Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Idle News Science

"2012" a Miscalculation; Actual Calendar Ends 2220 600

Posted by samzenpus
from the lost-in-translation dept.
boombaard writes "News is spreading quickly here that scientists writing in a popular science periodical (Dutch) have debunked the 2012 date (google translation linked) featuring so prominently in doomsday predictions/speculation across the web. On 2012-12-21, the sun will appear where you would normally be able to see the 'galactic equator' of the Milky Way; an occurrence deemed special because it happens 'only' once every 25.800 years, on the winter solstice. However, even if you ignore the fact that there is no actual galactic equator, just an observed one, and that the visual effect is pretty much the same for an entire decade surrounding that date, there are major problems with the way the Maya Calendar is being read by doomsday prophets." I wonder what Amazon's return policy on a box full of 3 doomsday wolves shirts is?

*

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

"2012" a Miscalculation; Actual Calendar Ends 2220

Comments Filter:
  • Assuming... (Score:5, Funny)

    by tool462 (677306) on Monday October 26, 2009 @02:58PM (#29875615)

    Assuming all the conspiracy theorists can be convinced it's true, at least this means I'll be dead before this idiocy crops up again.

    • by Philip K Dickhead (906971) <folderol@fancypants.org> on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:14PM (#29875819) Journal

      Funny.

      According my reading of the calendar - it's right here on the wall, in my office - the whole thing goes tits-up, Dec 31, 2009!

      • Re:Assuming... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Hojima (1228978) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:20PM (#29875893)

        Your post is incredibly relevant considering that the Mayan calendar simply starts over at that time rather than predicting the end. The Apocalyptic prediction from the calendar was simply speculation that arose from not knowing the language. There's not exactly a Mayan Rosetta Stone so even all that we know about the language is still premature.

        • Re:Assuming... (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Torodung (31985) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:24PM (#29875951) Journal

          Yup. It's the Mayan Y2K bug. Good thing their calendar is based on mechanical circles. People discussing a 2012 apocalypse are discussing where a circle begins and ends.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by Anonymous Coward

            the mayan calendar, is actually a replacement calender, and 2012 is the year we replace our current one. this is due to the realization of galactic time. This is like an expansion pack, to the current reality perception. The calender will predict, galactic plasma integrations and the overall understanding of how the machine of the universe works, will cause a great awakening. This awakening to galactic time will also be accompanied by alien communications, animals telepathing with humans, and telepathic aw

          • by adrenaline_junky (243428) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:23PM (#29876719)

            Uh-oh, this is going to be a big problem for the United States since our entire fiscal policy is to deficit spend and avoid really solving any problems until the planet explodes in 2012. It is going to be mighty embarrassing when the debt collectors come a knockin' in 2013. "There's nobody home, go away!"

          • by Chris Burke (6130) on Monday October 26, 2009 @05:11PM (#29877485) Homepage

            Look, I don't know about any apocalypse or anything. I just know 2220 is a long time to wait for the LHC to come online!

          • Re:Assuming... (Score:4, Informative)

            by buchner.johannes (1139593) on Monday October 26, 2009 @07:36PM (#29879073) Homepage Journal

            And not the first circle, but the 13th: from http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4093 [skeptoid.com]

            Mayans had three calendars. They had a solar calendar that was 365 days long, and a ceremonial calendar that was 260 days long. These two calendars would synchronize every 52 years. To measure longer time periods, they developed the "long count" calendar, which expressed dates as a series of five numbers, each less than twenty; something like the way we measure minutes and seconds as a series of two numbers each less than sixty. And, just in case this might seem too simple, for some reason the second to last number was always less than eighteen. The first day in the Mayan long count calendar was expressed as 0.0.0.0.0, and by our calendar, this was August 11, 3114 BC. Every 144,000 days (or about every 395 years, which they called a baktun), the first number would increment, and a new baktun would start. Recall how we all got to enjoy the excitement on the millennium of watching the digital displays roll over from 12/31/1999 to 1/1/2000? Well, that's what's going to happen on December 21, 2012 to the Mayan calendar. It's going to roll over from 12.19.19.17.19 to 13.0.0.0.0, just as it has done each of the previous twelve baktuns. There's no archaeological or historical evidence that the Mayans themselves expected anything other than a New Year's Eve party to happen on this date: Claims that this rollover represents a Mayan prediction of the end of the world appear to be a modern pop-culture invention. It's true that the Mayan carvings of their calendar only depicted 13 baktuns, but what did you expect them to do? Carve an infinitely long calendar every time they wanted to express a date?

