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Biotech Science

U.S. Scientists Create Zombie Dogs 1010

Posted by timothy
from the ooh-that's-chilly dept.
Alex_Ionescu writes "U.S. scientists have managed to revive dead dogs to life, by using a technique similar to cryogenation, in which the dogs' blood was drained and replaced by a cold, saline liquid. A couple of hours, their blood was replaced, and an electric shock brought them back to life with no brain damage. The technology will be tested on humans within the next year."
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U.S. Scientists Create Zombie Dogs

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  • well... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by darthpenguin (206566) * on Monday June 27, 2005 @02:59PM (#12924086) Homepage

    The article is somewhat light on facts. From what I recall, during drowning or suffocation, brain damage occurs in humans quite soon (10 minutes?). How is it that this process negates the lack of oxygen to the brain, allowing no damage to occur? Is it the temperature of the liquid used for replacing the blood?

    Also, the article has "Although the animals are clinically dead, their tissues and organs are perfectly preserved." followed immediately by "Damaged blood vessels and tissues can then be repaired via surgery." So, which is it?

    I suppose we'll have to wait for a real scientific journal to publish this before we find out much more.

    Also, another attempt at hibernation, this time in mice [washingtonpost.com], using a different method involving hydrogen sulfide gas.

    • Re:well... (Score:4, Informative)

      by ruggerboy (553525) * on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:01PM (#12924131)
      "Damaged blood vessels and tissues can then be repaired via surgery." I think this means gunshot wounds etc.
      • Re:well... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Rei (128717) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:09PM (#12924285) Homepage
        Yep. And the reason that they don't get brain damaged is because their neurons aren't dying. And their neurons aren't dying because they're not metabolizing, and thus needing oxygen. The brain is in hibernation, just like the rest of the body.

        Still, this is ubercreepy. Even the electrical shock at the end bit... sounds like 50s sci-fi. What's next? "The shock required is quite intense, so facilities doing this work will need to affix a lightning rod to their roof and wait for a storm..."?
        • Re:well... (Score:5, Funny)

          by lucabrasi999 (585141) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:14PM (#12924371) Journal
          Still, this is ubercreepy. Even the electrical shock at the end bit... sounds like 50s sci-fi. What's next? "The shock required is quite intense, so facilities doing this work will need to affix a lightning rod to their roof and wait for a storm..."?

          I can hear it now:


          Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Igor, would you mind telling me whose brain I did put in?
          Igor: And you won't be angry?
          Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: I will NOT be angry.
          Igor: Abby someone.
          Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Abby someone. Abby who?
          Igor: Abby Normal.
          Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Abby Normal?
          Igor: I'm almost sure that was the name.
          Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Are you saying that I put an abnormal brain into a seven and a half foot long, fifty-four inch wide GORILLA? IS THAT WHAT YOU'RE TELLING ME?
          • a script (Score:5, Interesting)

            by wattersa (629338) <andrew@NOSPaM.andrewwatters.com> on Tuesday June 28, 2005 @07:59PM (#12937575) Homepage
            Interior, large hospital emergency room

            We hear beeping sounds of monitoring devices; voices from the nearby nurse's station. The lighting is yellowish flourescent in the hallway for a sad, depressing atmosphere. It's a public hospital, so no one thought to have an interior designer make happy colors. The interior of the room is bright with white flouresent light.

            POV: facing LAUREN, just inside doorway. She's just been crying and is still wearing her street clothes.

            POV: LAUREN, looking into room.

            ANDY has just been wheeled into the room with a major gun shot wound to the chest. The wound is covered by a washcloth and shows some blood, but not a lot. He's behind a curtain setup so only his lower body is clearly visible.

            A NURSE (Asian female, early 30's) is facing away from us and is adjusting a piece of equipment.

