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Deathbed Confession Says Aliens Were at Roswell 1267

Posted by Zonk
from the here-comes-the-super-copter-here-comes-the-noise-it-makes dept.
xnuandax writes "The army's explanation of weather balloons in the Roswell, New Mexico incident 60 years ago has been dealt a serious public relations blow. Late Army Lt. Walter Haut had signed a sealed affidavit prior to his death last year asserting that he had witnessed the wreckage of an egg-shaped craft and its extraterrestrial crew while working at the Roswell Army Air Field. An article at News.com.au reviews how Haut had worked as public relations officer for the Roswell base and was involved in the original weather balloon explanation of events at the time. This recent evidence would seem to confirm speculation that egg-shaped saucers are notoriously difficult to fly safely at low altitude."
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Deathbed Confession Says Aliens Were at Roswell

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  • Bombula (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Bombula (670389) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:03PM (#19711529)
    As much as I want to believe aliens are among us, it just doesn't make sense that a civilization advanced enough to cross interstellar space would crash in New Mexico. And the chances of aliens being humanoid in appearance are close to zero.
    • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Tablizer (95088) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:09PM (#19711605) Homepage Journal
      As much as I want to believe aliens are among us, it just doesn't make sense that a civilization advanced enough to cross interstellar space would crash in New Mexico. And the chances of aliens being humanoid in appearance are close to zero.

      First off, it may be that the visitors have a limited budget, just like anything we do does. One allocates the risk based on this budget. Even though we may have the money to make or buy the Ultimate Safest Volvo, it does not mean we will.

      As far as appearence, here are some possibilities:

      1. They are interested in us *because* we look like them.

      2. They are us from the future.

      3. We are a degerate form of them.

      4. The human-like form is somewhat universal after all.
      • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Insightful)

        by brian0918 (638904) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [8190nairb]> on Sunday July 01, 2007 @11:13PM (#19712655)
        "4. The human-like form is somewhat universal after all."

        It's only universal among the uncreative minds of most scifi authors. Even on earth the diversity is so great that you wouldn't consider birds/insects/slugs to be "human-like forms" but even they have most of the parts (eye, head, nose, ears) in approximately the same relative locations. The chances of this occurring on another planet seem remote.
        • Re:Bombula (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Amiga Trombone (592952) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @11:46PM (#19712945)
          It's only universal among the uncreative minds of most scifi authors. Even on earth the diversity is so great that you wouldn't consider birds/insects/slugs to be "human-like forms" but even they have most of the parts (eye, head, nose, ears) in approximately the same relative locations. The chances of this occurring on another planet seem remote.

          Yes, but then again consider sharks and dolphins. Very similar in appearance, even though one is a mammal and one is a fish. Frequently they're mistaken for one another even thought they aren't remotely related.
          • Re:Bombula (Score:4, Informative)

            by SEE (7681) on Monday July 02, 2007 @05:45AM (#19715051) Homepage
            Not remotely related? They're both descended from the jawed fish that was the prototype for infraphylum Gnathostomata in subphylum Vertebra in phylum Chordata, an ancestor that provided both with the same basic structure (skull, jaw, spinal column, pairs of limbs) and over 80% common DNA.
        • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Interesting)

          by lawpoop (604919) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @11:51PM (#19712973) Homepage Journal
          But you also have convergent evolution. Thus, the eye has arisen independently some 22 times in the tree of life, IIRC. You mention the head, which has been a reproductively successful adaptation. What I'm saying is not that the first successful body-plan that happen to evolve was the head and thorax, so that's what all descendants got. What I'm saying is that the environment selects body-plans that are beneficial, which is why we observe example of convergent evolution, such as legs and wings in chordates and insects.

