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Medicine Science

Erasing Details Of Bad Memories 135

Posted by Soulskill
from the will-it-work-on-the-star-wars-christmas-special dept.
An anonymous reader writes "People can be trained to forget specific details associated with bad memories, according to breakthrough findings that may lead the way for the development of new depression and post-traumatic stress disorder therapies. New study (abstract), published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, reveals that individuals can be taught to forget personal feelings associated with an emotional memory without erasing the memory of the actual event."
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Erasing Details Of Bad Memories

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Rohypnol: that's soooo 2001.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      How happy is the blameless vestal's lot!
      The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
      Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind
      Each prayer accepted and each wish resigned.

  • Slashdot? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    What the hell's that?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:09PM (#40418399)

    AHHRHRHHRHAHGHGHGHGAHGHGHGHG

  • Midazolam (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:10PM (#40418403)

    The drug Midazolam [wikipedia.org] (trade name Versed) is already used to induce anterograde amnesia before certain unpleasant medical procedures. This is used where the effects of an anesthetic are undesirable or impossible.

    Sometimes this causes problems - it is often abused by the health care industry to sometimes horrific results. In the worst cases, people are put through what can only be called torture under the assumption that the drug will block their memories of the event, and even though their conscious memories of it are gone later, they suffer PTSD type symptoms after the fact. The tales of people who've had bad experiences in that regard are bone chilling. This isn't universal of course, and used judiciously the drug has beneficial uses. But it is not always used wisely.

    Also, there is some evidence it can cause permanent or semi-permanent memory impairment in the elderly, as it interferes with the mechanisms of memory formation.

    • Re:Midazolam (Score:5, Interesting)

      by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:34PM (#40418503) Homepage Journal

      under the assumption that the drug will block their memories of the event, and even though their conscious memories of it are gone later, they suffer PTSD type symptoms after the fact.

      This sounds like wildly incompetent malpractice then. Even if you're going to get 'routine' major surgery with general anaesthetic you should insist on a spinal block for pain. The anaesthetic blocks out frontal lobe consciousness and some memory formation, but other parts of the brain are going, "holy fuck, I'm being sawn in half!" which leads to major brain trauma and long-lasting problems. Ever know somebody who came out of surgery 'changed'?

      Docs at Walter Reed have been on the forefront for a while, because screwed up soldiers are expensive. But regardless of their cost cutting motivations, this should be well known in anaesthesia by now...

      • by Khyber (864651)

        "This sounds like wildly incompetent malpractice then"

        And you're speaking from what authority? Let me see your MD. I had to have some pretty bad surgery (I'm a huge chunk of titanium on the right side of my skeleton) and I've got some problems emotionally from that. This is fairly typical, speaking among other patients that underwent similar trauma surgeries.

        You ever have to have MAJOR surgery after being dead, TWICE?

        • Don't depend on me, I've just related what I've read in articles. I cited the authority already - call the docs at Walter Reed who study this if you need to see an MD degree.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        "Docs at Walter Reed have been on the forefront for a while, because screwed up soldiers are expensive."

        And the above doctors have had stunning success, right ?

        That must be why the US has lost more soldiers to suicide than to enemy action.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          That must be why the US has lost more soldiers to suicide than to enemy action.

          Really? I didn't know that. Could you please provide some references?

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by r0ball (1848426)
            Wow....googled this and it appears to be somewhat right: apparently more soliders killed themselves than died in combat in 2010 [www.good.is]
            • by mSparks43 (757109)

              News you won't find on CNN or Faux.

            • by Anonymous Coward

              That doesn't necessarily translate to a bad scenario. Suppose because of their effectiveness zero casualties were the result of combat, but that soldiers were as likely as members of the general public to commit suicide. I'm not saying that's the case, but a higher suicide than casualty rate could possibly be taken to be "a good thing."

            • Re:Midazolam (Score:4, Insightful)

              by TheRaven64 (641858) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @07:15AM (#40420011) Journal

              That article quotes a suicide rate of 468, from an armed forces contingent of 1.5M or 3M if you include reservists (which the 468 figure does include). That means that 0.015% of the US military commits suicide, which puts them at around 15 times the national average. That doesn't necessarily imply a causal relationship. Several reasons come to mind immediately why they would be expected to have a higher suicide rate than the general population:

              Most people in the USA who commit suicide do so with a firearm (around 60%). This is one of the easiest ways of killing yourself because it lets you do it quickly - giving you less time to reconsider - and is believed by most who do so to be a painless way out. At the very least it's quick.

