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Are you better off than you were four years ago?

Displaying poll results.
Yes, dramatically better.
  6588 votes / 21%
Better off, Yes -- reasonably, but not dramatically.
  8666 votes / 28%
Better off, but barely.
  2526 votes / 8%
Hard to say; sort of a wash.
  4459 votes / 14%
Worse off, actually, by a smidge.
  1527 votes / 5%
Moderately worse off.
  2702 votes / 8%
I'm dramatically worse off now.
  2450 votes / 8%
I will tell you below why this question is absurd.
  1348 votes / 4%
30266 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Are you better off than you were four years ago?

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm only better off because I'm not eating Top Ramen in my college dorm anymore. My Stock portfolio is at the same level...

    • by tompaulco (629533) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @02:07PM (#41540837) Homepage Journal
      I'm only better off because I'm not eating Top Ramen in my college dorm anymore
      I eat Ramen at least twice a week and I've been out of college for 20 years. Believe me, it doesn't get any better after getting out of college. I had more spending money in college than I do now.
      • by Mitreya (579078)

        Believe me, it doesn't get any better after getting out of college. I had more spending money in college than I do now.

        While I agree that expenses quickly rise to match the new salary, there must be other considerations here
        If you had simply graduated and got a job, you'd have more spending money -- I don't see how you could not.

        Did you get a large mortgage? Had kids? Are you supporting poor relatives? All of the above?
        Is your job an unpaid internship?

        I admit that the spending money hasn't gone up nearly as much as I expected, but it is certainly more than I had in college or grad school. You must be omitting some rele

        • Believe me, it doesn't get any better after getting out of college. I had more spending money in college than I do now.

          If you had simply graduated and got a job, you'd have more spending money -- I don't see how you could not.

          I know people that make 5x or 10x what they made in college and still have less spending money. Either they had a bunch of kids and a divorce, made colossal spending blunders (sure I can afford a mortgage on my 250k house with no down payment on my 70k salary!), or simply have a hole in their pocket and thus spend every cent they earn on stupid stuff the moment they get any (I can't afford a house or rent in a non-slum location, but oh look is payday and oooh shiny!).

          • by Pfhorrest (545131)

            colossal spending blunders (sure I can afford a mortgage on my 250k house with no down payment on my 70k salary!)

            What the hell would you be blowing money on that you could not afford a house that runs only $250k on a whole $70k/yr? That's a good chunk above the national median income and not that much above the national median house price.

            For comparison, I make a little under $50k/yr living in one of the most expensive cities in the country, apparently am making about the median income for people in this city (and in this city in my profession, and in my profession nationally, and just people nationally... wow, how di

    • by Antipater (2053064) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @02:57PM (#41541449)
      No longer broke and subsisting on Top Ramen. However, also no longer getting smashed and partying every weeknight, my only care being exams or a cranky professor.

      I'm honestly not sure whether that counts as "better off" or not.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by WillAffleckUW (858324)

      I'm only better off because I'm not eating Top Ramen in my college dorm anymore. My Stock portfolio is at the same level...

      I still eat Top Ramen, buy it for 17 or 18 cents, use it for lunch.

      Use the money I save from that to go to fancy places.

      • by xaxa (988988) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @04:47PM (#41542681)

        I still eat Top Ramen, buy it for 17 or 18 cents, use it for lunch.

        Use the money I save from that to go to fancy places.

        Except that's not a good meal on it's own. I sometimes use instant noodles, but I almost always throw out the "flavour" packet and add something less-processed -- frozen chopped vegetables are the easiest, but some chopped broccoli, fresh spinach, canned beans or chickpeas ... anything's better!

  • Both my wife and I changed companies within the last year and a half where we have better work environments and significantly better salaries. We're both software engineers.

    • Re:A big Yes (Score:5, Interesting)

      by TWX (665546) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @03:13PM (#41541623)
      We've both changed within our respective companies. I moved up and over for more pay and better coworkers, and she moved over to get a good change. We also bought a much bigger home in a better local city at the trough of the market and sold the old house only recently when it had increased in value 50% more, with good tenants in there for the year in between, and I just found a seventeen year old car that I've wanted since I was a teenager with only 6,400 miles on it. Her retirement portfolio also has recovered to pre-recession levels.