            A DOCTOR (White female, 40's) is facing away from us and illuminated behind the curtain. She's dictating into a tape recorder between probing ANDY's injuries: "Bleeding from perforation of the left thoracic cavity 8cm from center of sternum." Pause. "Fracture of the fourth thoracic rib." Pause. "Wound track and cavity visible. Left lung perforated approx. 4 cm from inner side." Long pause. "Laceration of the circumflex coronary artery. Fragment not found." Pauses tape. (To NURSE) "Get me the chest x-ray please." Starts tape and continues indistinctly.

            Fade to black.

            Fade back in. More people are in the room. An X-RAY TECHNICIAN (Black male, 30's) is wheeling out the x-ray machine. It's digital, so the results appear on a CRT monitor in the room. The DOCTOR and SURGEON (white male, 50 and graying) discuss the x-ray and gesture to parts of it. They are ignoring LAUREN, who is still standing in the doorway. Finally, DOCTOR comes over to LAUREN and removes her bloody gloves.

            DOCTOR: Are you Mrs. Watters?

            LAUREN: Yes.

            DOCTOR: I'm going to explain what happened and what your options are.

            LAUREN: (Bravely) ok.

            Blood begins to drip onto the floor, which LAUREN doesn't notice but we do (center of frame between DOCTOR and LAUREN). NURSE puts absorbent towels onto the small pool that's forming.

            DOCTOR: Your husband was shot in his chest area fairly close to his heart. The bleeding is serious and we're trying to stop it. The biggest problem is that the heart was injured and we can't repair it completely without stopping it.

            NURSE comes up to both of them and stands there.

            LAUREN: What does that mean?

            DOCTOR: (ignoring her question) You have three options. The first option is for us to try open heart surgery. That is risky and means we have to stop the heart and use a heart-lung machine. The second option is for us to do what's called a "saline evacuation," which means we essentially put the body on ice for a couple of hours while we try to repair the heart. That's the most risky by far. The last option is for us to end treatment now.

            LAUREN: ...which one do you recommend?

            DOCTOR: I'm afraid I can't tell you that.

            LAUREN: (Confused) Why not? I have no idea which one I should do.

            DOCTOR: Liability reasons. (To NURSE) Come get me when she chooses.

            DOCTOR leaves the room, giving the impression of indifference to ANDY's condition and LAUREN's confusion.

            NURSE: Ok Mrs. Watters, you need to decide what to do now.

            LAUREN: (Confused) Well what did she mean by "put him on ice?"

            NURSE: It's where we take out all his blood and replace it with icewater.

            LAUREN: (Dumbfounded). Doesn't that mean he would die?

            NURSE: Not exactly. It's a technique they did a few years ago to save wounded army people. The heart stops but everything stays preserved and then you can restart the heart after surgery.

            LAUREN: Surgery?

            NURSE: To repair whatever damage there is. Your husband has a cut in his heart and they can't do anything about it as long as the heart's beating
        • by FunWithHeadlines (644929) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:19PM (#12924447) Homepage
          "Still, this is ubercreepy. Even the electrical shock at the end bit... sounds like 50s sci-fi. What's next? "The shock required is quite intense, so facilities doing this work will need to affix a lightning rod to their roof and wait for a storm..."?

          "Woof!"

          "Fluffy's alive! It's ALIVE! IT'S ALIIIIIVVEEE!!"

          • by CaymanIslandCarpedie (868408) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:27PM (#12924572) Journal
            Here [neistat.com] is a video of what it looks like happening to a goldfish.

            OK, not quite the same but similar and I find it somehow entertaining ;-)
          • by Thud457 (234763) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:34PM (#12924658) Homepage Journal
            Sweet zombie Jesus, how can you tell if a dog has brain-damage anyhow? They already eat their own shit if you don't stop them.
            • Funniest. Comment. EVAR.

              I suppose the serious answer to your question is that they can formulate controlled tests to observe and record the dog's behavior and response to stimuli, both before and after the experiment, and note any discrepancies. (i.e. when presented with a piece of his own shit, the dog chowed down on it before the experiment, but did not do so afterwards.)

