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Communication Lost With Indian Moon Satellite

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  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @04:49PM (#29246355)

    ... Are they sure that was a moon?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      scratches head I'm trying to figure out how the first comment to the story could be "redundant". Hey, moderator who did that: You're a moron. Also, you will never have enough mod points to defeat me. nyaaaah. -_- Okay... my childish needs are satisfied for the afternoon.

      • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        It means "we've heard that joke too much & are sick of it." Your code word for this is obligatory, but since there's no "-1 Obligatory" the moderator used "-1 Redundant" which is actually a pretty common usage.

        • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

          It means "we've heard that joke too much & are sick of it." Your code word for this is obligatory, but since there's no "-1 Obligatory" the moderator used "-1 Redundant" which is actually a pretty common usage.

          *shrug* I hear star wars references at work at least once a day. I didn't think it was possible for them to get sick of it. I'm going with the notion that the moderator in question shorted himself on caffeine and hates life.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            I hear star wars references at work at least once a day.

            Be that as it may, many are turning against non sequitur pop culture quotations as humor; xkcd 307 [xkcd.com] is a particularly relevant example.

            • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

              by retchdog (1319261)

              I love XKCD, but Randall Munroe should perhaps remove the beam from his own eye ...

              • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

                by Anonymous Coward

                That would explain why he can't draw for shit.

            • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

              Be that as it may, many are turning against non sequitur pop culture quotations as humor; xkcd 307 is a particularly relevant example.

              They're doing it because they don't like being left out when average people quote movies and television series they haven't seen. I learned a long time ago that appearing to be smart and intellectual all the time comes at a cost to my social life -- it's better to keep my education and intelligence "in my pocket" as it were. If that means knowing a few facts about the current mix of reality TV shows, and picking up a celebrity gossip magazine here and there, so be it. It just means that I have plans friday

              • by Rip Dick (1207150)
                Soooo what are you doing next Friday?
              • by SL Baur (19540)

                It just means that I have plans friday night while my geek friends sit at home grinding on World of Warcraft.

                My plans for next Friday are to run heroics with my wife to help get her new level 80 geared up. Best of both worlds, I suppose.

        • by KillerBob (217953)

          It means "we've heard that joke too much & are sick of it." Your code word for this is obligatory, but since there's no "-1 Obligatory" the moderator used "-1 Redundant" which is actually a pretty common usage.

          In Soviet Russia, Joke has heard YOU too much!

          (sorry, I couldn't resist...)

  • Clearly... (Score:5, Funny)

    by SteveFoerster (136027) <steve AT hiresteve DOT com> on Saturday August 29, 2009 @04:52PM (#29246381) Homepage

    They must have asked it something that wasn't on the script!

    • I thought it but you had the guts to say it.
    • by russlar (1122455) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:16PM (#29246603)
      That's no call centre, that's the Moon!
    • Japan (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I barely remember as a kid, folks used to make fun of Japanese made stuff.

      Then the 80s came.

      If your kids don't have any genius level talent - and I'm mean they leave their peers in the dust without any assistance from you - encourage them to go to law school and become some sort of elected official. In the near future, if you're not some sort of Government VIP, you'll be little people. Joseph P. Kennedy was so far ahead of his time for pushing his kids into politics. Why else would a multimillionaire (mad

      • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

        by Dreadneck (982170)

        Joseph P. Kennedy was so far ahead of his time for pushing his kids into politics.

        Joe Kennedy was not ahead of his time. What he did has been done repeatedly down through the ages - first aquire wealth then establish your line firmly within the ruling/governing class.

      • Re:Japan (Score:5, Insightful)

        by SL Baur (19540) <steve@xemacs.org> on Saturday August 29, 2009 @11:33PM (#29248893) Homepage Journal

        I barely remember as a kid, folks used to make fun of Japanese made stuff.

        Yeah, and after mastering the art of kaizen (and retooling after the war), nobody was laughing at "Made in Japan" any more.

        India has refused to cripple themselves with c(r)ap and trade.

        I know of at least two folks I mentored at work in the mid 1980s who are now university professors. I'm following my job to India, and I'll take up the role I've always taken up and be tutoring as many people as I can. I already have a "conspiracy" set up with a (very) bright programmer in Bangalore to tutor as many coworkers as we can.

        India will not always be considered backwards and disrespected. I think that's a good thing. Competition Is Good.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by cbiltcliffe (186293)

      I dunno. Maybe they just need to call tech support....