      We've constantly lived below our means. That's why, when the housing market and economy tanked, we could afford to buy a house that was three times the size of the old one. Had we been living at our means we'd have been screwed.

      Prudence and luck are what got us here.
    • by racermd (314140)

      Similar to you, I was able to find a better job in the same industry (generically, tech support) with a better environment (read: less stress), better pay, better hours, mildly better benefits, closer to home, against rush hour traffic, and quite flexible with regards to home life. The company my wife works for was gobbled up by a slightly larger competitor, receives better pay, has better hours, and better benefits now because of it despite being the same job in the same building.

      Whether or not that has a

      • Similar to you, I was able to find a better job in the same industry (generically, tech support) with a better environment (read: less stress), better pay, better hours, mildly better benefits, closer to home, against rush hour traffic, and quite flexible with regards to home life. The company my wife works for was gobbled up by a slightly larger competitor, receives better pay, has better hours, and better benefits now because of it despite being the same job in the same building.

        Whether or not that has anything to do with our leadership in government at any level is up for serious debate.

        And that's a major issue that the politicians face - when people are doing better they believe (rightly or wrongly) that it is because of their hard work but when they are worse off they blame the government for their woes. I think the government does not have as much of an effect on the fortunes of individual citizens as the people or the government believe.

  • Way better! (Score:5, Interesting)

    by talexb (223672) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @12:40PM (#41539743) Homepage Journal

    Four years ago I was working at a place I thought was fantastic, and was happily married. My older step-son was working his way through second-year university, still needing some assistance from me. But Fate had some bad s*** in store for me.

    Today, I am very happily separated, sole owner of my house (yeah, with the bank), and have an awesome girlfriend (and two more sorta-step-kids). And I'm working on contract at place that has its challenges, but is a much more comfortable situation then living in a Watership Down type of company. And older step-son graduated from engineering (with a B+ average!!!), got his iron ring, and just celebrated his first anniversary at a permanent job.

    Thanks for asking. Life is good. :)

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @12:40PM (#41539751)

    Why are there more votes for "I'm going to write a comment explaining my opinions!" than there are comments? Is everyone still writing?

  • by mellon (7048) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @12:40PM (#41539757) Homepage

    I'm better off as long as you don't factor in my shortened life expectancy due to the deleterious effects of the passage of time...

    • That's what I came here to say: like everyone else in the world, I'm now older and closer to death.
  • This poll is related to the presidential election as a measurement of how our current administration has affected the lives of everyday people. Events completely unrelated to politics have had far more dramatic influence on my life than the president has over the course of the last four years. Sure this may not be true for everyone, and in the interest of fairness I should mention that I'm 22 and my life may fluctuate more than someone who has been sitting in the same office for the past decade. Anyway, my
    • by coolmadsi (823103)

      This poll is related to the presidential election as a measurement of how our current administration has affected the lives of everyday people.

      Oh, I don't live in the USA, should I retract my vote? I hope no one is expecting the poll data to be accurate...

  • Absurd (Score:4, Interesting)

    by orgelspieler (865795) <w0lfie AT mac DOT com> on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @12:50PM (#41539903) Journal
    My net worth and family income are down by tens of thousands of dollars. But I'm better off. My in-laws moved to town (yes, this is positive; I have the most kick-ass in-laws in the world). I had my second kid. My son got interested in Lego. I moved to a new home closer to work and nature. I've had four all-expense paid trips to Hawai'i. I've written some music, read a few books, built some furniture, watched some interesting TV, lost 20 pounds, learned some cool stuff, met some neat people. Plus my wife's gotten really good at cooking. The list could go on. Yeah some shitty things have happened. Yeah, I've lost some good friends and family members. But life is what you make of it.
    • My net worth and family income are down by tens of thousands of dollars. But I'm better off. My in-laws moved to town (yes, this is positive; I have the most kick-ass in-laws in the world). I had my second kid. My son got interested in Lego. I moved to a new home closer to work and nature. I've had four all-expense paid trips to Hawai'i. I've written some music, read a few books, built some furniture, watched some interesting TV, lost 20 pounds, learned some cool stuff, met some neat people. Plus my wife's gotten really good at cooking. The list could go on. Yeah some shitty things have happened. Yeah, I've lost some good friends and family members. But life is what you make of it.

