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Neanderthal Sex Boosted Immunity In Modern Humans

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  • Old news? (Score:4, Funny)

    by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Saturday August 27, 2011 @04:23PM (#37229696) Homepage Journal
    I'm sure this knowledge was a big influence on who Mrs. Ballmer chose as a mate.
    • by aliquis (678370)

      If it boost the amount of developers I'm all for it.

    • by mangu (126918)

      I'm sure this knowledge was a big influence on who Mrs. Ballmer chose as a mate.

      Are you saying that his mate was trying to boost his/her immune system?

    • by couchslug (175151)

      It also accounts for the robust constitution of Trailerparcus Bubbacus to this day.

  • by Haedrian (1676506) on Saturday August 27, 2011 @04:26PM (#37229732)

    Want a better immune system for your kiddies?

    Call me.

    • by Dogtanian (588974)

      Want a better immune system for your kiddies? Call me.

      Unlikely... she knows that if you were really Neanderthal, you'd probably be using the phone to bash someone's head in, and you wouldn't even have a clue about the Internet. :-)

      • Re:Hey Babe (Score:4, Funny)

        by guruevi (827432) <evi@@@smokingcube...be> on Saturday August 27, 2011 @08:48PM (#37231372) Homepage

        Or you'd be really mad about the Geico commercials.

      • by Lanteran (1883836)

        Joking, but Neanderthals had larger brains than modern humans, actually.

        • by retchdog (1319261)

          which means very little in and of itself.

          • by Lanteran (1883836)

            True, it's mostly due to increased bulk- but if a neanderthal were to exist today, he or she probably wouldn't be any less intelligent than an average person. Probably a bit more due to evolutionary pressures in the ice age.

          • soooo the stereotype of neanderthals as hyper violent aggressors doesnt really fit the data?

            wouldnt that stereotype be more applicable to, i dont know, us?

        • Joking, but Neanderthals had larger brains than modern humans, actually.

          And an IBM 700 mainframe is larger than a modern i7 desktop. What's your point?

          • by Lanteran (1883836)

            *facepalm*

            My point is that they'd most likely be about as intelligent as an average human.

            • by Kittenman (971447)
              Tut tut. Nonsense. Intelligence isn't linked to brain size. If it was we'd all be roughly equally smart. Not the case. I think there's been weights and measures done of dead peoples' brains (rather than live peoples' ones...) and the size varied up and down, not consistently with the IQ or whatever measure you choose.

              Similar to another part of (male) anatomy, it's not size of your hook, it's what you do with it.

  • we are on internet, aren't we?

  • those DNA strands are awesome!

  • 1) Very good Saturday night entertainment. Not sure what I'd do without "Stupidest Criminals 3"...

    2) Very good opportunities to take home a hot chick at the bar. Let all the idiots use the nauseating "Hey Babe, lets better our future children's immune systems.." pickup line and better your opportunities to take home that hot chick at the bar

  • In high school and college, the women who slept with all the guys who _looked_ like Neanderthals were the ones most likely to have disease. I always thought they were slutty, but apparently it was some sort of inborn behaviour to improve our resistance as a race.
    • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

      In high school and college, the women who slept with all the guys who _looked_ like Neanderthals were the ones most likely to have disease.

      In some cases though, it worked out.

      I never understood why my wife ever willingly married me. Our beautiful daughter, who has a very robust immune system, appears to embody the explanation. That and my indisputable oily Guinea charm. Think Jersey Shore's "The Situation" with a PhD in literary theory.

      • by Dogtanian (588974)

        I never understood why my wife ever willingly married me. Our beautiful daughter, who has a very robust immune system, appears to embody the explanation. That and my indisputable oily Guinea charm.

        Perhaps she found your "Guinea charm" to be cute? [homestead.com]

        Either that or she was impressed by your life savings of £1.05? [wikipedia.org]

  • Way back when, the aliens landed. they needed a work force, but the locals (neanderthals) were too stupid, and the alien's genetically made workforce, kept dying to diseases.

    So they spliced/mated their work force with the neanderthals to make, well, us.

    hmm, i wonder if i get a really bad hair do, i can get on an episode of Ancient Aliens...

  • by MindPrison (864299) on Saturday August 27, 2011 @04:47PM (#37229904) Journal

    ...that I should have sex with my neighbors?

  • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Saturday August 27, 2011 @04:53PM (#37229950) Journal
    Apparently, one of the major upsides of sex(from a darwinian, rather than purely recreational, perspective) of the not-intuitively-all-that-sensible arrangement of having to seek out a conspecific, risk sexually transmitted infection, and mate simply in order to reproduce, is the rapid genetic diversification you can achieve by recombining genomes with others. Your asexual organisms have it much easier; but they have to depend on mutation(or, as with some bacteria, quasi-sex genetic exchange mechanisms).

    The neat organisms, in my opinion, are the edge cases that can go either way. this piece [nih.gov](sorry about the paywall...) examines snails that can either reproduce sexually or spawn clones asexually. As it turns out, in areas with higher parasite loads, the snails resort to sex at much higher rates in order to keep abreast of the parasite threat, while the less pressured snails go for the rapid and low-risk strategy of asexual cloning.
    • by mapkinase (958129)

      Bacteria experience HGT via phages. So if one can say that sex can lead to sexually transmitted diseases, in bacteria diseases (phages) can lead to disease-transmitted sex.

  • by alewar (784204) on Saturday August 27, 2011 @05:00PM (#37230008)
    some months ago there was a study proposing that black people do not have Neanderthal ancestry. do they have a different immune system?
    • by bcrowell (177657)

      some months ago there was a study proposing that black people do not have Neanderthal ancestry. do they have a different immune system?

      Yes. Click through to the BBC News article.

  • I can has your sweet sweet genes?
  • plague, aids, flu, tuberculosis, pneumonia and any other deadly disease
  • by BoRegardless (721219) on Saturday August 27, 2011 @05:37PM (#37230250)

    I've often wondered about some families I've known with continual health problems.

    I have considered that maybe they did not inherit sufficient "protection" or DNA to give them resistance to certain viruses, fungi and bacteria or maybe more properly the ability to generate such resistance.

    Given the article's credit to interbreeding amongst early groups and the variations in today's populations of ancient DNA traces, I am wondering more about my hypothesis.

    We humans are very diverse indeed; it is more than skin deep.

  • Is it just me, or does /. has a real obsession getting to the bottom of Neanderthal Sex research? I search "Neanderthal sex" in the /. search and come up with 11 stories since 2005 (listed below). But when I search for conventional term "heterosexual marriage", all I find is a single story on "world of warcraft"... go figure.

    Neanderthal Sex Boosted Immunity In Modern Humans 56

    Neanderthal Genes Found In All Non-African Populations 406

    New Ancient Human Identified 148

    Neanderthals "Had Sex" With Modern Man

    • by Empiric (675968)

      Probably innate. Slashdot is largely pro-atheism, and subconsciously, if not consciously, the average subscriber knows they need to deal with the "human" versus "animal" differentiation issue at some point, as naturalism gives them no basis to create a distinction.

      Naturally, failure to have a justification for differentiation has tremendous ethical implications, of which sexual behavior is one. A nagging pull toward an issue that would be unremarkable except for one's own psychological inconsistencies is

      • by epyT-R (613989)

        There is no differentiation between animals and humans. humans are animals, albeit a specific kind. The morality we use to treat others of our specie vs other species is an evolved behavior. Morals are based on feelings and feelings are based on instincts.

        • by dzfoo (772245)

          You kind of proved his point. News for nerds, indeed. Stuff that matters to nerds.

                  -dZ.

          • On the contrary your completely logic free, ad hominen post just demonstrates that you're only an ignorant animal that reacts to arguments you don't like only with insults. You lose.

    • To learn about Neanderthal sex we have to look at our DNA. This is completely in the realm of science - hence it is news for nerds.

      On the other hand, heterosexual marriage is commonplace. The evidence for this surrounds us all the time and can be seen with our own eyes. This is neither news nor nerdy. And why do you make the connection between sex and marriage anyway? That seems to be outside the scope of the article.

    • by Culture20 (968837)

      I search "Neanderthal sex" in the /. search and come up with 11 stories

      Now try Google without the family filter. I bet you get more than eleven.

    • i agree. slashdot has a clear bias against christian conservatives. it goes further than the 'ban on jesus' though. there is also the fact that it tends to discuss stories on Linux to the exclusion of products made by Christian corporations like Microsoft. We all know that Jesus believed in Capitalism - and obviously slashdot is some kind of Marxist plot to destroy both.

  • . . . and then divorced you after having the kids.
  • ...for this very reason, and that's been known for some time.

    • by xelah (176252)
      Except that opposites don't attract. People generally choose similar partners.

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