              The second reason is that a lot of army recruitment material talks about giving people a purpose or direction in life. As such, I'd expect a significant percentage of people who feel they have nothing to live for to join up (as is a recurring theme in fiction) and, if the army then fails to provide them with something that they consider to be a worthwhile purpose for suicide to seem like an attractive alternative.

              Finally, there's the obvious correlation between high-stress occupations and suicide...

              • by Sara Chan (138144)
                Suicides in the military are most commonly due to domestic personal matters: the soldier's spouse being unfaithful back home.
      • by r0ball (1848426)

        Even if you're going to get 'routine' major surgery with general anaesthetic you should insist on a spinal block for pain. The anaesthetic blocks out frontal lobe consciousness and some memory formation, but other parts of the brain are going, "holy fuck, I'm being sawn in half!" which leads to major brain trauma and long-lasting problems.

        Fortunately for those of us who've undergone major leg surgery with general anesthetic, I don't think there's much evidence out there of the occurrence of "major brain trauma and long-lasting problems" from not having also had a spinal block. I'd be interested to read any actual evidence you can provide to support your statement.

        • by mug funky (910186)

          additionally, spinal blocks are difficult and don't always work so well. the anaesthetists are fixated about spinal health, for obvious reasons. they're shooting blind for a tiny area, and if they fuck up, they fuck you up.

          my wife's spinal block wasn't so pretty - it came out patchy, there was still feeling in blotches well below the block. when they turned the dosage up, the block went so high it was in danger of shutting her breathing down.

      • Re:Midazolam (Score:4, Interesting)

        by demonlapin (527802) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @12:35PM (#40421553) Homepage Journal
        I'm a practicing anesthesiologist in the United States. My first job out of residency was running a day surgery center that was over 50% orthopedics. I understand the treatment of surgical and postsurgical pain. I know how to create a proper balance of analgesia (pain relief) and anesthesia (loss of response to surgical stimulation) and amnesia (not remembering things you'd just as soon forget).

        It sounds to me that you have been told about a very common method for dealing with pain after joint replacement and assumed that it was a generally good plan for most anesthetics. It's not. Here's why.

        That "spinal for pain" is - when we're talking about joint replacements - usually 200 micrograms of morphine. It's not a "spinal anesthetic", which would be a local anesthetic agent like bupivacaine or lidocaine injected into the fluid around the spinal cord in order to make someone surgically numb; instead, it's there to work on the receptors in the spinal cord that prevent pain from being transmitted upward. As a downside, it does cause itching in the majority of people. You can't give them to people who are taking blood thinners (there's a risk of a hematoma developing in the epidural space and causing paralysis if it's not noticed and corrected in time). You can't use it for outpatients, because it does carry a risk of respiratory depression. Patients who get it can't have a patient-controlled-analgesia (the press-a-button-for-morphine pump) for the first 12-24 hours.

        For those who are having arm/shoulder or foot/ankle surgery, a peripheral nerve block is by far the superior choice, but there are certain cases where it can't be used, and others where the risk-benefit balance means it's not worthwhile. In the military, they often leave catheters in place to pump local anesthetic into the peripheral nerve block for a couple of days, but they have the benefit of people who are under regulations and meet certain minimum standards. In private practice, most insurance companies won't pay for one, and I don't trust most people to use them correctly even if they were paid for - you can really, really mess someone up with one if it's not managed correctly, and my experience with epidurals (which are the most common place in which continuous infusions of local anesthetics are used) has shown me clearly that a large portion of people just don't understand the idea of not ever moving or disturbing the place where the catheter enters the skin.

        BTW, most people who come out of surgery "changed" are those who have been on cardiopulmonary bypass. It's a known risk.
    • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

      by FrootLoops (1817694)

      During one of my dad's heart surgeries, they kept him semi-conscious with Versed. He curses the person running the anesthesia to this day for not giving him enough Versed since he remembers much of the procedure, including the doctors discussing how much energy to use to shock his heart out of fibrillation.

