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Medicine Science

New Immunotherapy Trial Cures Kids of Peanut Allergy For Up To Four Years (theguardian.com) 164

Using a new kind of immunotherapy treatment, Australian researchers have managed to cure a majority of the children in their study suffering from a peanut allergy. "The desensitization to peanuts persisted for up to four years after treatment," reports The Guardian. From the report: Tang, an immunologist and allergist, pioneered a new form of treatment that combines a probiotic with peanut oral immunotherapy, known as PPOIT. Instead of avoiding the allergen, the treatment is designed to reprogram the immune system's response to peanuts and eventually develop a tolerance. It's thought that combining the probiotic with the immunotherapy gives the immune system the "nudge" it needs to do this, according to Tang. Forty-eight children were enrolled in the PPOIT trial and were randomly given either a combination of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus with peanut protein in increasing amounts, or a placebo, once daily for 18 months. At the end of the original trial in 2013, 82% of children who received the immunotherapy treatment were deemed tolerant to peanuts compared with just 4% in the placebo group. Four years later, the majority of the children who gained initial tolerance were still eating peanuts as part of their normal diet and 70% passed a further challenge test to confirm long-term tolerance. The results have been published in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.
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New Immunotherapy Trial Cures Kids of Peanut Allergy For Up To Four Years

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  • Up to? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by schnipschnap ( 739127 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @02:03AM (#55039287)

    Four years later, the majority of the children who gained initial tolerance were still eating peanuts as part of their normal diet and 70% passed a further challenge test to confirm long-term tolerance.

    That sounds much better than "up to four years". Very refreshing to see a headline that understates research results :)

    • A proper /. headline might read; "Have Scientists Just Eliminated Peanut Allergies?"
      • Peanuts allergies dead, Netcraft confirms.

      • by nmb3000 ( 741169 )

        A proper /. headline might read; "Have Scientists Just Eliminated Peanut Allergies?"

        But then Betteridge would say the answer is no, and we don't want to upset Betteridge.

        A truly proper headline would be: CURE YOUR PEANUT ALLERGY FOREVER WITH THIS ONE WEIRD TRICK!

        • by lgw ( 121541 )

          Cure your peanut allergy with this weird trick invented by a Melbourne mom! Big pharma hates her.

  • When I was in school (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 18, 2017 @02:06AM (#55039291)

    nobody had a peanut allergy.

    Now your kid can be suspended for even having a granola bar (ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY).

    • by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @02:25AM (#55039327)

      nobody had a peanut allergy.

      Peanut allergies are a first world problem. They are rare in developing countries, where kids grow up around chickens, pigs, and goats, so they develop strong immune systems that don't overreact. In China and Vietnam, peanuts are a very common ingredient, and kids eat them everyday. Yet in America, it is the kids of neurotic Asian mothers who have the worst problems with allergies. My kid's elementary school has a "peanut free" zone, and 90% of the kids who eat there are either Chinese or Vietnamese.

      • by Kjella ( 173770 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @03:38AM (#55039437) Homepage

        Peanut allergies are a first world problem. They are rare in developing countries, where kids grow up around chickens, pigs, and goats, so they develop strong immune systems that don't overreact.

        Part of why it seems like such a huge first world problem is the gross over-reaction to "casual" allergy to protect a few hyper-allergics. I'm allergic to peanuts. I don't care if you eat a peanut bar in the adjacent seat or if the kitchen used the same spoon. Hell, I could eat that peanut bar and though it might cause me a bit of discomfort it wouldn't actually be dangerous. But if I tell anyone I have peanut allergy that tends to invoke "faint traces of nuts = lethal danger" levels of paranoia. Don't get me wrong, they exist and it's nice that we accomodate them so they don't die or anything but you sometimes feel those with a common cold and ebola are put in the same box labeled "sick".

        • by sjames ( 1099 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @04:03AM (#55039473) Homepage Journal

          This is important to understand. Practically all peanut allergies are like yours. People with the severe trace of nuts in the room equals death level allergy are extremely rare. Even they can be (carefully) de-sensitized enough to make casual contact harmless.

          • Well, if nobody is reacting strongly and they have little medical care anyways, like in a third world situation, they're just another child mortality statistic and there is no reason for anything about peanuts to ever come up.

            I'm sure there are lots of deadly problems they "don't have" because they wouldn't be able to measure things well enough to even detect it and label it.