          As an example, we have radially symmetrical animals, such as jellyfish, and bilaterally symmetrical animals, such as chordates. Stephen Pinker talks about how any animal navigating an environment with gravity would benefit from a bilaterally symmetrical body plan. Thus we might reasonably conclude that any life form on a planet that can randomly evolve a bilaterally symmetrical body would have reproductive success. Once you have bilaterally symmetry, I don't think it's too much of a leap to think they could evolve legs, useful on land and water, and heads with brains. Once you have legs, then you can evolve manipulative appendages, such as hands. If you have two legs, you might not do too much manipulation with them, because you benefit more from them being evolved more for walking than manipulation. But if you have an extra pair of legs ( if the animal is bilaterally symmetric, it probably wouldn't have 3 or 5 ), then you might start using the extra pair to manipulate objects all the time, instead of walking on them. Then the lineage would experience selection for better and better tool manipulation with its extra legs -- so they become 'hands'. Once you're walking on one pair of legs, and manipulating objects with the other, bingo! -- you've got a humanoid.

          So once you can accept that a body plan of a torso, which has all your organs for digesting food and eliminating waster, and a head, for sensing the environment and thinking about it, is a body-plan that was successful and therefore selected, rather than just a random body plan that was just passed on, it's not to much of a leap to say that one of those walking animals stood up and used two of those legs to manipulate objects instead of walk. And if convergent evolution can happen among independent lineages here on earth, why not in similar environments, like a rocky planet, somewhere else in space? Is it too much of a stretch to imagine wings or eyes evolving in extra-terrestrial animals? How about then legs or arms and hands?

          To describe a 'humanoid', all you need is an upright torso with a head, two legs for locomotion, and two manipulative hands. I don't think it's too far of a stretch to say that such a body plan for an intelligent, conscious, tool-making creature would be selected in a convergent evolution scenario.

          Then the question is, animals of what body-plan would be developing vehicles that can travel interstallar space? Elephants and dolphins might be as smart as we are, but without appendages to manipulate objects, they can't really build tools, buildings, or vehicles. Once you have manipulative appendages, then evolution might select animals who can better manipulate objects and their environment. That means they get smarter. Learning and technology develop. Then you get tools, buildings, and vehicles. So, there may be a lot of different intelligent animals with weird body plans, such as a radially-symmetrical jelly-fish like creature. But without the manipulative structures, such as hands, we wouldn't expect them to be building space ships, and winding up landing or crash-landing on other planets.
          • Re:Bombula (Score:4, Funny)

            by brit74 (831798) on Monday July 02, 2007 @01:13AM (#19713489)
            Well, gee, you use a lot of fancy words and "logic", but how do you explain Kang and Kodos [wikipedia.org], Mr. Smartypants? pwned!
          • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Funny)

            by E++99 (880734) on Monday July 02, 2007 @02:20AM (#19713953) Homepage

            So, there may be a lot of different intelligent animals with weird body plans, such as a radially-symmetrical jelly-fish like creature. But without the manipulative structures, such as hands, we wouldn't expect them to be building space ships, and winding up landing or crash-landing on other planets.


            Or maybe that's why the crashed.
            "Turn the egg! Turn the egg!"
            "I can't, I don't have any hands!!!"
            "AHHHHHHHHH!!!!"
          • Re:Bombula (Score:4, Insightful)

            by misleb (129952) on Monday July 02, 2007 @02:58AM (#19714191)

            As an example, we have radially symmetrical animals, such as jellyfish, and bilaterally symmetrical animals, such as chordates. Stephen Pinker talks about how any animal navigating an environment with gravity would benefit from a bilaterally symmetrical body plan. Thus we might reasonably conclude that any life form on a planet that can randomly evolve a bilaterally symmetrical body would have reproductive success. Once you have bilaterally symmetry


            I had read that symmetry is not so much a matter of random luck... but a matter of information efficiency. That is, it is much more efficient/quicker (and therefore more likely to happen) to just repeat existing patterns than to evolve a unique structures for each "side" of the organism.