    • They shot it down, and the thing in is pieces on moon-land. India didn't secure the proper intergalactical alien green card space visitor visa passport stamps before their visit. They thought they could just show up and drive around the moon a bit.
    • by elrous0 (869638) *
      At least the press conference announcing the bad news featured a really cool dance number.
  • rfc1149 (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 29, 2009 @04:56PM (#29246417)

    shortly before contact was lost the system was upgraded to be rfc1149 compliant

    • Hmm, they must have missed the part about 'low altitude'...
      • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        I think someone must have been weezing the juice...
  • Hopefully... (Score:2, Informative)

    by Sawopox (18730)

    They will at least find out what happened. The more efficient space agencies we have exploring, the better overall for the planet.

    Makes the game more fun.

    • Re:Hopefully... (Score:5, Informative)

      by vu2lid (126111) on Sunday August 30, 2009 @08:10AM (#29250683) Homepage

      I am quoting from a local language news paper ( http://www.keralakaumudi.com/ [keralakaumudi.com] ) from India:

      Preliminary analysis shows that Chandrayan likely failed due to inadequate heat shielding (problem was radiated heat from the Moon) causing some of the instruments to fail (like Star Sensor). They raised the orbit to around 200km (from the initial 100km) to save the mission and it did not help much.

      According to the report Chandrayan was successful in completing 95 percent of the mission objectives. The reports also said that they (ISRO) are going ahead with the next moon mission.

      • Uuum... if it did not survive the "heat" of the Moon, how did it survive the real heat of earth (athmosphere) and launch then...?

        Smells fishy to me.

  • by moon3 (1530265) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:03PM (#29246477)
    Hey India, maned mission next time around, show us some drama.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      "Maned" mission, eh? Are they sending lions into space to orbit the moon now?
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      MIssion control has quickly invested the rest of their budget in a Bollywood-made lunar landing.

    • Hey India, maned mission next time around, show us some drama.

      You want them to send horses? o.O

  • have a base on the dark side. Obviously they are to blame.

  • Go India! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by goodmanj (234846) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:17PM (#29246615)

    Before this thread fills up completely with cynical wisecracking Americans, let me be the first to say, as a cynical wisecracking American, go India!

    Seriously. You guys have a very solid set of rockets, a good broad focus (China's too focused on manned missions), and the technical skills to make it happen.

    See you at Jupiter someday!

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:24PM (#29246673)

      But do not attempt landing on Europa.

    • Re:Go India! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by quarterbuck (1268694) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:24PM (#29246675)
      The whole mission cost only $75 million, about 7 times the Ansari X-Prize (still considerably bigger than Google Lunar X-Prize though). That's pretty cheap for a full moonshot and satellite. So I guess India can afford to lose a few satellites here and there.
      Last month they had a malfunction and pulled the satellite up from a 100km orbit to a 200 km one , so the images are of lower quality than planned. I am guessing there will be another moonshot now, considering they just started calling this the "Chandrayan-1" instead of "Chandrayan" with no numbers next to it.
      • Sigh (Score:5, Informative)

        by WindBourne (631190) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @09:58PM (#29248425) Journal
        I wish that ppl would stop trying to assign DOLLAR figures to China, Indian, or any other country that ties their money to a certain money. Saying that it cost 75 million is plain wrong (most estimates in India show it to be in the $90-95 million). Right now, the Rupee is FORCED by India to trade at 48 rupee to a dollar. According to most economist, it should be around half of that, or possibly less (more difficult to pin this down, than say the Chinese games with Yuans). As such, the missions is around $150-200 million. But, that is STILL not the full truth. The majority of expensive instruments on the sat are from different countries. Basically, the LAUNCH is what costs about $100-150 million, with the sat being less than $50 million. And at a 100 million per launch, they are on par with America, Russia, and EU.

        I am not trying to belittle their efforts. In fact, far from it. I applaud them and hope that we will bring them into the ISS down the road. BUT, I still prefer that ppl are honest about what is going on.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by dangle (1381879)

      There's an interesting (for many reasons) video on the Chandrayaan site:

      http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/resources_videoCrater.htm [isro.org]

      In it, they allude to India as having the second highest number of scientists in the world.

