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Google Science Fair Back For 2nd Year 31

Posted by samzenpus
from the fire-up-the-volcano dept.
alphadogg writes "Google, joining forces with CERN, The LEGO Group, National Geographic and Scientific American, has announced the 2012 Google Science Fair, an online competition open to 13-to-18-year-olds around the world. Prizes include a $50,000 college scholarship, a 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands and more. Judges include Google VP and Internet pioneer Vinton Cerf, CERN Director Steve Myers, oceanographer Sylvia Earle and others."
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Google Science Fair Back For 2nd Year

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  • by Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) on Thursday January 12, 2012 @05:47PM (#38678640)

    "....top 3 2011 Google Science Fair winners -- all girls -- were recognized for innovations."

    Apparently girls can do science too!

    • by DarkIye (875062)

      I think they were probably just remarking on something statistically unusual.

      • by Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) on Thursday January 12, 2012 @06:13PM (#38678884)

        How so?

        That all three are of the same sex? I'm fairly sure he wouldn't have made the distinction if it where three boys. My supposition aside, 3/3 isn't that statistically interesting.

        That there aren't that many women interested in science? He'd have to qualify that.

        That there aren't many women who are smart? That's just plain bizarre.

        Without a point or qualification, it's just patronising fluff.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          It's not patronizing, you're misinterpreting. It's pointing out how awesome it is.

          It's not that girls aren't interested, or that they aren't smart. It's that they are often told they can't do it. Boys, rather than girls, are constantly encouraged to go into STEM related fields.

          But things are changing, and that is why it is worth mentioning. Not that long ago this wouldn't have happened. This Science Fair was actually pretty evenly split between genders, and it is a sign that gender equality in these fields

        • by syousef (465911)

          That there aren't that many women interested in science? He'd have to qualify that.

          Certainly my experience. From my observation women just don't tend to get passionate about science. Sorry if that's politically incorrect but everything from science classes, science clubs to the workforce - even when there is a significant (often misguided reverse sexism) attempt to address the imbalance - I see few women who "get it" when it comes to being passionate about science. When they do get interested, I don't think they are at a particular advantage or disadvantage.

        • How so?

          That all three are of the same sex? I'm fairly sure he wouldn't have made the distinction if it where three boys. My supposition aside, 3/3 isn't that statistically interesting.

          Maybe you're missing the point. A lot of males are surprised that women can do anything other than have babies (with the assistance of males). But fear not - any evidence to the contrary will quickly fade from their memory to be replaced with the handpicked "proof" of the "understanding" or "their" world.

          The world is full of morons. Cue the "pictures as proof" posts by the gene pool rejects. The sort that stupidly trot out terms like "patronizing" when they feel some "woman" is lecturing them. (which would

        • It is statistically unusual. No matter how much you want to scream from the top of a mountain that girls are equal in everything, females statistically do not become scientists. Look at the general percentage of male scientists to female scientists. It's not that they're incapable of science, that they're dumber, or any nonsense like that, it's just that far more men get into the field then women for a degree of personal reasons. Whatever it stems from doesn't take away from the fact that girls dominating a

        • by beckett (27524)

          That there aren't many women who are smart? That's just plain bizarre.

          I read the article and figured this was written to encourage even more girls to be interested in science.

          It's interesting how much perception is really projection.

    • by Baloroth (2370816)

      Well, in the 13-18 year old category, this isn't surprising. Guys are usually more interested in... well, in the practical aspects of biology during that period.

      Or leveling up their Chaotic-Good Drow Rogue.

      • Well, in the 13-18 year old category, this isn't surprising. Guys are usually more interested in... well, in the practical aspects of biology during that period.

        I'm quite sure that many boys in that age would gladly take the chance to study ovaries in great detail and take prize money for that.

    • by greenlead (841089)
      Did they -- consciously or unconsciously -- give them extra points for being female? I've often seen in coed organizations that if a male and female or competing for a similar award (a job, bonus, etc.) and have the same qualifications, the female will often win it because it looks better for the organization ("LOOK! We have females in high positions here!").
  • this is an very interesting article. in my opinion google is the greates innovator on the web.
  • ToS? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by CanHasDIY (1672858)
    By entering into this contest, you agree that all research and/or invention submitted becomes the intellectual property of Google, and that any and all profits made from the sale of said research/invention, past present and future, will be paid directly to Google.
    • Re:ToS? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Fastolfe (1470) on Thursday January 12, 2012 @10:46PM (#38681626)

      Is this a question or a statement? Because this does not appear to be part of their terms at all.

      • by Amouth (879122)

        you should read the rules for the doodle 4 google contest - aimed at art for kids K-12

        http://www.google.com/doodle4google/rules.html [google.com]

        Some of my favorites:
        "By participating in this Contest, you agree and hereby grant Google permission to use, copy, modify, distribute, and publicly display your Contest submissions for any purpose, such as, but not limited to, press and media communications, without any compensation or attribution to you. You also agree to participate in any media or promotional activity regard

  • by superid (46543) on Thursday January 12, 2012 @11:22PM (#38681940) Homepage

    Ok slashdotters, I've had no luck getting this question answered elsewhere so I might as well try here. My son is very interested in coding. He's competent in Java and he's picking up c quite well. He's taken an interest in GPU programming and I know over the next year he will do OK with those concepts too (I've been able to get both OpenCL and CUDA code up and running). In other words, we've got the computer end of a sci fair project pretty well established. The problem is that while I know generally what bioinformatics is all about, I have no background or resources in the appropriate biology to help him find a worthy project.

    Ideally, what he wants is 1) a bioinformatics problem with a large data set (yes I realize that is redundant by definition) 2) one that would benefit from GPU programming 3) a problem that makes some kind of physical testable prediction that could be tested.

    Last year a kid (from Canada?) did a drug interaction study where he took candidate compounds and determined where on a protein they would attach. From that he found two compounds that could mate at the same time because their locations did not interfere. Thus increasing the effectivity. He actually clinically tested "his" drug on cells. Pretty impressive. I'm not expecting my son to reach that level but I'd like to find something real world and challenging that couples computer science with a physical biological process.

    any input is greatly appreciated! gary.huntress@gmail.com

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