          • Re:Assuming... (Score:4, Interesting)

            by jc42 (318812) on Monday October 26, 2009 @09:14PM (#29879821) Homepage Journal

            Yup. It's the Mayan Y2K bug. Good thing their calendar is based on mechanical circles. People discussing a 2012 apocalypse are discussing where a circle begins and ends.

            Pretty much. And it's even stupider than that.

            The 2012 date is when the Mayan base-20 calendar overflows from (as the common translation to decimal notation would say) 12.19.19.18.4 to 13.0.0.0.0. The 5-digit date is actually 3 years plus a 2-digit day withing the year; that's why that funny 18.4 is the end of a year. 18*20+4=364, which is the last day of the year if you start counting at zero as the Mayan calendar does. (They ignore the extra .24 day in the solar year, so their New Year day slowly drifts over the centuries.)

            Overflowing to 13.0.0.0.0 is sorta like our year overflowing to 2000/1/1, of course. But it's obviously not the end of the calendar; that will be at 19.19.19.18.4, some 2400 years later. And even then, the Mayan calendar doesn't really end. There are some old inscriptions implying that the 5-digit date was considered a truncation, and it should have 2 or more likely 3 more high-order digits. So people using the Mayan calendar will just have to stop dropping 3 digits, and use at least one more. So 19.19.19.18.4 will be followed by 1.0.0.0.0.0, which will look sorta cool on the stelae that will no doubt be erected to celebrate the occasion.

            Anyway, even with 5 digits for the year instead of 3, we have a few million years until the calendar runs out, and if 6 digits is the correct length, the Mayan calendar will probably outlive our species.

            Base 20 numbers do use a lot fewer digits than base 10, especially when you get to big numbers.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          There's not exactly a Mayan Rosetta Stone so even all that we know about the language is still premature

          This is not entirely correct, as there are still Mayan speaking persons in south mexico. (I bet there's also several in Guatemala). By the way, I had a teacher in HS that has mayan blood in his veins. His brothers (that still live in mexico) published a mayan-spanish dictionary in the 90's.
          • Re:Assuming... (Score:5, Informative)

            by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:48PM (#29876225)

            Nor did they disappear. Mayans can still be found on any day on the Yucatan peninsula selling hammocks, fixing cars, running banks, building roads and so on. A little tour outside of Merida will show you people still living in sturdy houses made entirely of native materials. The Mayans, although occupied, are still largely alive and well.

          • Re:Assuming... (Score:5, Informative)

            by jeffasselin (566598) <cormacolinde@NOSpam.gmail.com> on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:49PM (#29876243) Journal

            There are people that speak something that descends from the mayan language, correct. That doesn't help us much in deciphering the written version of the language in hieroglyphics.

        • by Kozz (7764) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:59PM (#29876367)

          There's not exactly a Mayan Rosetta Stone so even all that we know about the language is still premature.

          Oh, I think that if you'd consulted Dr Daniel Jackson, you may have received a more informed opinion.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by GlassHeart (579618)

          There's not exactly a Mayan Rosetta Stone so even all that we know about the language is still premature.

          My understanding is that much of the Maya glyphs have been decoded. Check out the rather fascinating PBS program Cracking the Maya Code [pbs.org] for details.

        • Re:Assuming... (Score:5, Informative)

          by Monkeedude1212 (1560403) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:15PM (#29876583) Journal

          We can go ahead and blame the Spanish for that. There are only 3 books containing Mayan Text still around today, all the rest were burned because they could contain "Heresay" (No one bothered to translate. Burn first ask questions later).

          All of our calendars, even modern day ones, are just based off of Astrological occurences. We use 365 days for our Calendar because thats how long it takes the Earth to rotate around the sun. What if we decided to use different Stars and not the Sun?

          Well basically the Mayan Calendar does this - They just use alot positions of Constellations to determine where they are in their cycle.