              With all the experimentation that's already done on dogs, I don't doubt there's already a standard battery of tests to gauge their
            • People doo this too. You haven't been on teh internet very long have you?
            • by Afrosheen (42464) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:49PM (#12925536)
              They originally tested the methods on cats, but the cats were determined to be equally brain damaged before and after the testing. They would respond only marginally to any kind of stimulus and would not come when called.

        • by Anonymous Coward
          1 point 21 Gigawatts!@!
        • This hits home... (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:33PM (#12924651)
          On Sunday morning I was playing tennis with an older man I met in an online league. He was turning around to pick up a ball and he suffered a major heart attack and collapsed. His heart stopped for about 10 minutes on the tennis court while a girl from the court next to us performed CPR. He's in a coma in an ICU right now. The doctors said that stabilizing his heart is a primary concern right now, but that in the coming days discerning any damage done to his brain due to oxygen loss will become a primary concern.

          One of the things the doctor told us was that they were going to actually induce hypothermia in him while he is in the ICU. Recent studies have provided evidence that doing so may limit the brain damage caused by the loss of oxygen to the brain. Of course, in his case, it was extremely important (and fortunate) that CPR was started soon after his heart stopped, thus limiting the loss of oxygen to his brain.

          Hopefully studies like this will lead to more treatments which help people recover from heart failure.
        • Re:well... (Score:5, Interesting)

          by vivin (671928) <vivin.paliath@gmaAUDENil.com minus poet> on Monday June 27, 2005 @05:33PM (#12926109) Homepage Journal
          Yep. And the reason that they don't get brain damaged is because their neurons aren't dying. And their neurons aren't dying because they're not metabolizing, and thus needing oxygen. The brain is in hibernation, just like the rest of the body.

          So is there a temperature limit for metabolizing?

          Cell death is of two kinds - apoptosis or necrosis. Apoptosis is programmed cell death (when the lysosomes break), whereas necrosis is due to cell damage - and in this case, lack of oxygen. Cells that die due to necrosis show a lower level of ATP - so it makes sense that the cell was trying to metabolize the remaining oxygen and ran out.

          From here [bham.ac.uk], you can see that the increase in Ca2+ ions leads to chain of events that eventually leads to necrosis. Ca2+ ions over a certain threshold inhibits the energy and respiratory processes. I guess the question is, what is stopping the neuron from trying to metabolize?

          What I'm assuming is that it takes longer for the blood in the body to cool down, during which time the neurons can continue metabolizing. But when the temperature is suddenly lowered to 7C, metabolysis stops? But we couldn't just quickly lower the temperature of the body to 7C because it would take > 5 min for the blood to cool.
    • Re:well... (Score:5, Informative)

      by Binestar (28861) * on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:02PM (#12924146) Homepage
      Also, the article has "Although the animals are clinically dead, their tissues and organs are perfectly preserved." followed immediately by "Damaged blood vessels and tissues can then be repaired via surgery." So, which is it?

      They were refering to the use of this in medical emergencies. Put someone into this state, work on the damaged tissue with no bleeding or time crunch, then revive when they are fixed.

      I'm more interested in knowing who the hell is going to volunteer for this procedure...
      • Re:well... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by daniil (775990) <evilbj8rn@hotmail.com> on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:04PM (#12924199) Journal
        I'm more interested in knowing who the hell is going to volunteer for this procedure...

        A mortally wounded gunshot victim?

      • Re:well... (Score:5, Funny)

        by lucabrasi999 (585141) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:05PM (#12924214) Journal
        I'm more interested in knowing who the hell is going to volunteer for this procedure...