      That said, I wonder if using too little Versed is sometimes the culprit in the PTSD type symptoms you're discussing (which my dad has, for that procedure and other reasons).

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by datavirtue (1104259)

      You don't need drugs to do this. It's called the Science of Compassion.

      http://www.amazon.com/Walking-Between-Worlds-Science-Compassion/dp/1889071056 [amazon.com]

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsGl-XIWM5Y [youtube.com]

      Looks like crazy shit until you give it a chance and realize that it is not about the messenger and his crazy hair, but about a more rational and evolved way of treating life in one's mind.

      Just sayin'

      • I gave the video 11 minutes and never got past the "crazy shit" stage. He seems to ramble from one irrelevant line of thought to the next while only rarely getting to a point that's somewhere between mildly insightful and rather trivial (eg. people tend to feel the emotions they see in others, as when a crowd gets fired up by a frontman; he gave no example, I supplied this one). By far his most important asset as a speaker is his extremely calm, almost otherworldly delivery. It dresses up his lackluster con

    • Holy Crap!

      I lost an entire week last year (post-op) because of Versed. In defense of my surgeon (and prescribing doctor), I now believe that it is a GOOD THING that I can't remember any details.

      I was initially upset about the "loss", but now feel indebted to my doctor. The time I "lost" was well worth not having to remember what transpired. I came to this conclusion after discussing the events with my spouse, other family members, and hospital staff.

      I don't *think* I have any PTSD from the experience.

    • Had it for a follow-up orthopedic surgery where they had to ask me how it feels (beyond just it hurts). Don't remember it.

  • by oheso (898435) on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:18PM (#40418427)
    We would never lie to you. Your tax burden is decreasing in real terms. You like our candidate. War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      And the weekly chocolate ration has been increased to 20 grams!!!!

    • by Velex (120469) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @12:25AM (#40418915) Journal
      Oh good god. Fuck your smug, comfy-ass bullshit.

      Do you know how much it scares the shit out of anyone living with me when I wake up screaming, even after the fourth or fifth time?

      So I'm not a veteran and I wasn't abused or anything like that, but it doesn't change when my ex-father attacks me and starts breaking every bone in my body and I wake up screaming. The only reason my subconscious won't let go is because I actually trusted and thought I loved that fundamentalist, racist, delusional, conspiracy-theory-loving piece of crap for 18 years, and then he broke that trust.

      Veterans need this. You think Goatse or Two Girls One Cup can't be unseen?

      I just wake up screaming every now and then if I haven't had my dose of b33r after a couple days. It's nothing more than that.

      I don't even know what real post traumatic stress syndrome is like. I've never seen someone killed, and I've never had to kill someone or be killed myself.
      • That was abuse. (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        So I'm not a veteran and I wasn't abused or anything like that, but it doesn't change when my ex-father attacks me and starts breaking every bone in my body and I wake up screaming.

        That was abuse - very severe physical abuse.

        It's quite smart of you to not want to base your identity on being a victim and wallowing in your past, but then again, I don't think you shouldn't be afraid to call it for what it was.

        • by Calydor (739835)

          Sounds more to me like he's describing events in a dream, not actual events in his past. That's not to say his ex-father didn't at one point beat him up, the rest of the post suggests that may have happened, but he wasn't suffering daily physical as I understand it.

  • I'd say the Don't Think About Pink Elephants test soundly contradicts the Autobiographical Think/No-Think procedure. And the basis for their scientific results is each subject's emotional response And I saw nothing to indicate that the study involved actual PDST patients, despite the article's scarcely related photo. .
    • by sjames (1099)

      That's why it took some time to figure out. Instead of the obviously un-workable, they have you come up with an emotionally charged (for you) word that makes you think of pink elephants and then they pair that with an emotionally neutral word.

