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Google Medicine Earth United Kingdom Technology

Google Maps, Disease Risk, and Migration 34

Posted by timothy
from the paywalls-are-a-disease dept.
First time accepted submitter ecorona writes "This Google Maps mashup was published in Science (paywall warning) this week. It shows genetic risk for multiple diseases distributed across the globe. It's easy to follow the migration path and see which diseases increase/decrease in risk along human migration paths. Click on the populations to see the relative risk of the selected disease for each population. You can pick your a disease and see which populations are more susceptible. The article is behind a paywall, but the website is free to use." On a similar note, an anonymous reader points out a British research project that "used Twitter to track and map flu-like illnesses across the U.K. to determine if epidemics were emerging. The research culminated into an online visual tool, the Flu Detector, that maps tweeted flu rates in several regions across the U.K."
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Google Maps, Disease Risk, and Migration

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  • Google also has a flu trends mapping: http://www.google.org/flutrends/us/ [google.org]
  • by mentil (1748130) on Saturday November 05, 2011 @11:50PM (#37963096)

    Many diseases have flu-like symptoms, and most uneducated people who have any of those diseases would tweet that "they have the flu" without being tested or consulting a doctor, and those false positives would be picked up by the software.

    • by Belial6 (794905)
      Around here, we have the opposite. No matter what is wrong with you, if the doctor cannot easily tell you what it is, the standard answer is "You have the flew". Unless you meant that the doctors were the uneducated people.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Except their methodology doesn't say, "Oh, there were two million Tweets of the word 'flu' so there must have been two million cases of influenza." Sure, many, even possibly most, people Tweeting or searching for "flu" aren't actually going to have the flu, but you're still going to be able to see a relative increase in that sort of activity during a genuine outbreak, and you can use that correlation to show some sort of relative outbreak intensity, even if just from that data you couldn't actually translat

  • by Anonymous Coward

    As an American, it's interesting that when this site talks of "migration" it pretty much means the older migrations to what is now Latin America via the land bridge. I know I've heard stories of certain European or African populations having genetic disease, and that being carried over into the US. Judging from the maps I'd guess this study takes a wider view, rather than express the realities of more recent migrations. (I'm no biologist, but this has to be interesting. The amount at which people travel

  • Well, nerds of European descent...

    The genetic risk of alcoholism and extroversion from 23andMe [23andme.com]:
    http://spittoon.23andme.com/2011/10/21/genes-and-geography/ [23andme.com]

    And more along the lines of the original story:
    Parkinson's and BCC [23andme.com]

  • by Ofloo (1378781)
    This to be expected, .. the higher the live expectancy, the worse the gene pool becomes, .. in 3rd world countries people with bad genes are probably not surviving, .. due to missing medical treatment, .. so countries where live expectancy are higher, people do tend to get kids at an older age, and a lot of people with bad genes survive and are allowed to reproduce, .. I'm not saying there should be bans I'm just suggesting this is obvious, .. and everyone can come to this conclusion. And this got nothing
    • This to be expected, .. the higher the live expectancy, the worse the gene pool becomes, .. in 3rd world countries people with bad genes are probably not surviving, .. due to missing medical treatment, .. so countries where live expectancy are higher, people do tend to get kids at an older age, and a lot of people with bad genes survive and are allowed to reproduce, .. I'm not saying there should be bans I'm just suggesting this is obvious, .. and everyone can come to this conclusion. And this got nothing to do with bad habits. like alcohol, smoking, or whatever.

      High life expectancy is not not in itself bad genetically though is it. It just gets normally screened out before you get to reproduce.

  • Where's the data? Has no-one migrated past Indonesia?

I'd rather just believe that it's done by little elves running around.

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