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Sally Ride Takes Her Final Flight

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  • RIP Sally (Score:5, Interesting)

    by slasher999 (513533) on Monday July 23, 2012 @07:11PM (#40743295)

    I still remember that historic launch. Her name was one everyone who was old enough to remember knew and never forgot from that day forward.

  • true pioneer (Score:3, Insightful)

    by frovingslosh (582462) on Monday July 23, 2012 @07:14PM (#40743321)

    Sally Ride was a true pioneer and hero.

    I suspect that many if not most of the people who follow Slashdot don't believe in religious superstition. I find it truly unfortunate that someone would take advantage of her untimely passing and use it as an opportunity to preach his own religious views. And yes, I expect other supposedly "religious" people will now resort to name calling to mod me down rather than enter into discussion.

    • Re:true pioneer (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ClickOnThis (137803) on Monday July 23, 2012 @07:24PM (#40743417) Journal

      Sally Ride was a true pioneer and hero.

      I suspect that many if not most of the people who follow Slashdot don't believe in religious superstition. I find it truly unfortunate that someone would take advantage of her untimely passing and use it as an opportunity to preach his own religious views. And yes, I expect other supposedly "religious" people will now resort to name calling to mod me down rather than enter into discussion.

      As she literally flew, if you will, to "the heavens" during her lifetime, I see nothing wrong with suggesting metaphorically that she's doing it now for the final time. Yes, the imagery is religious. But it seems to fit the situation well.

      Goodbye, Sally.

  • Rest well Sally (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ravenswood1000 (543817) on Monday July 23, 2012 @07:27PM (#40743437)
    Rest well Sally. Sorry you passed away because of such a horrible condition. You did good maam.
    • by Kittenman (971447)

      Rest well Sally. Sorry you passed away because of such a horrible condition. You did good maam.

      Well said. Condolences to her family, who have lost a remarkable lady.

  • by adisakp (705706) on Monday July 23, 2012 @07:53PM (#40743669) Journal
    I found out reading her obituary that she had a partner of 27 years, a fact that - despite her status as an American Hero - was not publicly announced until after her death.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 23, 2012 @08:14PM (#40743861)

      Except she wasn't (publicly) a lesbian when she rode the shuttle. She was married to Steve Hawley (another astronaut). They married in 1982, she got her seat on the shuttle in 1983. She got together again with Tam O'Shaughnessy in 1985 (they were childhood friends), and she divorced Hawley in 1987. I would suspect that the marriage to Steve Hawley was more a political move (on her part, at least) to dispel any question within NASA about her sexuality and secure her position as the first American woman in space. Had she been an admitted lesbian in 1983, I seriously doubt she would have gotten her shot to go into space. The fact that she left NASA the same year she divorced Hawley lends credence to the possibility that the revelation of her sexuality (at least, internally within the organization) ended her space career.

      • by rubycodez (864176)

        So she was also the first U.S. lesbian in space; but was she the first lesbian in space? Who was the first gay man in space, or has that happened yet?

      • by arth1 (260657)

        She was married to Steve Hawley (another astronaut). They married in 1982, she got her seat on the shuttle in 1983. She got together again with Tam O'Shaughnessy in 1985 (they were childhood friends), and she divorced Hawley in 1987.

        "Ah, gentle dames! it gars me greet,
        To think how mony counsels sweet,
        How mony lengthen'd, sage advices,
        The husband frae the wife despises!"

    • I cried a little when I heard she died.

      Then I read about her having a "partner" and cried a little more. I would have loved to have her fly me to the moon. Dang.

    • by Swampash (1131503) on Monday July 23, 2012 @09:54PM (#40744661)

      Ride's partner of 27 years, Tam O'Shaughnessy, will be denied federal benefits because the Defense of Marriage Act says that was an unrelationship, not like the real relationships that good Christian hetero real Americans have.

      U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!

    • by adisakp (705706)
      Here is an article with some quotes from the family [buzzfeed.com]:

      Bear Ride, talking with BuzzFeed, said today, "We consider Tam a member of the family."
      And, I hope the GLBT community feels the same," Bear Ride, who identifies as gay, said.
      "I hope it makes it easier for kids growing up gay that they know that another one of their heroes was like them," she added.

      The aritcle seems to imply that Sally's sister Bear is gay as well.

  • by decora (1710862) on Monday July 23, 2012 @08:40PM (#40744101) Journal

    god i fucking hate cancer.

  • in my less angry mode, i remember talking about salyl ride when i was a kid. these were real people we could look up to. i dont know if they have a name for that kind of idealism of youth but i still think it is worth something, even after all we have been through and all we have learned about our own failures and mistakes as a species.

  • by sageres (561626) on Monday July 23, 2012 @08:48PM (#40744189)

    The first woman in space was Valentina Tereshkova. She flew on June 16th, 1963. That was two years after the first man flew into the space.
    On the other hand, the first American woman (Sally Ride, RIP) flew in 1982.
    Question: Why did it take NASA almost two decades to send the woman in space?

    • The first woman in space was Valentina Tereshkova. She flew on June 16th, 1963. That was two years after the first man flew into the space. On the other hand, the first American woman (Sally Ride, RIP) flew in 1982. Question: Why did it take NASA almost two decades to send the woman in space?