            -matthew
          • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Genda (560240) <mariet@go[ ]et ['t.n' in gap]> on Monday July 02, 2007 @03:02AM (#19714209) Journal

            I'm sorry but this is just not a conversation that makes any sense. We haven't even got the vaguest idea of what the boundaries are for the conversation "What is Life?". The idea that a species evolving in a different environment, I mean really different, is going to in any way resemble human beings, is simply ludicrous. You gotta cut back on the Star Trek, the numerous humanoid aliens there are simply a function of make-up vs. CGI budget.

            We (human beings) are running around with DNA from an ancient ancestor that had 5 fold symmetry, 4 limbs + head, 5 fingers on each hand, five toes on each foot, and five primary orifices in the skull (think inverted appendage.) Before that we inherited DNA from a worm... if you look at a human body morphologically we're worms that evolved better means of locomotion, and the ability to manipulate our local environment. Any alien you see owning a head with a face you can recognize, a spine, and limbs would have had to evolve on this planet. There are trillions of evolutionary paths that could have made life on earth wildly different, and to assume the path that produced us is the only path that could have produced sentient life with the ability to manipulate it's environment is not only myopic, it's homocentric to a fault.

            I won't argue that certain structures would prove useful on earth and evolve repeatedly given our enviornment. Even on earh, however there are vastly different organism operating in wildly different circumstances, no light, crushing pressure and heat, sulphur as an energy cycle, even organisms that exist in ultracold and environments lacking oxygen. That's just on this planet, using precisely the same DNA, and carbon based biology.

            I could easily imagine life based on completely different chemistry... carbon will usually be the most likely chemical backbone, though at higher temperatures sillicon and metals might combine in very interesting ways. Sensing is a vital characteristic of life, but organs of sense might be tremendously different for another species. They might sense any or all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and do so with organs very different from ours. How and what they consume and excrete might be very different than what we understand... even on earth what animals breath out, plants breath in... what might setient beings who move as slowly as plants occur to us like? Plants have powerful sensory capabilities, but they are very unlike humanoids.

            On earth the octopus is a prime example of a mollusk well on it's way to becoming a technological intelligence. Here's an animal with much in common with human beings but also very alien... communication through melenophores... that's way ourside our normal thinking, and this is an intelligent terrestrial species. How much more different might a being be that evolved in a cold methane lake, or whose fundamental chemisty is composed of complex sugars instead of proteins.

            You're going to have to stretch your head a whole lot more if you're goin to imagine life elsewhere. The chances of it being a lot like us is slim at best. Anyway you're going to have to sift through a lot of microoganisms before you find any larger than unicellular life out there. Of course, there's nothing preventing unicellular communities from becoming sentient. That's a kind of life we should be very careful not to miss, simply because it doesn't look like us.

          • Re:Bombula (Score:4, Funny)

            by jollyreaper (513215) on Monday July 02, 2007 @07:10AM (#19715445)

            As an example, we have radially symmetrical animals, such as jellyfish, and bilaterally symmetrical animals, such as chordates. Stephen Pinker talks about how any animal navigating an environment with gravity would benefit from a bilaterally symmetrical body plan. Thus we might reasonably conclude that any life form on a planet that can randomly evolve a bilaterally symmetrical body would have reproductive success. Once you have bilaterally symmetry, I don't think it's too much of a leap to think they could evolve legs, useful on land and water, and heads with brains. Once you have legs, then you can evolve manipulative appendages, such as hands. If you have two legs, you might not do too much manipulation with them, because you benefit more from them being evolved more for walking than manipulation. But if you have an extra pair of legs ( if the animal is bilaterally symmetric, it probably wouldn't have 3 or 5 ), then you might start using the extra pair to manipulate objects all the time, instead of walking on them. Then the lineage would experience selection for better and better tool manipulation with its extra legs -- so they become 'hands'. Once you're walking on one pair of legs, and manipulating objects with the other, bingo! -- you've got a humanoid.