        George Romero? [imdb.com]

      • Re:well... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Carnildo (712617) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:05PM (#12924218) Homepage Journal
        Well, one obvious use is for open-heart surgery -- that goes a whole lot easier if you can stop the heart, and heart-lung machines aren't perfect. I think the first human trials will be volunteers who are additionally undergoing major surgery.
      • Re:well... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by kfg (145172) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:38PM (#12924716)
        Once upon a time, a long, long time ago, I was brought into the hospital for lifesaving surgery. . .but my condition was such that it was deemed I would die from the stress of undergoing surgery.

        This is the sort of person who will volunteer. A person who has nothing to lose if the procedure fails, but everything to gain if it succeeds.

        KFG

        P.S. I got better.
        • Re:well... (Score:3, Funny)

          by Mastoid (138665)
          Presumably someone turned you into a newt?
          • Re:well... (Score:3, Funny)

            by kfg (145172)
            Presumably someone turned you into a newt?

            It was an effective tactic, as newts do not suffer from any of the maladies that had brought me to that particular pass. This bought them time to stablize me and develop an effective treatment strategy.

            Actually, I was bit disappointed, as I had hoped to be transformed into a zombie newt and go out in search of amphibian BRAAAAAAAINS!

            (I admit it, I haven't had time to read the whole thread. Has anyone pointed out yet that zombies are, by definition, animate, and
    • Re:well... (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Chris Burke (6130)
      I think the line about damaged blood vessels and tissues is in regards to the reason why you wanted to freeze the dog/person in the first place -- some fatal injury. They are talking about the medical uses for this technique, and using it to save people who have lost a lot of blood, so that's where I got this impression. The technique itself isn't supposed to damage tissues, but if you resuscitate the person/animal while they still have the big gaping chest wound that would kinda defeat the purpose, so yo
    • Re:well... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Sosarian (39969) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:06PM (#12924235) Homepage
      Also, the article has "Although the animals are clinically dead, their tissues and organs are perfectly preserved." followed immediately by "Damaged blood vessels and tissues can then be repaired via surgery." So, which is it?
      Um both? If your blood vessels are damaged by a gunshot wound as stated in the article and you have massive bloodloss this would keep you "alive" by keeping you dead for a time while they patched you up.

      Personally I think the fluids would just drain out of whatever wounds you do have.

      I think a better application of this technology will be for these multi-hour operations where they want to repair heart defects or do transplants, in which they currently induce hypothermic states.

    • Re:well... (Score:5, Informative)

      by cmpalmer (234347) * on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:09PM (#12924272) Homepage
      There was a good summary of this technique as well as the hydrogen sulfide method in an article in Discover last month. This appears to be a very hot (no pun intended) topic in experimental medicine.

    • Re:well... (Score:3, Informative)

      by xfmr_expert (853170)
      Well, there is actually a Safar Center for Resuscitation Research [pitt.edu] in Pittsburgh. They have been doing Suspended Animation research for at least 10 years now, according to thier site [pitt.edu], for the U.S. Navy. They have been using dogs as test subjects, but apparently only until recently have been unable to bring the animals back to life without some brain damage. Their goal is to make it 2 hours or more with causing brain damage. The intent is for severe trauma victims to be put into a state of suspended anima
    • Re:well... (Score:4, Informative)

      by meanfriend (704312) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:35PM (#12924675)
      The article is somewhat light on facts. From what I recall, during drowning or suffocation, brain damage occurs in humans quite soon (10 minutes?). How is it that this process negates the lack of oxygen to the brain, allowing no damage to occur? Is it the temperature of the liquid used for replacing the blood?

      There was a recent article in Scientific American* talking about suspended animation that may give clues as to how this works. Cell damage does indeed take place during low oxygen states (hypoxia) when the cell's metabolism continues without sufficient oxygen available and allows free radicals to build up and cause cellular damage. It appears that in some organisms, when you reduce the oxygen to an even lower state or remove it completely (anoxia), the cells can essentially shut down thier metabolism into a state of suspended animation. In other words, either normal oxygen or no oxygen can be tolerated, but there is a 10 fold window of low oxygen concentration that can be deadly. I believe this is where the brain damage occurs. If you stopped breathing right now, your blood still contains oxygen which would get slowly depleted as the cells continue to respirate. Perhaps the key to this technique is to rapidly replace the blood with a no/very low oxygen content fluid that will transition the cells from normal oxygen to anoxia as quickly as possible an minimize the amount of time spent in hypoxia.