      Overall, a successful mission, given the difficulty and chance of failure (Item 20 in their FAQ):

      http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/faqs.htm [isro.org]

    • Re:Go India! (Score:5, Informative)

      by FleaPlus (6935) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @07:03PM (#29247429) Journal

      Before this thread fills up completely with cynical wisecracking Americans, let me be the first to say, as a cynical wisecracking American, go India!

      Seriously. You guys have a very solid set of rockets, a good broad focus (China's too focused on manned missions), and the technical skills to make it happen.

      Also, I found it a little strange that the BBC article didn't mention this, but the Chandrayaan-1 had already been in successful operation for 312 days and had completed all of its primary mission goals. It had already collected plenty of scientific data, distributed to not just Indian scientists but also collaborators in Europe and the US. Of course, another year would be nice, but I'd consider the project a stunning success by just about any reasonable definition, especially since it was India's first ever lunar probe.

      I look forward to India's Chandrayaan-2, which is planned to land a robotic rover on the Moon in 2012.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan-1#Completion_of_primary_objectives [wikipedia.org]

    • Well said sir. Not many countries have operated a satellite around the moon and achieved their primary objectives in nearly a year of successful operation. The more countries (and private concerns) that do so the better, we need more countries with space ambitions. It's very likely only one country will have the capability to launch people into space in the near future, it's easy to fear a time when we cease to have meaningful explorations into space at all.

      A bit of a shame that the majority of slashdot pos

  • by prisoner-of-enigma (535770) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:18PM (#29246625) Homepage

    OPERATOR: Hello, my name is Prakesh Vijay Chandrashekar Subrayaman, but please call me "Bob." What seems to be the problem today?

    MISSION CONTROL: We've lost communications with our lunar satellite.

    "BOB": I see. Well, have you tried rebooting the system?

    MC: There is no system to reboot. It's a satellite, not a PC!

    "BOB": I see. Well, have you checked to see if the power cord is plugged into the device?

    MC: Are you not listening? There is no power cord, it's a *satellite*.

    "BOB": I see. Well, sir, I'll need you to find the original CD-ROM that came with the satellite and put it into the CD-ROM drive, the turn the power off, then turn it back on again.

    MC: OK, this is getting ridiculous, "Bob". I thought this was the satellite technical support line. Do you know anything about *satellites*?

    "BOB": I see. Well, let me see what I can do. Can I place you on hold for four or five hours?

    MC: -- click --

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You left out the part where they say in indianglish
      "BOB": We're very sorry that you are experiencing this problem. This problem is by our hand and we will take care of it. Once again, we are very sorry, now can you please begin by giving me your first name?
      MC: Mission
      "BOB": OK "Mission", can you now give me your last name?
      MC: Control
      "BOB": OK Mr. "Control", do you mind if I call you "Mission"?
      MC: Uhm, OK.
      "BOB": OK, "Mission" can you look for me on the side of your satellite and read me the service tag on th

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by CheeseTroll (696413)

      It's Mission Control's fault, for calling the Toshiba Satellite tech support number.

    • That's when NASA calls satellite tech support. When the Indian space program calls satellite tech support, they get a guy speaking barely comprehensible Urdu with a heavy American accent.
  • Of course you know what this means. Alien invasion. And not the good kind like they have on the playboy channel late at night.

    I for one welcome our new satellite crushing overlords.
  • by Locutus (9039) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:19PM (#29246631)
    Could it be that the last few seconds of data shows no sign of altitude loss and rapid deceleration?
    Maybe it ran into a rather large, mostly colorless, and smooth monolith.

    LoB
  • manufacturer? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I got the impression the satellite was less Indian than International (or at least there were American payload on board), so the datalink equipment may not be of Indian in origin (too many cooks spoiled the broth; see also Boeing 787).

    • No, the expensive instruments were other countries. The backbone was India's (power system, comm link, etc). Now, as to losing communication with the sat, give it time. It is possible that it will be regained. It could be a simple issue, that will be solved.
  • reboot ? (Score:2, Funny)

    by georgeav (965554)
    Have they tried turning it off and on again?
  • by brusk (135896) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:33PM (#29246757)

    2009 was the year the Indian lunar satellite went out of control.

  • by Random Q. Hacker (137687) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @05:51PM (#29246871)

    If the needful had been done, this would not have happened.

  • by readin (838620)
    Wait, India has its own moon? and that moon has a satellite? And we now have eight planets instead of nine?