          And as an educative side note: Without knowing yesterdays, todays, or tomorrows date, the current day of the week, Month of the year, or what year it currently is, one could still find out the date by simply measuring the stars position, and knowing the movement of the stars, and knowing what the sky looked like on ONE other night, and knowing the date that other night is occuring on. Time should be pretty precise too, as the stars move. It's fun to calculate what the sky will look like 3 months from now, and then see how accurate you are (with a bit of research)

          • by LandDolphin (1202876) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:21PM (#29876693)

            It's fun to calculate what the sky will look like 3 months from now, and then see how accurate you are (with a bit of research)

            We must have different ideas of fun.

          • Re:Assuming... (Score:4, Insightful)

            by lawpoop (604919) on Monday October 26, 2009 @05:58PM (#29878169) Homepage Journal

            ...all the rest were burned because they could contain "Heresay"

            Heresy.

            (No one bothered to translate. Burn first ask questions later).

            I think it was a pretty safe assumption that Mayan texts weren't going to be talking about salvation through Christ and the Holy Roman church. I don't agree with the burnings, but I don't think the Spanish erred in assuming they were going to find heresy in the texts.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              ...all the rest were burned because they could contain "Heresay"

              Heresy.

              Unverified, unofficial information gained or acquired from another and not part of one's direct knowledge
              = Hearsay

              Opinion or doctrine at variance with the orthodox or accepted doctrine, esp. of a church or religious system.
              = Heresy

              Unverified, unofficial information that may or may not be at variance with accepted doctrine, but that we'll never know for sure because it was all burned
              = Heresay

              Information verified to be false and at variance with all other accepted doctrines but that still keeps coming back af

      • by CarpetShark (865376) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:55PM (#29877243)

        OK. In exactly which direction should I be pointing my telescope when things go "tits up"?

    • by Presto Vivace (882157) <marshall@prestovivace.biz> on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:19PM (#29875887) Homepage Journal
      has run a lot of dubious programming. This was one of the things they were actually pushing.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by c6gunner (950153)

        Yep, they do have the occasional lunacy. I was rather disgusted when I saw them pimping the "crystal skulls" fraud. Still, they're nowhere near as bad as the History channel.

        • by eln (21727) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:55PM (#29876321) Homepage
          Pretty much all of the so-called "educational" channels have degenerated into non-stop conspiracy factories, showing garbage like "Decoding the Da Vinci Code", Nostradamus prophecies, and nonsense about ghosts around the clock. The History Channel, which had already degenerated into the Hitler Channel, is now more like the "Conspiracies about Hitler and the Occult" channel. Discovery's entire family of networks is bad too...there's something seriously wrong when the most educational show a so-called educational channel has is Mythbusters.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Dahamma (304068)

            Wow, your post is of the few times Godwin's Law has been invoked for a valid point rather than a blatant troll...

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by mcsqueak (1043736)

            Pretty much all of the so-called "educational" channels have degenerated into non-stop conspiracy factories

            Yeah, tell me about it. I don't give a rip about ghosts, demons, Jesus, or any of that other stuff. Give me science and engineering shows! Things like "Monster Machines", "Biggest Suspension Bridges Ever Constructed", "World's Largest Skyscrapers" etc. are at least mildly entertaining and teach me about something real and tangible that I didn't know much about before.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by mcgrew (92797) *

            It's sad, Discovery Channel used to be almost all about science. Now it seems to be all about pseudoscience. Still, the History Channel delves into that tripe as well, but they do actually have some history, too -- and science. There's a show called The Universe that's good, Wild West Tech was good (probably cancelled since Carridine died), there's Heavy metal, etc. There was a history of hillbillies yesterday, and there was an excellent show a few months ago about the history of beer.

            They were doing JFK to

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Hatta (162192)

      I was looking forward to saying "Told you so" on 12/22/2012. But they always find a way to weasel out of their crazy predictions.

    • by Rei (128717) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:33PM (#29876055) Homepage

      ...was that I got halfway through the article before I realized I was viewing it through Google Translate. Yeah, I wasn't paying much attention. And yeah, I had noticed some errors -- but my mind just dismissed them as poor proofreading before publishing. I'm still impressed by how far online translation services have come from the early days of AltaVista Babelfish.

      • by Rei (128717) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:38PM (#29876125) Homepage

        As an example, here's what *today's* Babelfish thinks of the article:

        To be fed up: ' 2012' is just over two centuries
        By: At Keulemans

        In the film 2012 that this month in premiere, fall the cities and continents go at small woods, if the world fares. Toch moan that research has shown exactly that it ' end of the tijden' of 21 December 2012 there probably clears two centuries beside zit.