            So once you can accept that a body plan of a torso, which has all your organs for digesting food and eliminating waster, and a head, for sensing the environment and thinking about it, is a body-plan that was successful and therefore selected, rather than just a random body plan that was just passed on, it's not to much of a leap to say that one of those walking animals stood up and used two of those legs to manipulate objects instead of walk. And if convergent evolution can happen among independent lineages here on earth, why not in similar environments, like a rocky planet, somewhere else in space? Is it too much of a stretch to imagine wings or eyes evolving in extra-terrestrial animals? How about then legs or arms and hands?

            To describe a 'humanoid', all you need is an upright torso with a head, two legs for locomotion, and two manipulative hands. I don't think it's too far of a stretch to say that such a body plan for an intelligent, conscious, tool-making creature would be selected in a convergent evolution scenario.
            Yeah, but you left out the most important question: can Kirk bang their chicks?
      • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Insightful)

        by BlueStraggler (765543) on Monday July 02, 2007 @02:07AM (#19713875)

        2. They are us from the future.

        I'm thinking it's us from the past. Considering that Homo Sapiens Sapiens is at least 50,000 years old, and recorded history about 5,000, there's been plenty of time for us to develop a few spacefaring civilizations. If you allow for some alternate branches of the homonid family you have a lot more time than that. You'd expect them to swing past the old farm from time to time to see what, if anything, has changed.

        On the other hand, who's to say they're from space at all? Even if the stories are 100% true, there's not a shred of evidence to show that they're from space. We've never seen spacecraft, only aircraft. Is space alien really more plausible than some kind of technologically superior earthling who can live undetected (almost) on the same planet as us?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      What the hell are you talking about!

      Humans are a result of the natural evolutionary process on this planet. We are "humanoid" because it's an efficient shape to have. I think it's fairly likely that there *are* aliens with a humanoid shape (two legs, arms), given that there *are* planets, out there, similar to earth. Is it so difficult to imagine that given similar conditions, life on a different planets could converge towards similar solutions to the same problem of survival in nature?
    • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:27PM (#19711781)
      Not everyone who buys a car is smart enough to design one. Maybe they're just hick aliens crashing their society's equivalent of a mass-market SUV into some boring planet in the middle of nowhere.
    • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Funny)

      by Fozzyuw (950608) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:27PM (#19711789)

      As much as I want to believe aliens are among us, it just doesn't make sense that [they] would crash in New Mexico.

      No kidding. New Mexico is soooo, yesterday. Kansas is where anybody who's anybody crashes.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Walt Dismal (534799)
      Accounts at the time noted there had been a massive thunder and lightning storm. Maybe they took a really big lightning hit. My guess is that what went down was only a small kind of landing craft, not the big boy. Probably couldn't take a massive lightning strike.

      And given the huge number of people deployed to cover many acres looking to retrieve SMALL debris, no weather balloon or Russian nuke detector payload would have justified such effort. And several local people did find and see unusual materials, n

    • Re:Bombula (Score:5, Funny)

      by martin-boundary (547041) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:51PM (#19711989)
      Yeah, but think again: did you know that Dick Cheney just appeared one day in 1941 out of nowhere? The day before, nobody had heard of him, and then, poof! there he was. And ever since, he seems to appear for a while and disappear without a trace for long periods. Coincidence? I reserve judgement.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by rolfwind (528248)
      I don't really believe in Roswell or spend too much time thinking about it as it is a waste of time but:

      As much as I want to believe aliens are among us, it just doesn't make sense that a civilization advanced enough to cross interstellar space would crash in New Mexico.

      Shit happens. It didn't make sense that Italy would get bogged down in backwards Ethiopia in WW2, that the English would lose a few battles to Zulus with spears, or that with our technology we can't conquer Iraq. Weirder things have happen

    • by Eric Damron (553630) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @11:37PM (#19712873)
      "As much as I want to believe aliens are among us, it just doesn't make sense that a civilization advanced enough to cross interstellar space would crash in New Mexico."