  • by BluPhenix316 (2656403) on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:21PM (#40418441)
    Ok I originally was just going to say something goofy about this but this does have my concerned a little bit. I am a soldier in the US Army and PTSD is a really bad thing. It affects a lot more people than even the media is portraying. The thing is though, most people who get it easily "cope" with it by just talking about the event with people they feel understand it. From that point they use those hard emotions to do positive things. Atleast in the military, they usually become trainers for other people, or even invest that time in artistic ways. This all depends though on the severity of the event. The trend i'm beginning to notice though is that most of the more severe cases of PTSD i've ran across in the military are usually attached to something else though. I'm sure something like this could really benefit the more serious cases of PTSD. On the other hand, for the less serious cases people have acutally used those emotional memories to fuel positive change.
    • by Seumas (6865)

      The first thing to be concerned with is that we no longer call it "shell shock". That's what people used to call it. But, gosh, that just sounds so harsh and brutal. It's far more comfortable (especially for those of us who don't experience it) to call it something like "post traumatic stress disorder". See, that way it sounds more like something you get from working hard on a project with a quickly approaching deadline that you can prescribe squeezing a stress-ball and taking long walks through a garden to

    • EMDR has already shown efficacy for PTSD and at least one study has strongly implied EFT works too.

      A colleague of mine, Andrew Austin, teaches an expanded model of EMDR called IEFT. He found something very interesting: that flashbacks were not to moments where eg the sufferer saw their friend die but rather to a moment where they felt responsible, where they wish they'd made a different choice. Typically, this was on an irrational basis where the eg a different choice would probably have made no differen

  • Memory sickness (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    "The Khmer Rouge invented new terms. People were told to "forge" (lot dam) a new revolutionary character, that they were the "instruments" (; opokar) of the ruling body known as "Angkar" (, "The Organization"), and that nostalgia for pre-revolutionary times (chheu satek arom, or "memory sickness") could result in execution."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmer_Rouge#Language_reforms

  • .. also Total Recall.
  • by __Paul__ (1570)

    This sounds very much like the beginning of the saga in Hugh Howie's Wool/Silo [amzn.to] series...

    (slight spoilers ahead) ...humanity develops drugs that, in combination with stressful events, allow memories to be suppressed. Unpleasantness follows...

  • Risking apathy? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by gmuslera (3436) on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:32PM (#40418493) Homepage Journal
    Our emotions attached to memories is what makes us give them a meaning, a value. Take out that you liked or disliked something and it wont be good or bad, or tasty, or fun. Misused could be as bad as the problem it tries to solve.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      As someone who worked hard in middle school to get rid of all his emotions (due to bullying, depression, worthlessness, etc...) I wouldn't recommend it. Everything is so-so for me. Should I pick this activity over that one? I can't say. One is never better than the other. Why do you want to try XXXX? Because I do... I can't give a reason, I can't say that I enjoy it because I don't. I can't say that I don't want to do that other activity because I don't like it, because I don't. It's difficult to

      • by UpnAtom (551727)

        You can't get rid of emotions that way. You're undoubtedly suppressing them, which isn't as bad as it sounds.

        What I'm saying (as a psychotherapist of 16 years) is that you have the opportunity to learn to feel them again as well as resolve and thereby 'delete' the negative ones.

        Just an option. And yeah, school sucks.

  • by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Friday June 22, 2012 @10:40PM (#40418521) Homepage Journal

    PTSD is reassuring for me in a way - if humans were truly naturally murderous beasts, as some would like to insist, PTSD would be very rare or non-existant. But it isn't, and we're not built for heinous acts - more bonobo than chimp, as it were.

    The trick is, if PTSD is 'curable' then there are even fewer consequences for sending in men to do terrible things to other people. We're already learning that the lower the domestic cost of war is, the more politicians engage in it. I don't want veterans to suffer, but this is all headed in the wrong direction.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by cfalcon (779563)

      Rofl fantastic. You're opposed to medicine because it will make people more willing to fight as well, right?

      Violence is morally neutral. Like all tools, it is how you use it.

      • Rofl fantastic. You're opposed to medicine because it will make people more willing to fight as well, right?

        If you look up at the subject line, it says that it can be both good for the individual and bad for society. That's a point of moral ambiguity, not opposition.

        Violence is morally neutral. Like all tools, it is how you use it.

        Right, which is why I wrote that it's unfortunate that it's being used to make war more palatable.

        • by cfalcon (779563)

          War is morally neutral too- again, like violence, you can have just or unjust wars. If you are a pacifist, say so, but it doesn't excuse being opposed to medicine because it will ease the suffering of individuals that you personally don't approve of.