      This procedure has already been demonstrated in animals like mice though it is unknown whether humans can safely undergo the same conditions, as we (obviously) dont normally go into hibernation. Though we've all heard stories of martial arts masters lowering their breathing rates and body temps for extended periods, so maybe it is possible. It would be an absolutely amazing breakthrough, though I wouldnt volunteer to be the first human test subject ;)

      * I am not remotely an expert in this field, but my background is in biology. I hope my memory has recalled the facts of the SciAm story without too much error.

    • Re:well... (Score:5, Informative)

      by Ungrounded Lightning (62228) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:55PM (#12925633) Journal
      From what I recall, during drowning or suffocation, brain damage occurs in humans quite soon (10 minutes?). How is it that this process negates the lack of oxygen to the brain, allowing no damage to occur?

      The 10 minute limit is for slow suffocation at normal temperatures. Two things happen:

      - First, many of the tiny valves controlling the distribution of blood in the brain capilaries shut, trying to route the remaining oxygen to the neurons controlling things like breathing and heart rate.

      These valves are tiny muscles, which, once contracted, require power (from metabolization) to reopen. Let them be oxygen-starved for too long - about ten minutes - and they get stuck closed. Then, even once oxygen is restored, the blood remains cut off to the areas they control. (It does no good to raise the blood pressure to try to force blood past them: You'll blow the plumbing before they leak. Massive stroke.)

      - Second: As with the muscles, the neurons have continuous chemical reactions going on that cause damage that must be cleaned up by active, powered, systems. Turn down the oxygen while leaving the temperature up and the cleanup systems fail while the damage mechanisms continue. (Firing the nerve uses up additional power, making the problem worse.)

      Let this go on for more than half an hour or so without turning the air back on and the damage gets ahead of the nerve's ability to repair it - causing cell death. That ruptures the cell and releases a glutamate - which tends to force other nearby nerves to fire, consuming their resources and speeding their death, in the "glutamate chain reaction". This easily gets started in regions of the brain fed by still-shut-off plumbing. But with enough glutimate dumped it can spread to nearby areas that have adequate oxygen - because it's not adequate to keep ahead of the massive firing and cell exhaustion.

      The first mechanism sets the normal time limit. But the second is the final catastrophe.

      But diving sets up a condition much like suffocation upon resurfacing: Swimming underwater pressurizes the gas in the lungs, and the organism can remain active for some time before it starts to run out of oxygen. But then it takes time to get back to the surface - and the lowered pressure on the ascent causes oxygen levels in the blood and tissue to crash. Not good.

      Evolution came up with a workaround: The "mamilian diving reflex", so called because it's characteristic of all mamals - happened a LONG time back.

      When the reflex detects a deep dive (cold on the skin - especially on the back of the neck, I think), it modifies the valves' reaction to overall oxygen shortage: Instead of shutting off blood to "unimportant" (for respiration) parts of the brain, it causes ALL the valves to OPEN. Then if they stick they stick open. This risks speeding respiratory failure. But once (if) oxygen is restored, it allows it to reach ALL the brain. Get oxygen back before the cells start dying (after a half hour or so) and they all get the power they nead to clean up and get on with life.

      So if you drown in COLD water you can be breathing-stopped for a half-hour or a bit more and still be restarted with no long-term brain damage.

      This treatment seems to extend on that: Flooding with cold saline will activate the diving reflex, sticking the valves open. Then the rapid oxygen loss will shut down all energy-driven metabolism - both the repair and some of the damage-makers.