      Maybe the contract went to the lowest bidder?
  • by wesley96 (934306) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:04PM (#19711541) Homepage
    the craft's name was 'Humpty Dumpty'?
  • Ah! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by McGiraf (196030) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:05PM (#19711547) Homepage
    He probably died laughing behind his teethes.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by hedgemage (934558)
      I would love to leave behind one last, great practical joke such as this.
    • Signing a fake affidavit is a serious offence!

      Seriously folk, why should we listen to people on their death bed or to voices from beyond the grave? Do we really think that when people have nothing to lose or are dead they somehow get enlightened and honest?

  • by jzarling (600712) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:05PM (#19711549)
    THEY WERE FROM ORK
  • Highly improbable (Score:5, Insightful)

    by i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:07PM (#19711577) Homepage Journal
    I want to believe.....

    That being said... the U.S. government is remarkably inept at keeping secrets much less orchestrating a cover up of this size.

    Same is true of most conspiracy theories.
  • by evildogeye (106313) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:09PM (#19711601) Homepage
    He was the founder of the International UFO Museum and Research Center in Roswell, NM. I think that makes it necessary to take his death bed statement with a grain of salt.
  • by Don'tTreadOnMe (686201) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:14PM (#19711647)
    You gotta admit, a deathbed confession deisgned to perpeutate a myth would be pretty funny. I'd be laughing all the way to the mortuary, if it were me...
  • by abes (82351) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:17PM (#19711681) Homepage
    This was posted on digg, and as someone pointed out, Haut also ran a UFO museum. So .. yeah .. no ulterior motives ..

    A simple google search gives one of many such links:

    http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tw/07-20-95/cover.htm [tucsonweekly.com]

    Not to say that's the only reason he did that .. who knows. It just a bit odd. Other military people have come forward, including a high ranking general (who released a book). The general claimed all our current technology came from UFOs. Such as the night-vision goggles. This is a fairly outrageous claim even for someone with a rudimentary understanding of electronics.

    It's not that I think aliens are impossible. I just am highly suspicious that they'd sneak about so much. Or that our government could keep anything a secret for so long. And crackpots coming out with books on UFOs does not count as the leaks.
  • by Guppy06 (410832) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:20PM (#19711717)
    Dying Man Has Perverse Sense of Humor
  • by DumbSwede (521261) <slashdotbin@hotmail.com> on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:32PM (#19711837) Journal
    "This recent evidence would seem to confirm speculation that egg-shaped saucers are notoriously difficult to fly safely at low altitude."

    I'm curious just where this speculation was forwarded. Is there some UFO magazine with articles like "Egg Shape Saucers -- How Easy to Fly" or "Egg shaped versus conventional Plate shaped, which Flying Saucer is right for your intergalactic traveling needs?" or better yet is Consumer Reports planning a Fly Saucer Safety issue? "Flying Saucer Roll Over Crash Test Results -- Egg Shaped Models perform poorly"
  • by rueger (210566) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @09:58PM (#19712057) Homepage
    There is no way they could keep a secret of this magnitude and cover it up for 60 years.

    Ok, let me get this reasoning straight.

    a) There's no way that the government could keep a secret that long.
    b) How do we know that there's no way that the government could keep a secret that long?
    c) Because if the government tried to keep a secret that long we would have beard about it.

    Just for the sake of argument, what if the government managed to... um ... keep a secret secret? Is it possible that we wouldn't have heard about it?