    I think the Indians stole something...
  • by Advocatus Diaboli (1627651) on Saturday August 29, 2009 @06:04PM (#29246971)
    A more detailed discussion - from the Indian viewpoint. http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=4395&start=1440 [bharat-rakshak.com]
  • by QuoteMstr (55051) <dan.colascione@gmail.com> on Saturday August 29, 2009 @06:42PM (#29247263)

    Orbiting the moon is a lot harder than orbiting the earth. The moon's gravitational field is exceptionally lumpy [wikipedia.org] because of concentrations of mass beneath the surface. If not actively corrected for, these mass concentrations will make a satellite's orbit go through increasingly violent gyrations until it eventually intersects with the surface.

    I wonder if this is what happened to the Indian probe.

    • by I.M.O.G. (811163)

      If not actively corrected for, these mass concentrations will make a satellite's orbit go through increasingly violent gyrations until it eventually intersects with the surface.

      While that sounds pretty good, I'm fairly certain from a logical standpoint the odds of impacting the moon are as good or worse than the odds of leaving orbit and flying out into space. (Especially with the low gravity levels of the moon.)

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        While that sounds pretty good, I'm fairly certain from a logical standpoint the odds of impacting the moon are as good or worse than the odds of leaving orbit and flying out into space. (Especially with the low gravity levels of the moon.)

        I'm less than certain. Intersecting with the Moon would only require changes in ellipticity, whereas causing the satellite to become unbound would require a considerable increase in the satellite's kinetic energy.

      • by Buelldozer (713671) <cliff AT gindulis DOT net> on Saturday August 29, 2009 @08:56PM (#29248105)

        No.

        The lumps of heavier density inside the moon caused localized areas of increased gravity which tries to pull the satellite down. There is no force, except that provided by any motors on board the satellite, that would sent it out towards space.

        What school of logic do you claim as an Alma Mata?

        • by I.M.O.G. (811163)

          What you said actually makes sense upon further thought. I wouldn't call myself certain in either line of thought currently.

          My original thought was that after going through an area of increased gravitational pull, then hitting an area of lower gravitational pull, the satellite's trajectory would be altered in such a way over time that it could break free from the gravitational effect of the moon if it hits a lower gravitational field at a necessary point within its altered orbital path.

          Now what I'm curious

    • No. They had an earlier malfunction which was corrected by pulling the satellite up from a lower orbit. They were flying fine at 100 Km altitude earlier, and they moved it up to 200 km [isro.org] to be safe. They were actively studying gravitational perturbations of the surface, so it is unlikely that they did not plan for such an eventuality.
      The Official press release [isro.org] seems to indicate that it was a communications failure this time. The contact was lost abruptly this time. If it was falling I would assume that
  • In other news... (Score:2, Flamebait)

    by bmo (77928)

    A radio signal was detected from the Moon and appears to be aimed at Io.

    --
    BMO

  • Can't they just call the Satellite Call Support center?
  • Wtf BBC? Seriously? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by baboonlogic (989195) <anshul@ba b o o nlogic.com> on Sunday August 30, 2009 @12:09AM (#29249061) Homepage

    Some critics regard the space programme as a waste of resources in a country where millions still lack basic services.

    Seriously BBC... wtf is up with that? India is a trillion dollar economy and this was 75 million usd project. Can I say chump change? For some context, India recently announced a really stupid 30 billion usd national id scheme [wikipedia.org]. While reporting that, you [bbc.co.uk] did not care to mention India's millions that lack basic services. Why do you hate India and real scientific progress so much?

    • by jchandra (15040) on Sunday August 30, 2009 @12:52AM (#29249241) Homepage

      Some critics regard BBC as a waste of resources in a country where millions lack basic services.

      India may be lying in the gutter, but at least they are looking up, and working hard on getting out.

    • by gbjbaanb (229885)

      Some critics regard the space programme as a waste of resources in a country where millions still lack basic services.

      well, I've been to rural Alabama. Which country was the critics talking about again?

  • Congrats India! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by herojig (1625143)

    What an achievement for a country where you can't use your credit card in most places, and where Banks don't even have reliable phone service. Reminds of the time I enfielded from Delhi to Gaya and in the middle of a tea stop a white-robed local came up to me shouting angrily in Hindi and broken English, "India is Great! India is Great!" I responded by buying him a cup, and that seemed to calm him down after I halfheartedly agreed with him, but now I wish now I had the stats on Chandrayaan-1 and perhaps so

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