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Medicine Science

California Study To Examine the Influence of a Healthy Diet On Patients (nytimes.com) 242

"According to The New York Times, the state of California is funding an experiment through The Ceres Community Project to test the influence of a healthy diet on the recovery of state Medicaid patients with long-term serious illnesses," writes Slashdot reader MonteCarloMethod. From the report: Over the next three years, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, and Stanford will assess whether providing 1,000 patients who have congestive heart failure or Type 2 diabetes with a healthier diet and nutrition education affects hospital readmissions and referrals to long-term care, compared with 4,000 similar Medi-Cal patients who don't get the food.

The California study will build on more modest and less rigorous earlier research. A study in Philadelphia by the Metropolitan Area Neighborhood Nutrition Alliance retroactively compared health insurance claims for 65 chronically ill Medicaid patients who received six months' of medically tailored meals with a control group. The patients who got the food racked up about $12,000 less a month in medical expenses. Another small study by researchers at U.C.S.F. tracked patients with H.I.V. and Type 2 diabetes who got special meals for six months to see if it would positively affect their health. The researchers found they were less depressed, less likely to make trade-offs between food and health care, and more likely to stick with their medications.

California Study To Examine the Influence of a Healthy Diet On Patients

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  • Food (Score:5, Insightful)

    by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Monday May 14, 2018 @08:49PM (#56611998) Journal
    Food is not an easy thing to get a handle on.
    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      Well in reality it is very easy, the problem is modern corporations, corrupt government and entirely worthless mainstream media. A good diet and just as important and how to prepare it, not just what you should eat but how to make it. So probably it should be taught in school because that is the only way it will work in a society based around greed and lies, at least there is a chance when done in schools under supervision. So teach people not just the elements of a good diet but how to purchase the ingredi

      • If it needs a class to learn it, then it's probably not easy (and what exactly will be taught in the class will be an unending source of controversy).
        • 2+2 is easy. My teachers went over it anyhow.

          Learning how to cook is easy. I've taken many classes to learn different techniques that I had not been exposed to.

          Many people have almost no exposure to cooking as children. Many have no idea how to prepare any type of food. A basics class certainly won't hurt.

          Just because something is going to be mired in controversy, doesn't mean it shouldn't be done.

          --
          "Where can I find the blue fairy?" - David

  • The distinction between nutrient, drug, and poison is largely mythic. The fact that doctors haven't been considering treating patients with nutrients before now is alarming.

    • by hey! ( 33014 ) on Monday May 14, 2018 @09:18PM (#56612180) Homepage Journal

      The journalist Michael Pollan calls the ideology of treating food like a drug "nutritionism". It has a very poor track record stretching back over a hundred years, when protein was the evil macronutrient and carbs were the good macronutrient.

      His alternative proposal: eat food, mostly plants, and not too much. By "food" he mean something your (or somebody's) great-grandmother would recognize as food, not some highly processed industrial convenience product.

      Take Cheetos -- from a marketing perspective there has never been a more perfect consumable product. Each puff is designed to give you a little burst of pleasure, but to have zero satiation value. It's engineered to make you eat forever.

      • In that case, he's making the distinction between drug and nutrient based primarily on how easy it is to run experiments. Drugs tend to have simple, short term effects that are easy to experiment with, while nutrients are more complicated, and often take longer to take effect.

        I don't think throwing up your hands and saying "this is hard" is good science.

      • By "food" he mean something your (or somebody's) great-grandmother would recognize as food, not some highly processed industrial convenience product.

        This is just another vague, ad-hoc rule that isn't based on science (and probably not good history either.....the food available to my great-grandmothers wasn't always great).

        Instead of dualistically thinking of "should" and "shouldn't" I think there's a more rational way of looking at it:

        Your body is an omnivore, evolved to handle a wide variety of foods, but it needs certain macro-nutrients and certain micro-nutrients to function. If it doesn't get those, then the body will suffer. So for example, i

        • by hey! ( 33014 )

          It's not based on science, but it has it's advantage that it's not based on pseudoscience.

          Look at the places where people have the best health outcomes -- let's say the so-called "blue zones". Are people in those places consciously managing their nutrient intake?

    • by be951 ( 772934 )

      The fact that doctors haven't been considering treating patients with nutrients before now is alarming

      It would be alarming, if it were true. Doctors pretty much always recommend improving diet for illnesses for which it is effective (like the ones mentioned -- heart disease, diabetes -- not for acute conditions, infections, etc....) But two big problems (not the only ones, no doubt) with a nutrition-based treatment plan are patient knowledge (knowing what to eat) and patient compliance (actually making the recommended dietary changes). This study attempts to improve those aspects by providing meals for pati

  • ..skipping the education and just give them the fucking food. I'm sure it will be cheaper and actually get some results.

    • Food that will keep for enough time to distribute it in prepared form typically isn't healthy -- contains a lot of preservatives.
  • Patients are generally easy to catch. Many are pre-fattened for flavor...what? 'ON' patients?

    Never mind.

  • I assume they will go lower carbs. But will it include sugar? grains? low fat?
    • The research will ultimately recommend a well rounded diet eating lots of fresh veggies, a bit of meat and a few carbs/starches here and there too. By the time it actually gets to patients ill in bed, it'll be:

      1) Healthy meal $20
      2) Burger and fries: $10 (go large! +$5)
      3) Some sort of super-processed meal-in-a-tray $2 ...and so it won't have the desired effect at all.

  • The researchers found they were less depressed, less likely to make trade-offs between food and health care, and more likely to stick with their medications.

    Who? The researchers?

  • California study finds cancer links during healthy diet, places warning labels on all healthy foods.
  • ... after a while they will be more healthy.

    *Tadum* *crash* *thud*

  • It's about time. People like MDs. Joel Fuhrman, Dean Ornish, John McDougall, Mark Hyman, and also Douglas Lisle, Ph.D. and Alan Goldhamer , D.C. have been saying this for decades. It's just crazy that health insurance or Medicare will pay $50K for a heart operation but won;t help people eat right to avoid the operation.

    For example: https://www.drfuhrman.com/libr... [drfuhrman.com]
    "CVD is ultimately caused by oxidative stress and inflammation that leads to damaged arteries. With an intake of low nutrient, pro-inflammatory f

  • Get to the bookies and put all your money on a healthy diet being.............(you always need a massive dramatic pause these days)................. good for you!

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken

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