    (especially if they used secret alien technology to keep it secret!)
  • The whole problem, in my mind, with the Roswell "conspiracy", is the part that has a flight of P-51 Mustangs shooting down a spacecraft capable of travelling at intersteller speeds. As good as the P-51 was back in its day, it would be almost miraculous for one of these planes to shoot down a modern jet aircraft such as the F-22 or the EF-2000. Obviously, the technology required for manned interstellar space flight is easily 50 - 100 years beyond what we have now, and so, the claim seems utterly foolish. In any case, if an interstellar ship could reach the earth once, why wouldn't they have sent a rescue party looking for their fallen comrades?
    • by robogun (466062) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @10:57PM (#19712521)
      I believe the first F-117 Stealth (invisible to all high tech anti-air defenses) was brought down over Serbia by an AK-47. The Pentagon story is it was brought down with an SA-3 with a hacked radar, but either way a primitive tool brought it down.
      • by MosesJones (55544) on Monday July 02, 2007 @04:08AM (#19714623) Homepage
        I believe the first F-117 Stealth (invisible to all high tech anti-air defenses)

        The "Stealth" planes are one of the greatest examples of why there are no advanced Alien Technologies. The F-117 is very visibile to most modern high-tech anti-air defense radar, its just a smaller bleep than it should be which makes it slightly trickier. This makes it difficult for crap 20+ year old radars to see it, e.g. the ones that the French, US and Brits sold to Iraq. If the F-117 was actually invisible to radar then they wouldn't be flying it at 30,000ft all the time.

        If the US really does have alien technology and it led to the F-117 I'd really suggest complaining back to the "superior" race that invented it.

        Now Stealth Ships however tend to work because they build on the radar clutter that the sea causes thus making the ships nearly impossible to make out from the background noise.
  • by Adeptus_Luminati (634274) on Sunday July 01, 2007 @10:56PM (#19712515)
    Big deal 1 guy admits it, the video below shows 22 of 400 senior Government, NASA, Airfoce & other top Military personel admitting it on National/International television that aliens are real & Gov has been hiding it.

    The Disclosure Project:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vyVe-6YdUk [youtube.com]

    Yeah it's almost 2 hours long, but it will blow your mind!

    I wonder how much longer they can keep denying the more than obvious.

    Nuff said.

    Adeptus

  • A Lieutenant? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by EmagGeek (574360) <gterich@@@aol...com> on Sunday July 01, 2007 @11:09PM (#19712617) Journal
    Suffice it to say that a Lieutenant is not exactly going to be high on the "need to know" list.

    This is a hoax.. no aliens at Roswell..
    • by Fantastic Lad (198284) on Monday July 02, 2007 @04:07AM (#19714621)
      Suffice it to say that a Lieutenant is not exactly going to be high on the "need to know" list.

      Need to know what? UFO's weren't classified in the 1940's. They were new and weird. The military and political structures of the day were making it up as they went with regard to the super-paranoid secrecy structures we are so familiar with today. That's why the Roswell staff made the decision to broadcast to the world that they had retrieved a crashed flying saucer. They didn't have standing orders not to.

      --And I imagine that if you work on a dull little air training base in the middle of nowhere, when something like a crashed UFO enters your life, you might consider it awe-inspiring and important to all humans on the Earth. You might think that the rational thing to do would be to share news of it with the world. The gues at Roswell weren't paranoid presidential military advisors. They were Air Force working stiffs posted in the middle of nowhere on a boring little training base.

      Of course, when the brass from the important parts of the military showed up, they put an end to that. The gears of secrecy had been beginning to turn in Washington for a few years with regard to UFO's, and though there was no official doctrine at that point, when a UFO crashed in your backyard, the government had enough paranoid minds at the top to know it was in their best interest to lock everything down tight. So the Roswell staff was forced to officially retract the original story and replace it with the tin-foil balloon thing.


      -FL

  • by ruiner13 (527499) on Monday July 02, 2007 @12:03AM (#19713075) Homepage
    Many of the accounts of the crash site at Roswell and the parts recovered claim that there was a metal that despite being super thin, was flexible and impervious to damage. Ok... if they really had such a material, how the heck did the craft crash and scatter debris? If the material was that good, how did it come apart? I'd love to believe, but that part in particular has always made me a bit skeptical of the whole incident.

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