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Space Transportation Science

India's ISRO Successfully Launches 100th Mission 39

Posted by timothy
from the let's-go-ahead-and-call-it-the-space-age dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Five decades after a humble start to its space program, the Indian Space Research Organization has successfully launched its 100th mission. From the news article: 'Making history in its space Odyssey, India on Sunday successfully launched its 100th mission with its workhorse PSLV-C21 placing in orbit two foreign satellites in a flawless flight from the spaceport here. The third wholly commercial launch with no Indian satellite was a textbook mission as Indian Space Research Organisation's (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) placed in orbit French spacecraft SPOT 6 and Japanese micro satellite PROITERES some 18 minutes after lift-off at 9:53 a.m..' ISRO has so far launched 62 satellites, one space recovery module, and 37 rockets."
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India's ISRO Successfully Launches 100th Mission

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  • Being Pedantic (Score:4, Insightful)

    by pushing-robot (1037830) on Sunday September 09, 2012 @09:28AM (#41279433)

    I'm more impressed with how they managed 100 successful launches with only 37 rockets. Trebuchet-to-orbit isn't as easy as it sounds.

    • They probably used an ancient Indian technique [preetindersodhi.com] to accomplish that.
    • Re:Being Pedantic (Score:5, Informative)

      by ShanghaiBill (739463) on Sunday September 09, 2012 @09:52AM (#41279577)

      I'm more impressed with how they managed 100 successful launches with only 37 rockets.

      This is explained in the article. Each rocket launch is considered a "mission". Each satellite placed in orbit is considered a "mission". So if a rocket is launched with two satellites on board, that counts as three "missions".

      Maybe this mission counting system was devised by some ex-Arthur Andersen accountants.

      • Each rocket launch is considered a "mission". Each satellite placed in orbit is considered a "mission". So if a rocket is launched with two satellites on board, that counts as three "missions".

        What happens when a screw falls out in orbit?

      • This is explained in the article. Each rocket launch is considered a "mission". Each satellite placed in orbit is considered a "mission". So if a rocket is launched with two satellites on board, that counts as three "missions".

        Maybe this mission counting system was devised by some ex-Arthur Andersen accountants.

        Or maybe some of the people who worked at my previous employer, brought back with them the awesome ideas about software metrics we used :/

  • "Thank you for calling space launch control. If your main booster is malfunctioning please press '1'. For all other inquires please stay on the line and a representative will be with you shortly."
  • by Anonymous Coward

    "placing in orbit two foreign satellites"

    Aren't all their satellites foreign ? I mean they aren't American are they?

    But I suppose space is the next thing to be outsourced...

    • by PPH (736903)

      Interesting fact: In most of the world, 'American' is foreign.

  • ISRO: Using India's electricity to power or space program.
    -or-
    ISRO: You light your candles, while we light ours.
  • The more national organisations and other countries running successful space operations, the more chance all us geeks have a chance of our dreams to take a tourist package into space come true :-)

    More seriously - it's got to be a good thing that India can develop and manage its own space program, bringing its own researchers through and increasing its high tech industrial capacity. More space programs means more cross fertilisation of ideas across programs. Perhaps we are finally getting past the faltering

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Stiletto (12066)

      In twenty years, these "developing countries" are going to be the leaders in science and technology (if they aren't already), have mature, productive space programs and transportation systems, while the USA is still busy arguing whether evolution is the work of Satan himself or whether it's simply the work of the liberal elite.

      • the USA is still busy arguing whether evolution is the work of Satan

        You need to get yourself a passport and go out into the world and get some perspective. Americans may argue about evolution on talk radio, but Indians kill each other over this stuff. Thousands of Indians have died in religious violence in recent years. The USA may seem religiously extreme compared to Western Europe, but compared to the "developing world", not at all.

        • Re:Go India! (Score:5, Informative)

          by timeOday (582209) on Sunday September 09, 2012 @01:56PM (#41281237)
          Oooh, you're not kidding [bbc.co.uk]:

          People were asked which statements were closest to their own opinion about how evolutionary theories should be taught in science lessons in schools. The highest proportion agreeing that evolutionary theories alone should be taught was in India, at 49%, followed by Spain (42%).

    • by Anonymous Coward

      it's got to be a good thing that India can develop and manage its own space program

      The "India" part of the development needs to be taken with a grain of salt.
      If the "Indian" military is any indication, almost nothing in the "Indian" arsenal of planes, ships, missiles is actually "Indian" in origin.
      They have all been pretty much lifted intact from Russian, American, European manufacturers, often even manufactured outside of India, as India lacks the technological infrastructure even to kit-build many of these high-tech systems.
      You can start the list of deficiencies with India cannot yet ma

  • and here is my take on the proposed 2013 mars mission. I believe that it can be done, based on what others have done in the past. http://dissention.wordpress.com/2012/08/22/educated-speculation-on-indias-2013-mars-mission/ [wordpress.com]

The bomb will never go off. I speak as an expert in explosives. -- Admiral William Leahy, U.S. Atomic Bomb Project

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