      Those two things together do not compute.

      • by JTsyo (1338447)
        Since his wife's cooking is better he doesn't eat fast food much anymore thus he lost weight.
        Maybe the improvement in her cooking has been that she now makes healthy meals.
        Could also be that now that the food taste good he can be happy with a small portion instead of eating until full.
      • I know. It sounds too good to be true.

        When you get really good at mastering techniques, tweaking recipes, inventing flavor profiles, butchering, and using fresh ingredients, you don't end up needing as much fat, carbs, salt, sugar, etc. And you get a lot more veggies, protein, fiber, that sort of thing. Example: I used to complain about skinless chicken (yummy fat juiciness was missing). Turns out, you can get skinless chicken just as juicy and tasty if you know what you're doing and have the time to practi

  • by jesseck (942036) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @01:07PM (#41540099)
    In the past 4 years, I have gotten a better job, bought my first house, left the military, and have 2 more kids. I an better off, but not because of Obama. I would have done that stuff anyways.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I an better off, but not because of Obama. I would have done that stuff anyways.

      When I succeed, I succeed on my own. When there is failure, it's because the government has kept me down.

      Seriously, though: politicians - president or congress - don't have much influence over the economy. They can't agree on a coherent policy without poking it so full of loopholes as makes it useless. Anymore, they can't even pass lasting legislation, and short term policies aren't going to impact the long term business cycle. To admit that would put a whole legion of pundits out of business, though, a

  • We sold our house for a net profit of about $100,000 and moved into a nicer place with a smaller mortgage, had a kid, got a raise and finally live in an area that can get DSL.

    • Wow that is impressive... I don't know anyone that has come close to that. One of my former co-workers recently moved to take a job in another city. Despite the improvements he made on the house, the value had decreased drastically and he took a serious net loss. One of my other co-workers recently had to move because his kids were growing, but his house and yard were not. He bought a nicer house, but he still had a little bit of a net loss on his old house (although it was not near as bad as the other guy)

      • What you need to do is to use his real estate agent.
        I think his name was Rezko.

      • Depends entirely on how long he owned the home. I bought a house in Portland (OR) and sold it two years later for a 5% profit. That was in 2003, before the bubble burst. I bought my current house from a couple who had bought it in 1974. They made over 400% profit on it (believe me, they certainly didn't spend any money updating anything...). It's pretty much only people who bought and sold in the last decade who took a beating. Friends of mine that bought places in the mid-90s are sitting pretty. I e

  • by antdude (79039)

    Life sucks/blows. :(

  • Life was excellent and improving dramatically for me 4 years ago, and the time between October 2008 and April or May of 2009 was probably one of the best periods of my life. For part of that time I was unemployed, but other factors kept things very good for me.

    Due to the death of someone who is more important to me than anyone else will ever realize died right about the time I was starting my current job. The period between June of 2010 and June of 2011 was probably the single most difficult year of my lif

  • In 2008, my household combined income was roughly $125k. I had a wife, a house, and a dog. We had car payments on two cars, had an HMO where I paid $20 to see a primary care doctor and $30 for a specialist, and I was a junior level sys admin. In 2012, my household combined income is in excess of $185k. I have a wife, a house, a dog, and a four month old son. I have car payments on two cars, have a welless healthcare plan where I pay absurd amounts for even the most basic of medical care, and am a senio

  • by Anonymous Coward

    A little over 4 years ago, I lost my job. I now have one.... so that is slightly better. However, I am making significantly less than I did with my previous employer. Having a job is better than none... I have a steady income, decent health insurance, I have payed off my car, and am slowly reducing student debt. However the pay stinks compared to my previous job and it is not enough to really aid me in working towards some goals I had set.