      Meanwhile, the deep cooling of the tissue (to essentially refrigerator temperatures) will slow the other damaging chemical reactions, just as refrigeration slows meat spoilage. (It IS slowing meat spoilage! And 7C is about 45F, close to the 40F recommended for refrigerator settings.) This is probably the main factor in getting past the half-hour limit on cold-drowning.

      Separate storage of the blood allows the replacement fluid to be optimized to cool the rest of the body at a more rapid rate than could be accom
  • by NegativeOneUserID (812728) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:00PM (#12924099)
    Ok, looks like taxes are the only sure bet left.
  • by rebug (520669) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:00PM (#12924107)
    New Gravy Brains(TM) brand dog food has the brain flavor your zombie dog craves.
  • Oh no! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by zalas (682627) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:01PM (#12924124) Homepage
    Oh man... I can see the flood of Resident Evil jokes now...
  • Big Deal (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:01PM (#12924136)
    I've heard stories of Keith Richards doing this sort of thing since the '70s.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:02PM (#12924150)
    The Russians did the same thing in 1940 [archive.org].
  • Brains!? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Zediker (885207) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:03PM (#12924171)
    BRA.... errr... BONES!!!
  • by GPLDAN (732269) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:03PM (#12924176)
    From the Desk of Paramount Studios:

    George, baby, love that flick in the theaters now. Yeah, brilliant baby, that whole cpaitalist pig dog thing, and the gore, man you are the best...

    George, baby, I was wondering if we could take lunch next week with you and Stephen. Yeah, we got this new story based on real life, we think it's right up your alley...
  • I Volunteer (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:04PM (#12924202)
    I Volunteer, Bring me back when being 26, working at helpdesk and living with your parents dosent make me a looser.
  • by sl8763 (777589) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:05PM (#12924209)
    The Good: Zombie dogs are much slower than the normal kind.

    The Bad: Normal dogs will not attempt to eat your juicy, delicious brain.
  • by nizo (81281) * on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:05PM (#12924212) Homepage Journal
    The picture that comes with the article sure makes this whole process look really appealing. It reminds me of the picture that the local news station shows when there is any asteroid in the news (a huge moon-sized rock hitting the earth). Aren't stock pictures great?
  • by Ken Broadfoot (3675) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:05PM (#12924213) Homepage Journal
    I have just gone through a time warp and it is April Fools Day, right?

    What year is it?

  • GRAAIIINNNNSSSS...Grains...
  • Not new news (Score:3, Interesting)

    by pthisis (27352) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:09PM (#12924293) Homepage Journal
    The Safar Center was doing these experiments successfully in 1996.

    I have no idea if they've recently done yet another incrementally longer period of exsanguination, as the article doesn't mention the time or a journal article name or anything.
  • by DanielMarkham (765899) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:10PM (#12924310) Homepage
    This is a follow-on to an article in Scientific American this month. Interestingly enough, the article concluded that cells stay viable just fine in very high or very low oxygen environments. It's the transition stage that causes all the damage.
    Hence the reason for injecting saline -- it takes the oxygen-carrying blood out of the tisses almost immediately, which is what you want to do. The SA article authors said this seems a little extreme to use in humans, and I agree. They've had some success with mice using Hydrogen Sulfide, I think, mixed in with air. Also, surgery for animals that are "dead" brings in a whole new line of specialties that we haven't developed yet. This is going to be a fascinating area to watch, imo.
  • Hey, now if someone's sentenced to multiple death sentences, you can kill him, revive him, and kill him all over again.

    Talk about extreme punishment ...

    I can just see death penalty advocates jumping all over this - "See, we'll just keep everyone we execute on ice for a couple of decades, so that if we've made a mistake we can fix it, sort of."

    And now we can torture terrorists to death - and beyond. Look out, Buzz Lightyear!