          I mean, do you fucking think for ONE GODDAMNED SECOND that the people in charge are like "well, no, we don't want to go to war, because our soldiers may experience PTSD". You think that's holding them back? It's not like THEY are the ones to make that sacrif

          • it doesn't excuse being opposed to medicine

            Yeah, that's the second time you've tried that. I don't think anybody at home is going to be confused by conflating the two issues. In case you really don't get it I'll try again: it can't be the right thing to do to treat the individual, but it's still bad for society.

            mean, do you fucking think for ONE GODDAMNED SECOND that the people in charge are like "well, no, we don't want to go to war, because our soldiers may experience PTSD".

            There are absolutely politi

            • it can't be the right thing to do to treat the individual, but it's still bad for society.

              err ... sloppy editing/proofreading. Sorry 'bout that. Once more:

              it can be the right thing to do to treat the individual, but also still bad for society.

              there, almost valid English.

          • by beguyld (732494)

            Abolition of suffering is always moral.

            Not necessarily. As a trivial case, think of allowing children to reap the natural results of their actions. Removing the suffering in the short term can be extremely harmful to someone in the long term. So some context is needed. Often well-meaning removal of short-term suffering can make things much worse over the longer term. The last 20 years or so of child-rearing theories have resulted in a lot of self-centered brats and parents pandering to 3 year old tyrants. That is most certainly NOT going to serv

      • Hey there soldier! Worried about PTSD? Afraid your conscience may interfere with your patriotic duty? No need to worry! With our new treatment you'll never have to worry about flashbacks, or fear that you may have to turn whistleblower. War-crimes trials? No fear. We'll make sure you will always be the most reliable and entirely truthful un-witness.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      PTSD doesn't only apply to soldiers. It can occur after any traumatic event, whether the patient is an auto accident or a victim of a violent crime. In a previous story, doctors and therapists are able to, on a case by case basis, remove the emotional content of the memory of the traumatic event and lessen the crippling psychological symptoms. This is a good thing, whether or not it applies to soldiers and war.

    • by dan14807 (162088) * on Saturday June 23, 2012 @12:43AM (#40418971) Journal

      PTSD is reassuring for me in a way - if humans were truly naturally murderous beasts, as some would like to insist, PTSD would be very rare or non-existant.

      Read On Killing [amazon.com]. Only psychopaths can kill without emotional consequences. People are naturally opposed to killing when it comes to dealing with members of the same species. Men can hunt and kill a deer. That's instinct. When confronting other humans, the instinct is to posture or submit. Same applies to most other mammals.

      • Read On Killing

        Thanks. Just added it to my list.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Dude, this is just evil. If you're opposed to a particular war, deal with that in the voting booth, and accept that sometimes your side is going to lose. Don't take it out on soldiers with PTSD, who are fairly powerless in this situation. Do you also think there's a moral problem with the use of medicine to heal soldiers' physical wounds, because a higher body count would help build opposition to a war you disagree with? I'm sorry, that's unpatriotic and evil.

      • > If you're opposed to a particular war, deal with that in the voting booth,

        That reminds me of that old cliche:

        The 5 boxes of liberty: The Soap Box, the Mail Box, the Ballot Box, the Jury Box, and the Ammunition Box. Please use them in that order.

    • I'm definitely no expert on this, but I've heard from people who claim to know what they're talking about that PTSD has nothing to do with being freaked out by killing others, and everything to do with the fear of your own death or the fear of a loss of control over your own life. Not sure how the two things can be separated, but apparently they can, and no one seems to have any problem with killing, as long as they feel it's justified . It's the immediate exposure to death that makes you think of your own
  • Lot's of booze. Not really kidding, of course the PTSD flashbacks are a bitch at times.

    • Flashbacks happen because the events are not integrated. The person who experienced them did not have the emotional or mental framework with which to process them.

      What I find more curious is the people who shot numerous guys in the head when they had no idea why they were really doing it and who now live their life proud of the fact.

      I have met these people, and you would not be able to tell they did this unless they told you. You wouldn't even guess them the type of person who would.

      • by Sentrion (964745)

        There's a reason why the armies of the world prefer to field the youngest soldiers to the harshest conditions of the front line. This has been true for all history. Give a 16, 18, or 20 year-old a gun and tell him he's a hero, and he will charge against all hell and fury if you tell him to. Armies that don't care about civil rights, the Geneva Convention, or public opinion prefer even younger soldiers. After a little more time to mature, men in their 30's and 40's tend to be much less enthusiastic about

  • and third, and fourth, and...