    The fact that I got this job had nothing to do with any claim of eco

  • Four years ago I was in college and renting a place with a friend. Today, I'm employed and have my own place. I have less time for the things I loved back then, and I'm not sure that if I still did them, I would still love them. I'm not sure if I'm better off. I'm different, but probably not better.
  • I'm still in the same job, still at the same pay. I have a kid in college, which the GI bill which we paid into proudly proclaimed it would pay for, but turns out they only pay about 1/3. The cost of living has gone up by 3% a year according to the government, or about 15% per year according to the price of goods and services. Insurance has gone up by 70%, the assessed value of my house has gone up by 50%, the value of my house has stayed the same or gone down. I still drive the same car as 4 years ago. It
  • I'm better off because of my actions, and the general advancement of society and technology, not because of government policy. If the US government wasn't constantly printing up counterfeit dollars and loaning them to Wall Street banks at 0% interest, to be loaned back to the government for deficit spending, destroying the value of the US dollar in the process, I'd be much better off, as would all Americans without top-level connections.
  • In 2008 I was supposedly on top of the world, just got married, had a little kid, was in a job for 7 years where I had been promoted and earning big money. Fuck how it went wrong from there - I should never have left (hindsight eh?).With the exception of my last job (over a year ago now) I went through 4 jobs between then and now, only losing the first three through genuine redundancies where I was not the only person 'let go'

    I got separated from my wife and son (due to job no.2 being the other end of th
  • by Jiro (131519) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @02:33PM (#41541143)

    Barring serious illness or death, most people are better off than they were 4 years ago because most people become better off as they get older (until the serious illness or death comes up). So the answer is predominantly "yes", even in a recession. Of course, politicians are not responsible for that and for a politician to imply that he is is basically lying.

  • by Anarchduke (1551707) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @02:56PM (#41541415)
    the overall entropy level of the universe has grown higher leading to the inevitable heat death of all existence.
  • Late 08, I had to take a 25% paycut due to shrinkage in my job sector and lack of work. Since then, my salary returned to normal levels, then increased by 20%. I got married, bought a home, traveled the world. I make about 1.7 times what I did at the peak of the recession.

    I don't by any means attribute that all to the government... A lot of it had to do with making the right decisions at work, focusing, and general progression of life. However, the economy has improved significantly since then; the lending

  • Slashdot skew (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @03:21PM (#41541729)

    Results are going to be better than average here due to the reader base. The average slashdot reader is a young IT professional who is burning some time while at work. A large proportion of us have begun to claw ourselves out of the "poor college kid" phase. Many of us are either just starting to get their first real income, or have combined a college degree and a couple years experience to leverage a significant income boost.

    Still, it is nice to read that a bunch of us are doing well. Way to go us, keep up the good work!

    • Re:Slashdot skew (Score:5, Insightful)

      by erice (13380) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @06:44PM (#41543859) Homepage

      Results are going to be better than average here due to the reader base. The average slashdot reader is a young IT professional who is burning some time while at work. A large proportion of us have begun to claw ourselves out of the "poor college kid" phase. Many of us are either just starting to get their first real income, or have combined a college degree and a couple years experience to leverage a significant income boost.

      Still, it is nice to read that a bunch of us are doing well. Way to go us, keep up the good work!

      I'm not so sure about that. IT workers, yes, but Slashdot dates from the dotCom Boom and much of the readership has been working for that long or longer.

  • by screwzloos (1942336) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @03:36PM (#41541895)
    Four years ago I was single, broke, underweight, depressed, living in the dorms, bored with and failing my classes, and had racked up thirty grand in student loan debt that I didn't know how to pay off. I played World of Warcraft to get through the day.

    This year I am still single, still broke, still underweight, still depressed, sharing an overcrowded house, bored with my job, on house arrest for year for a car accident, and I owe a hundred grand in restitution that I don't know how to pay off. I play World of Warcraft to get through the day.

    I don't see things improving anytime soon. I'll probably pick up drinking again once I am off of house arrest.
  • Better... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by khr (708262) <kevinrubin@gmail.com> on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @03:50PM (#41542029) Homepage

    I feel like I'm much better off... Sure I downsized homes, from a 2,300 square foot apartment with household servants to a 350 square foot one. But it's the location, from Pune, India to Midtown Manhattan...