  • by denzacar (181829) on Monday October 26, 2009 @02:59PM (#29875617) Journal

    Boom tomorrow. There's always a boom tomorrow.

  • Actually... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Kirin Fenrir (1001780) on Monday October 26, 2009 @02:59PM (#29875625)
    That's just what they want you to think.
  • by Gorm the DBA (581373) on Monday October 26, 2009 @02:59PM (#29875627) Journal
    Now we're going to have to deal with a rehash of all of that "You shouldn't call it the Millennium Bug, the new Millennium doesn't start until 1/1/2001, morons" BS...
  • 2220? (Score:5, Funny)

    by oldspewey (1303305) on Monday October 26, 2009 @02:59PM (#29875633)
    Does this mean we have to endure another round of shitty movies in 2217?
  • by NoYob (1630681) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:03PM (#29875677)
    Just to pass this on (I'm married so I'm already doomed):

    On 2012-12-21, many geeks were about to have sex from the new agey women who believed that it was the last day of the Earth.

  • by Itninja (937614) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:05PM (#29875701) Homepage
    So now this song will go like this?:

    Now I'm [still] waiting for the big boom
    And it know where I'm [was] gonna be
    The big boom
    I'm always getting closer to
    The big boom
    And it will catch up to me
    The big boom
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:05PM (#29875729)

    Every 25.8 years? That doesn't seem so spectacular. All we have to do is add 25.8 to the last doomsday and we'll know for certain. Did the last doomsday happen in 1994 or 1986? I don't remember either being particularly bad, except maybe for the music.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by richdun (672214)
      Probably an error in your European to American numerical translator - that should have been 25,800 years.
  • Didn't RTFA (Score:4, Insightful)

    by EkriirkE (1075937) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:06PM (#29875733) Homepage
    Have the past, current and this calculation all taken into account all the calendar changes made throughout history?
  • Amateurs (Score:5, Insightful)

    by whisper_jeff (680366) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:07PM (#29875743)
    The Mayans were amateurs when it comes to doomsday calendars. We have a doomsday once every 365 days (except on leap years) when our calendar hits December 31.

    Oh. Wait. It's not doomsday? It's just the end of the calendar cycle? Oh. Maybe the Mayan calendar's ending is the same thing and not the end of the world...

    Yeah.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Snowgen (586732)

      We have a doomsday once every 365 days (except on leap years) when our calendar hits December 31.

      I'm just being pedantic, I know, but our calendar (the Gregorian calendar) actually has a cycle of 400 years. The most recent cycle transition was in year 2000 (which was a leap year when it otherwise wouldn't have been).

      Of course the rest of your comment is spot-on!

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by ozbird (127571)

        The most recent cycle transition was in year 2000 (which was a leap year when it otherwise wouldn't have been).

        Just to be extra pedantic, the year 2000 was always going to be a leap year in the Gregorian calendar.

    • Re:Amateurs (Score:4, Interesting)

      by carp3_noct3m (1185697) <slashdot@warriors-shade . n et> on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:27PM (#29876791)

      I, being the information junkie I am, have read fairly extensively into this whole thing and have found some interesting information. The key thing is that all the really crazies seem to latch on to things like this and give it a bad name. The Mayans did not predict the end of the world, only the end of an age. In their thinking, there are basically cosmic seasons in the form of every 25k years. Also in their viewpoint, all previous transitions of ages were relatively catastrophic, but by no means end of the world. On top of all this, there happen to be a lot of coincidences scientifically with the date. The primary ones I have seen are the alignment of the planets on the galactic plane, and the best theory I read was that the potential for magnetic changes on the sun could make it a flurry of activity or the opposite. Im no scientist, but I gleaned past the hype and saw some good facts that at the least are interesting. Regardless, its not the end of the world, but it is also not the completely ridiculous y2k idea either (y2k = no scientific basis).

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Eil (82413)

      Penn and Teller did an entire Bullshit episode on this. Basically, the conclusion was: The Mayans themselves never predicted any doomsday. At all. They couldn't even predict the annihilation of their own civilization, let alone the human race. Their descendants don't know anything about a supposed doomsday. The whole was something invented by some crackpot authors to sell books to and get attention from gullible people. Just like every other doomsday prophesy in history.