    --Zsa Zsa & Liz

  • Bet Taco'd be happy if I forgot: "The Lone Gunman are Dead."

  • I hope they don't plan on lumping this into a treatment for depression. Althouh I do remember bad things more than good thigs I can't say its memories that make me depressed. I just am. Have been since I turned 21. This may help some people I would think. Certainly not everyone.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    My wife has severe PTSD due to being sexually assaulted by a doctor as a child, and is constantly trying to find better ways to cope and heal now that she's an adult. There are a LOT of victims (as shown yet again today by Joe Pa's trial) that could benefit from therapy like this if it could be effective for even severe trauma like that. Wired had an article about the idea of a pill [wired.com] to help you forget, but this article appears to be more just about therapy than medicine. Unfortunately it also says it was do

  • Not to turn this into a book review, but I just started reading the sequel to the Wool series of books by Hugh Howey called First Shift - Legacy, and the concept of purposefully forgetting things is pretty central to the book. Very good reads, both of them.

  • by SlithyMagister (822218) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @12:15AM (#40418873)
    I have always been like this.
    I do not remember anything bad that happened to me.
    I can be reminded, and when I am, I remember them in sufficient detail, but in general, I just plain don't.
    One of the the greatest blessings of my existence.
  • I'm glad that the rest of the psychology community is catching up. We've been doing this with NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) for at least a decade. Just look up NLP and trauma.
  • Alcohol (Score:4, Informative)

    by CAIMLAS (41445) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @01:27AM (#40419081) Homepage

    Meanwhile, this is really nothing new: Alcoholics figured it out thousands of years ago. Mastadon trample your kids? The chieftan fucking your wo-man? The bastards in Sales pissing you off? Great, have a fucking drink.

  • So, that's what the GOP has been putting into the water.

  • by jsh1972 (1095519) on Saturday June 23, 2012 @04:41AM (#40419573)
    In early 2010, my wife and I were living in the asshole of the world (port Arthur, tx), when one night a woman (I use that term loosely here) came by the house around 1 am with three men she had been riding around and smoking crack with. Hearing a knock on the door, I went to see who it was, as soon as I was unlatching it because I recognized her, the three other guys rushed in and started what turned out to be a marathon torture fest/home invasion robbery. I was pistol whipped severely,threatened with homosexual rape, forced to watch as my wife was actually raped, beaten so severely my skull has a four inch fracture on the back of me head. Finally they stomped me into unconsciousness, and left. Their take? A busted up msi lappy with a cracked LCD.shortly after, we changed cities. There are still nights that I lay awake, every little sound I hear outside is in my mind them having found my new home and come for retaliation (charges were pressed- aggravated assault, they had priors, bye bye)... I'll lay awake for hours imagining them flanking my house, rushing in through front and rear doors and proceeding to fuck my shit up big time. Do I still suffer from the experience? Of course. Would I erase memories of it? Not necessarily, who knows, I might revert to my former trusting self and get fucked over again. It's not fun to have to assess strangers as potential threats before anything else, but I have a very healthy feel for people with hidden agendas now.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by SternisheFan (2529412)
      Firstly, my sincere congratulations, and respect, to you and your wife, for surviving that ordeal. I won't go into my story here, no need. You two were able to see justice via the court system, an ordeal in itself, not every innocent victim gets to have that chance, and that outcome. When bad things happen to people, you are no longer the person you once were, you are now changed forever by the experience. No going back. My advice: Theres a lot of good in this life, though sometimes you need to look fo
    • by UpnAtom (551727)

      To echo some of what the other guy said, you've been through a truly horrible experience and I'm genuinely sorry about that. You probably feel responsible even though anyone would do the same in your position.

      It's not wrong to mostly trust people you know. This kind of thing happens rarely.

      With the right kind of help, you can end some of these symptoms. I'd treat you and your wife for free if you're able to get to England.

      Congratulations for putting them behind bars.

  • Reminds me a bit of Reiki practices (cultish quack medicine some relatives are caught up in). They word it in pseudo-scientific crap, but trying to change the emotional baggage associated with memories seems to be an important part of Reiki (but again, I only have tangential experience).

  • Therapists have been doing this Neuro-Linguistic Programming for decades at this point.

    What is old is new again?

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