    I've got a job that pays well enough to live in the heart of New York City instead of halfway around the world, and I'm a lot healthier and getting laid more than I was during most of my stay in India.

    And I'm sure, more improvement to come!

  • by Calibax (151875) * on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @04:21PM (#41542383)

    Four years ago I was in chemotherapy after my second bout with cancer (first was seven years ago). Things were looking grim. I couldn't work, I felt like crap because of all the drugs, and I was paying my medical bills out of savings.

    Today I'm in good health, I married in February and we have twins due in December, I have an interesting job that pays well, and we just paid cash for a new minivan. Short of winning the lottery, I don't think life could be better.

    I just wish that Obamacare had been around when I needed it. I would have $400k more than I have now. USA badly needs medical insurance reform and the Republicans certainly don't want to help.

    • by Calibax (151875) *

      Just to make it clear, I did have health insurance. But after my first bout with cancer the insurance company decided that cancer (of any type) would not be covered in the future, and almost tripled my premium for coverage of everything else. No other company would would give me coverage at a reasonable cost - one well known company quoted $1,900 per month if I paid the first $100,000 of claims per year.

      My understanding of Obamacare is that premiums cannot be raised because of preexisting conditions. Hen

  • I took at financial crisis hit before it had hit the public.

    I was working at NYC in a finance media consultancy (making market predictions based on the public reporting of financials and on a statistical content analysis of the finance industry press). We had a bunch of big clients that were global financials.

    We started to see really, really bad indicators in '07 and by '08 our big clients were starting to take hits, too. We lost a few big contracts as divisions were closed, deals were undone, and/or belts

  • Four years ago, my older sister and I were taking care of our aged mother and living in her retirement condo. My only "income" was Food Stamps plus small amounts of cash I earned house sitting for a friend. Now, Mom's passed away, and the condo is ours. I took early Social Security almost a year ago, giving me an income and lowering my food stamps, but on the whole, I'm better off. Please note that this has nothing to do with the economy as a whole, or the policies of the current Administration.
  • I switched companies and rectified being grossly underpaid, and I got gastric sleeve surgery and dropped over two hundred pounds. Now I have a new car and a healthy, active lifestyle. My life rules!
  • I found that quitting sm

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @06:21PM (#41543645)

    I'm finally allowed to buy health insurance (at any price), via Oregon's state-administered "high-risk pool". This was part of the Obama administration's health care reform package. The cost of the policy? A whopping $20 more than the lowest-priced no-mental-health, no-office-visit, deny-all-your-claims commercial option.

    Yes, you read that right. I live in a supposed first-world country, make $85k per year as a damn-reasonable software engineer, and the biggest improvement in a year is that I now have access to basic health care services.

    Hopefully this is a first stop on the way to total extinction of the health insurance industry. It's a large-scale humanitarian disaster.

  • Definately worse (Score:4, Interesting)

    by erice (13380) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @06:53PM (#41543937) Homepage

    Four years ago, I had an inspiring full time job with a company that seemed to be going somewhere.

    Unfortunately, where the company actually went is into the dust bin.

    Since that time, I've been a lot of time unemployed in large part because few hardware startups (which are my bread and butter) are getting funded.

    A short term gig with a crappy company abruptly ended today. It was somewhat longer and the company less crappy than the gig that I ended a few months earlier.

  • by slick7 (1703596) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @07:22PM (#41544195)
    Four years ago we, (the American populace) were not considered the enemies of State as the NDAA now considers us.
    • by jerpyro (926071)

      Yes we were, it started with the patriot act much longer than four years ago. The things you're seeing now are just fallout from that.

      Actually you could probably argue that it started with McCarthyism, but hey...

  • by hutsell (1228828) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @07:38PM (#41544363) Homepage

    Aahh ... I think see what you did there -- an informal (and a demographically inaccurate) polling to determine the outcome of this year's Presidential race -- the assumption based on the classic knee-jerk voting scenario: If I'm better off than 4 years ago, my vote is for the incumbent; if I'm worse off, then my vote should be for his opponent.