  • Wrong diagnosis (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ShiningSomething (1097589) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:08PM (#29875749)

    major problems with the way the Maya Calendar is being read by doomsday prophets

    When someone reads the Mayan Calendar and predicts the end of times... I don't think the date is the most important detail they got wrong.

    • Re:Wrong diagnosis (Score:4, Interesting)

      by rainmaestro (996549) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:22PM (#29875921)

      Precisely. Hell, the *Mayans* didn't envision any doomsday scenarios. We don't even know for certain if the long count calendar cycles at 13 or 20 k'atuns (Mayan counting was base-20, though many scholars believe the calendar cycles after 13). Assuming 13, in Mayan culture the end of a cycle would be a major event, a time of celebration. Nothing in the archaeological record suggests they thought this world would end precisely 1 cycle after it began.

      All this nonsense is just another way to scam the gullible. These doomsday criers are worse than the Y2K nuts. At least Y2K had a grain of truth to it (the rollover *could* have caused problems if it hadn't been patched in time).

  • by captaindomon (870655) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:10PM (#29875769)
    Wait a minute, how do you "debunk" a myth or religious belief? The only way to "debunk" it is to wait until Dec 13th and then say, "See, the world didn't end afterall." Even that approach can run into problems with myths and religious beliefs "No, it DID happen, but it was a SPIRITUAL end to the world" etc. etc. This approach is the same as a religious leader "Proving" a scientific theorem based on revelation. These are different structures for argument, folks, and they can't be interchanged that way.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by brian0918 (638904)

      Wait a minute, how do you "debunk" a myth or religious belief? The only way to "debunk" it is to wait until Dec 13th and then say, "See, the world didn't end afterall."

      Actually, even if the world does end on the predicted date, the prophesies are still not true. There's no basis for their claims, so they're arbitrary.

    • by jbezorg (1263978) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:29PM (#29876007)

      In short, you can't reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into.

      ... that approach can run into problems with myths and religious beliefs "No, it DID happen, but it was a SPIRITUAL end to the world" ...

      That's when you make the sign of the Devil and tell them: "Glad to see you're still here. I'd like to be the first to officially welcome you to the team. I always enjoyed your work."

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Hurricane78 (562437)

      and then say, "See, the world didn't end afterall."

      You have no idea how that really works, do you? ^^
      I know how it works, because I was there. In the 80s. On a end-of-the world camp. With my mother.
      We sat in a tent, had a bonfire with kumbaja-singing, bongo drumming, ate out of a tajine... and when it was time, and nothing happened... ...people simply decided that they must have been wrong in their calculations, decided for a new future date, and continued what they always did.

      Schizophrenia (even the mild one, called superstition or religion) can't be heale

  • by FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:12PM (#29875797) Homepage
    The Mayans actually had dates carved into stylae which took place long, long after 2012. For example:

    For example, on the west panel at the Temple of Inscriptions in Palenque, a section of the text projects into the future to the 80th Calendar Round (CR) 'anniversary' of the famous Palenque ruler K'inich Janaab' Pakal's accession to the throne (Pakal's accession occurred on a Calendar Round date 5 Lamat 1 Mol, at Long Count 9.9.2.4.8 equivalent to 27 July 615 CE).[12] It does this by commencing with Pakal's birthdate 9.8.9.13.0 8 Ajaw 13 Pop (24 March 603 CE) and adding to it the Distance Number 10.11.10.5.8.[13] This calculation arrives at the 80th Calendar Round since his accession, a day that also has a CR date of 5 Lamat 1 Mol, but which lies over 4,000 years in the future from Pakal's time--the day 21 October in the year 4772. The inscription notes that this day would fall eight days after the completion of the 1st piktun [since the creation or zero date of the Long Count system], where the piktun is the next-highest order above the b'ak'tun in the Long Count. If the completion date of that piktun--13 October 4772--were to be written out in Long Count notation, it could be represented as 1.0.0.0.0.0. The 80th CR anniversary date, eight days later, would be 1.0.0.0.0.8 5 Lamat 1 Mol.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesoamerican_Long_Count_calendar#2012_and_the_Long_Count [wikipedia.org]

  • by Zarf_is_with_you (1382411) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:15PM (#29875843) Journal

    My credit card will be paid off by then making Minimum payments.
  • by gmuslera (3436) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:31PM (#29876023) Homepage Journal
    Not only you have to "predict" the end on the world (based on trusty facts like ancient calendars, weird math tricks, how mush grows, holy books, tea leaves and hand lines), but have to pick something flexible enough to show after the predicted time how you made a small mistake and will happen somewhat shortly after anyway (so, i.e. you dont have to return what has been "donated" to your church or something similar because all was ending). Is not the 1st time that the end of the world has been delayed. In Y2K some tough that was after Dec 31/99, but some of the scare survived till Dec 31/00. Jehovah’s Witnesses predicted that all will end in 1874, then 1878, 1881, 1910, 1914, 1918, 1925, 1975, and 1984.

