one technical problem -- how to run a sunbeam through a meter.

Working...