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Google and Slooh To Broadcast Lunar Eclipse 50

Posted by samzenpus
from the dark-side-of-the-moon dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Today Google and Slooh, the online Space Camera, are broadcasting a live online feed of the total lunar eclipse starting at 2:00 PM EDT. The live feed can be accessed at Slooh's Mission Interface and also as a featured video stream on Google's channel on YouTube. Live audio narration by astronomy experts will accompany the live feed. This online astronomy collaboration will allow people all over the world to watch this rare celestial event."
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Google and Slooh To Broadcast Lunar Eclipse

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  • Dark Side of the Moon. Some good headphones. I'm there!
  • Given that this eclipse will not be visible in North America, that's good news.
  • . . . of anyone actually getting to view same after it gets touted on /. must be pretty low.

    . . .click . . . reload . . . reload . . . reload . . .
  • Gesundheit!
  • I wouldn't have considered lunar eclipses all that rare.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      From the Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_2011_lunar_eclipse)

      "This is a relatively rare central lunar eclipse where the center point of Earth's shadow is on the disk. The last time a lunar eclipse was closer to the center of the earth's shadow was on July 16, 2000. The next central total lunar eclipse will be on July 27, 2018."

    • by treeves (963993)

      This.
      If I counted correctly there were 82 total lunar eclipses in the twentieth century, so nearly one every year on average. Some years actually had two, but there were many gaps greater than one year.

      • by arunce (1934350)
        I have seen at least 3 or 4 full moon eclipses last 15 years.
      • Re:Rare? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by QuasiSteve (2042606) on Wednesday June 15, 2011 @02:10PM (#36453280)

        The rarity is in actually getting to see it. For most of North America, it's on the wrong side of the planet right now.

        For large parts of Europe, cloud cover is ruining things.

        So while there may be one almost every year, the number that you could see from your location is much lower, and the number that you actually -can- see, due to clouds or fog or whatever, is lower still.

        • by treeves (963993)

          True, but when one says something is not rare, one usually refers to the existence not being uncommon, not my ability to witness it.
          Example: jury trials are common occurrences, but I've never seen one myself except as portrayed in movies and TV shows. I would not say jury trials are rare because I haven't seen one.

    • by Threni (635302)

      Sounds a bit dull to me. Some things just don't translate that well to a computer monitor.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Why did they wait until the day of the event to announce it? Thank god for slashdot!

    • Eclipse schedules are known decades or even centuries in advance, and they are available on hundreds of sites all over the 'net. Here's one [kwathabeng.co.za]
  • At least it's not Apple behind this. They'd be announcing an iEclipse(tm) of the iMoon (tm). And it would be pay per view.

  • "Google to initiate lunar eclipse"
    • by jc42 (318812)

      "Google to initiate lunar eclipse"

      What I'm looking for is the flame wars over what effect this eclipse will have on global warming (oops, I mean climate change), whether Obama or Bush (or God) is responsible for the moon going dark, and the many other such threads that infest most discussions here.

    • by chemicaldave (1776600) on Wednesday June 15, 2011 @02:57PM (#36453752)
      He just disclosed that Buzz Aldrin's urine bag in one of his boots broke when he took his first step on the moon. Poor guy.
    • From TFA: "Nationally renowned astronomer Bob Berman will host the four-hour spectacle with live audio narration starting at 2:00 PM EDT/11:00 AM PDT. He will be joined by several guests throughout the show, including Duncan Copp, a presenter for BBC and National Geographic and director-producer of many astronomy films and TV shows including "In the Shadow of the Moon", an award-wining film about the Apollo astronauts."
  • Tuned into the live you tube feed....it's riveting. Kinda like Bob Ross [wikipedia.org] and his happy trees announcing for The Masters [wikipedia.org].

    oh...and good job on the app....I'm watching it on my XOO....oh wait...I'm not....can't get the app on the XOOM. Stupid unsupported devices. Stupid fragmentation
  • The live feed as well as Google's YouTube Homepage is down. That's hilarious.

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