    There are several lists of those Doomsday predictions, i.e. here [wordpress.com]

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Xtifr (1323)

      My favorite example of a prediction retroactively corrected (albeit more tongue-in-cheek than most) is the Subgenii [subgenius.com], who, when the world didn't end in 1998, decided that they'd gotten the date upside down! The correct date, they now proclaim [sourceforge.net], is 8661. :)

      (Actually, they apparently now have end-of-world celebrations every year, just in case, but I remember when the 8661 date was on the front page of the Subgenius website, and that date is still commemorated in the ddate man page as above, and is mentioned in

  • by Xoc-S (645831) on Monday October 26, 2009 @03:38PM (#29876133)
    The most commonly used correlation of the Gregorian Calendar and the Maya Calendar is the GMT correlation, after Goodwin, Martinez, Thompson, the main proponents. In this correlation, December 21, 2012 will be the end of the 13th Baktun. The only other correlation used by any but fringe scholars places the end of the 13th Baktun two days later on December 23rd. These guys are proposing a new correlation because of some reading of the Venus pages in the Dresden Codex. However. as has been known since at least the 1950s the Venus pages work exactly right with the GMT correlation, so these guys are just wrong about their correlation.

    The reason for all the hoopla about 2012, is that in the Maya Calendar, the last creation ended on a 13th Baktun. The lunatics suppose that since the last creation ended on a 13th Baktun, the Maya supposed that this creation would also end after 13 Baktuns, but there is no evidence that the Maya had any such beliefs. There is a date on the West Panel of the Temple of Inscriptions from Palenque that refers to an anniversary of the crowning of the king, Pacal, that makes it quite obvious that the Maya believed that there was a 14th through 20th Baktun.

    So, in summary, these guys are wrong about the new correlation, and all the 2012 nutjobs are wrong about even the Maya believing that 2012 was the end of this creation. For more information, see the presentation on the FAMSI (Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies) web site by Mark Van Stone that fully details what is known and what is true about Maya beliefs about 2012. http://www.famsi.org/research/vanstone/2012/index.html [famsi.org]

  • by spaceyhackerlady (462530) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:40PM (#29877011)

    The only science here is bullshit.

    They can't even get basic facts right. The so-called "alignment" is 6 degrees off, and happens twice a year.

    The last rollover of a b'akt'un cycle was in 1618. Did anybody notice?

    ...laura

  • by SwashbucklingCowboy (727629) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:52PM (#29877193)

    Now we're going to have to listen to this nonsense for another 12 years.

  • Whatever... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by hackus (159037) on Monday October 26, 2009 @04:55PM (#29877231) Homepage

    As I see it, whenever a calendar marks the changing of an age and in particular the Mayan calendar which, make no mistake these stone agers knew their mathematics, I take pause.

    Secondly, I find it odd, all of a sudden now, after what 200 years of studying this calendar someone with "never before seen insight into Mayan calendar mathematics and observational astronomy" says "Woops, everyone goofed its actually XXXX."

    That is sort of like myself declaring, well...all of you guys thought Octover 27th was tomorrow, but I am smarter than you all, and everyone in the last 200 years that looked at the problem, and I say its 200 years from now.

    The mathematics has been beaten like a dead horse, and indeed the age ends on December 21st on the solstice marker.

    Now, I am not so sure anything dire is going to happen, but I do believe at the end of any age, its closing represents a judgement on the future path time will proceed.

    Be it good or bad, I hope humanity gets exactly what it deserves.

    -Hack

  • obligatory (Score:3, Interesting)

    by TRRosen (720617) on Monday October 26, 2009 @07:01PM (#29878755)

    Tonight were gonna party like its 2219?

We are Microsoft. Unix is irrelevant. Openness is futile. Prepare to be assimilated.

Working...