      Answer: At that time it was still very much a male dominated society in the U.S. Ms Ride shattered that way of thinking then, made a lot of then male-chauvinists begin to think, 'differently'. She knowingly 'rode an untested controlled bomb', in the search of knowledge. That is quite a brave feat that many males would have been too afraid to do. Gotta' respect that

    • by arth1 (260657) on Tuesday July 24, 2012 @01:12AM (#40745759) Homepage Journal

      The first woman in space was Valentina Tereshkova. She flew on June 16th, 1963. That was two years after the first man flew into the space.
      On the other hand, the first American woman (Sally Ride, RIP) flew in 1982.
      Question: Why did it take NASA almost two decades to send the woman in space?

      While part of the answer undoubtedly is misogyny and discrimination against women in general, part of it is a cultural taboo - female plumbing. Female cosmonauts used diapers, and thought little of it. Female astronauts probably would have (not alluding to the one that did) if male-dominated NASA hadn't spent millions and countless years on designing a space toilet and non-intrusive "devices" to let women pee in space.

      • According to the movie, "The Right Stuff", John Glenn had to get permission from Houston to pee in his spacesuit, but it took quite a while to finally get the aok to do so, worries about short circuiting the spacecraft.
  • Fly in peace Sally.

    Now cancer cannot touch you.

    Your dream will live on with younger generations, thanks to your books and Sally Ride Science.

    Peace!

  • First American woman in space, she also served on both the Challenger and Columbia disaster investigation committees. She was not outspoken about her personal life but spared no effort so that future endeavors into space might be safer.

    We are all sorry for her family's loss.

  • by Xilinx_guy (551837) on Monday July 23, 2012 @09:23PM (#40744419)

    I met Sally (briefly) at JPL, after her 1984 Challenger mission. My impression was of someone who was confident, supremely able, and didn't worry a lot how she dressed. I got this impression since she showed up at the lab wearing shorts, and seemed instantly at home, like she'd been working there for years. Her later partnership with Tam was a surprise, since she gave no hint of that during her astronaut years. But yes, getting a ride on the big machine in the early 80's was a very political game, as much about appearances as it was about ability. And ability she had in spades. During the October 84 Challenger mission, all kinds of shit went wrong. An RF antenna cable on the radar overloaded and started arcing, causing the SNR to radically drop. The monitoring equipment at Johnson acted up, showing loss of TDRS downlink data when it was actually fine. I also seem to recall that Sally had to take apart parts of the shuttle with a wrench to get access to the data recorder, because of some malfunction or other. So overall, the mission was a disaster. But Sally took it all in stride. Best wishes, Sally. Some of us remember you.

    • by Erbo (384)
      I also got a chance to meet Dr. Ride, at a function for city government officials in the mid-80's, after her flight but before Challenger died. (My father, city manager of Poway at the time, took me.) She signed my copy of The Space Shuttle Operator's Manual.

      Now the Shuttle is gone, and so is she. Sigh. Clear skies to you, ma'am.

  • The cat food can (Score:5, Insightful)

    by andyring (100627) on Monday July 23, 2012 @10:12PM (#40744775) Homepage

    Wow. I'm honestly quite surprised at what is a fairly high level of vitriol over what people choose to believe or not believe from a religious standpoint. C'mon, people. Can't we just let someone hold their religious beliefs without going out of our way to mock and deride them because you think you know better?

    Ponder your cat. It has it's own world, it lives life freely, is fairly intelligent. It can plan, make decisions, etc. And yet it is not remotely possible for that kitty to understand, when you open the cat food can, how that food got there. All kitty understands is that you open the can and the food is simply there. Kitty's mind is not able to comprehend how that cat food came to be created, how it was packaged, labeled, transported, sold, etc. Kitty's brain isn't capable of understanding it. To kitty, it's not even a known unknown, it's an unknown unknown (to use some military/war/intelligence terminology).

    Why couldn't us mere humans be the same way? Why couldn't there be a God or similar being whose entire existence completely and totally transcends ours? I realize that *could* open the face-two-mirrors-at-each-other paradox, but lets set that aside for the moment. To put it simply - just because you cannot conclusively prove that a God does not exist DOES NOT mean that God doesn't exist.

    • by gumpish (682245)

      To put it simply - just because you cannot conclusively prove that a God does not exist DOES NOT mean that God doesn't exist.

      Russell's teapot [wikipedia.org]

      To put it simply - just because you cannot conclusively prove that an invisible Bob Newhart is not trying to steal your brain DOES NOT mean that he isn't.

      • If you cannot prove it, he very well could be. This is one of the known unknowns as GP put it. There are many things that go well into unknown unknowns territory.
         
        And do you realize you did not disprove GP's post (I suspect you believe you did), but just stated that the opposite could be possible too.

    • Why couldn't us mere humans be the same way?

      There are humans that are exactly the same way. Look up Wikipedia for cargo cult.

  • An awful shame when somebody dies that young.

    Anybody know if astronauts are markedly more susceptible to illnesses like cancer due to greater exposure to radiation outside of the Earth's atmosphere?

    Or is the increased exposure in their few days out of the atmosphere pretty insignificant in terms of increasing the chances of cancers etc. developing compared to their various exposures in 60 years plus of living inside the atmosphere?

"Ahead warp factor 1" - Captain Kirk

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