  • by free2 (851653) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:23PM (#12924518) Homepage
    7C is enough for many pathogenic microorganisms
    so if you do this long enough, watch the infections

    During the procedure blood is replaced with saline solution at a few degrees above zero. The dogs' body temperature drops to only 7C, compared with the usual 37C, inducing a state of hypothermia before death.
  • ObNethack (Score:5, Funny)

    by cswiii (11061) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:28PM (#12924576)

    What do you want to #rub?
    (w) - saline liquid
    What do you want to rub the vial of saline liquid with?
    (Q) - wand of cold
    The vial glows briefly.
    What do you want to wield?
    (w) - saline liquid (cold)
    You break the vial over the little dog's head. --more--
    The little dog yelps! --more--
    The little dog falls asleep.
    The zombie dog awakens! The zombie dog bites! --more--
    The zombie dog bites!
  • by BuckaBooBob (635108) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:39PM (#12924732)
    Just look at a list of other stories they are currently covering

    12-year-old girl gets divorce
    Goats recruited to fight bushfires
    Scientists create robot lobster
    The most dangerous day of the week
    Cookie trail leads to suspects
    Soldiers steal tank to buy vodka
    Bonking, brawls and booze
    Man gets $2600 for plaster Jesus
    New shop to turn away the rich
    Sticky stunt's disastrous end

    Drop the story and move on :)
  • by Vile Slime (638816) on Monday June 27, 2005 @03:40PM (#12924739)
  • by DCheesi (150068) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:01PM (#12924977) Homepage
    How do they know that the dogs have no brain damage? Do they have some sort of doggy IQ test to judge their before and after performance? With humans there are many sophisticated tests for various cognitive functions, but for dogs..? "Well, zombie-Fido scored 100 on the stick-fetching test, so he's obviously in perfect condition..."?
  • by SavoWood (650474) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:10PM (#12925085) Homepage

    Inigo Montoya: He's dead. He can't talk.
    Miracle Max: Whoo-hoo-hoo, look who knows so much. It just so happens that your friend here is only MOSTLY dead. There's a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive. With all dead, well, with all dead there's usually only one thing you can do.
    Inigo Montoya: What's that?
    Miracle Max: Go through his clothes and look for loose change.
  • by Wolfier (94144) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:50PM (#12925546)
    I bet they're going to redefine "clinically dead" after finding out what is still going on undetected after their "deaths".
  • by popo (107611) on Monday June 27, 2005 @04:53PM (#12925591) Homepage
    This sounds very, very questionable. I call BS.

    First off: What was the name of the doctor?
    You mean to tell me this scientific breakthrough is being reported to the press, and the name of the scientist wasn't reported?

    Secondly: Brought back to life with an electric shock?
    What is this Young Frankenstein? You have to be kidding me.

    Thirdly: Its being reported where?
    Can we get some additional sources please? It did happen in the U.S. afterall. ... and the last words are "... said one battlefield doctor."

    Huh? You're a journalist reporting on a major scientific breakthrough and THAT'S YOUR ONE QUOTE!? Not even a name!? You've got to be kidding me.

    Either this is absolute hogwash, or this journalist has the reporting skills of a nine year old.

    Either way... I'll wait for better coverage before I get excited.

  • by wing03 (654457) on Monday June 27, 2005 @10:51PM (#12928477)
    At the risk of offending the anti-afterlife believers and continuing the threads on heaven, hell, souls and the afterlife in general...

    I'd agree with the poster about someone going through this procedure and not having any memory of it since there's no brain activity to store anything.

    But let's say there is some sort of energy that isn't measureable by the tools we have now that you could call a "soul" (tm). Maybe it's bound to the body until cellular decay occurs.

    Besides, what ever happened with those studies where researchers put notes up on ceilings of operating rooms to see if there were any NDE's that actually found themselves floating up to the ceiling to see what was written on these notes?

God doesn't play dice. -- Albert Einstein

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