    • No, the point of the poll is to mock people like you who take the question too seriously. And to have fun conversations in the comments.
  • by SuperCharlie (1068072) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @10:17PM (#41545261)
    4 years ago I was a senior tech at a University, My wife was a University Webmaster. While not rolling in it, we bumped $100k/yr or so, did the suburbia thing, 2 cars with notes, debt up to our eyeballs, a monthly budget of bills and whatnot around $5k and pretty much blew the rest on crap... living the typical American dream.

    Then, we simply walked away. Simply put in our notices and said screw this mess. Dont get me wrong.. this isnt an indictment of those who live this life, it is that *we* decided not to live our lives spending 5/7th of it doing other peoples bidding, waking up to an alarm clock, living for the weekends, yada yada.

    We took our money, paid our debts, started a very very small web biz, bought some land, bought some tools, built a small house and crazily, live with no debt, off the grid, with a monthly budget and income that puts us squarely under the poverty line.

    We wake up when we damn well please, we work on our biz when we want, we wander around exploring when we want, we go fishing on Tuesday afternoons if we want, we laugh regularly when we ask each other what day it is... (ok I know hump day because of the Chive).

    So.. better off? well... I like it better. So I guess the answer for me is yes, Im poor as a hell of a lot happier.

    FWIW.. tomorrow is wood stove install day.. Im totally jazzed that we scraped up $500 for the stove and pipe and tomorrow I will be installing our winter heating, fired up by wood I cut last spring FTW :)
    • by Again (1351325) on Friday October 05, 2012 @11:56AM (#41559537)

      We took our money, paid our debts, started a very very small web biz, bought some land, bought some tools, built a small house and crazily, live with no debt, off the grid, with a monthly budget and income that puts us squarely under the poverty line.

      How are you posting this?

      • by SuperCharlie (1068072) on Friday October 05, 2012 @11:48PM (#41565955)
        I think of electricity as "the grid" but I suppose you are correct in that I do have internet powered by batteries and an inverter. I am working on ramping up, but for the last 9 months we have lived on a 400W inverter and 2 6-volt (series for 12v) golf cart batteries. We are charging with a gas generator and working toward solar. We run the gen a few hours a day to charge, or when I need saws or nail guns, and the rest of the time we run on the inverter. Our avg load while on batteries is ~100W with 2 laptops, a few cfl's, a wireless router and the cable modem. We just got a 2A/40A charger off craigslist which has really helped on gen gas/battery charging.

        So thats how I post.

        Side note.. got the wood stove installed just before a cold snap.. yay.
  • Way better off... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by JigJag (2046772) on Thursday October 04, 2012 @09:03AM (#41547945)

    ... just not financially. In fact, my cash cushion is gone, so now we live from paycheck to paycheck; good thing I have a stable (read salary, not hourly pay) income.
    I picked way better off because in the last four years I fathered two kids and there is nothing in this world worth more than that.

    On a side note, living in Canada, it took me a while to understand the subtle hint about politics regarding this poll since not everything in the news revolves around politics here at the moment.
    Finally, my wife started working again, and with careful management, we'll be able to rebuild our cash cushion. The secret is not to live above your means. I still use an ancient CRT television and don't plan on updating since it works great. I haven't purchased new clothes in a long while since the ones I have still fit. Really, the only expenses we have are in order: mortgage, food, utility & entertainment bills (electricity, water, garbage, internet, netflix), property tax, gas, insurance. But having a loving wife and two kids at home: priceless, literally.

    JigJag

  • by srobert (4099) on Thursday October 04, 2012 @12:10PM (#41550017)

    A better question: Are you better off than you (or your parents, or maybe grandparents) were FORTY years ago? Whatever the answer, why do you think that is?

  • by Admiral Burrito (11807) on Thursday October 04, 2012 @03:09PM (#41552059)

    Four years ago I had a Core 2 Duo with 2 GB of RAM and a 120 GB HDD. Now I have a Core i7 (Sandy Bridge) with 6 GB of RAM and a 256 GB SSD.

    Hooray for Obama!

  • by PhxBlue (562201) on Friday October 05, 2012 @11:38AM (#41559243) Homepage Journal
    Four years ago, I was in Iraq.

The study of non-linear physics is like the study of non-elephant biology.

 



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