            Obviously, excess cleanliness makes allergies a lot worse, but they did already exist before soap was even invented.

            If nobody is takin

            • by sjames ( 1099 )

              There may well be some 3rd World deaths from severe allergy that never get characterized. It would be hard to know.

              My point is more that in the 1st world, the paranoid peanut bans some schools implement are drastic overkill in most cases. The odds are that the one or 2 allergic kids simply need to not eat peanut butter or get it smeared on them. The kid at the next table eating nutter-butters isn't a big deal.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Rockoon ( 1252108 )
          I no longer tell people that I am allergic to dogs/cats (pet dander) when visiting them because of the insanity that follows. You would think that if I am reaching out to pet your dog that you would get a clue... but nope... instead they scream at their dog, swat it away, and whatnot...

          I blame the liberals. Seriously. They raised entire generations that overreact to everything.
          • This is part of our pampered, bubble wrapped society. I ask when people stay over if they have an allergy to cats and if the answer is yes then I will typically spend 5min extra vacuuming the area where they will sleep and then let them know we have some antihistamines.

            Frankly half the time the people who really need to be subscribed with a cup of cement aren't the people suffering from a disease.

            We as a society have labeling fear. "That's GMO, it must be bad or they wouldn't label it so." "That says gluten

            • This is part of our pampered, bubble wrapped society.

              Maybe, but have you ever played with bubble wrap? That shit is amazing!

            • Allergies vary depending on the individual. I have a strange one: red onions. They will give me a mild contact rash that goes away after a day or so. It won't kill me; it does make me rather unpleasant for a day or so, less if I had taken an antihistamine about an hour or so prior to contact. On the other hand, I know someone that was put into hospital for over a week from eating a food to which he was allergic. I have to take quite a bit of care concerning food prep when he visits, but it is no reason to p
              • how many people will have cheese removed from their dish because "lactose intolerance"
                Then they are idiots. Cheese is already fermented and safe to eat for anyone with lactose intolerance.

            • Frankly half the time the people who really need to be subscribed with a cup of cement aren't the people suffering from a disease.

              Wait...what? I think that might be a good saying, but can't parse it.

              • My compiler just spat out an error at word 12. I think it was meant to be prescribed. :)

                • My compiler just spat out an error at word 12. I think it was meant to be prescribed. :)

                  Okay. I wasn't sure - sometimes I get a little thick. 8^) I still like it though.

          • by famebait ( 450028 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @08:11AM (#55040067)

            My country is more liberal than yours. I see nothing like that here. I blame your flag. Just as well-founded.

            • I blame his overblown allergy to liberals.
              It has made him paranoid of any contact with liberals or liberal ideas so much that he sees liberals everywhere and blames them for everything.
              He screams at them, tries to swat them away, insanity ensues...

            • My country is more liberal than yours. I see nothing like that here. I blame your flag. Just as well-founded.

              Aren't crypto-conservatives a blast? I got stuck in a traffic jam with one, and he kept blaming it on former President O'Blama.

              So yeah, if a traffic accident is the fault of liberals, peanut allergies logically follows.

              • by lgw ( 121541 )

                Hey, I was in several traffic jams that were the result of either Obama or Hillary (as they were visiting town, and freeways were closed for hours etc) - as good a reason as any to hate a politician, if you ask me.

                • Hey, I was in several traffic jams that were the result of either Obama or Hillary (as they were visiting town, and freeways were closed for hours etc) - as good a reason as any to hate a politician, if you ask me.

                  Oh Gawd, I hear ya. When candidates or elected officials come through my city, its a first class PITA

          • by sjbe ( 173966 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @08:16AM (#55040093)

            I blame the liberals. Seriously. They raised entire generations that overreact to everything.

            Really? Peanut allergies are political now? I find it amazing that so many conservatives seem to find a way to blame liberalism for anything that annoys them. That is called scapegoating [wikipedia.org] and it says more about you than it does about them. I coach a high school sports team and I can assure you that conservative parents are just as obnoxious and over-reaction prone as liberal ones. I deal with both routinely and it has NOTHING to do with their political bent.

            • I blame the liberals. Seriously. They raised entire generations that overreact to everything.

              Really? Peanut allergies are political now? I find it amazing that so many conservatives seem to find a way to blame liberalism for anything that annoys them.

              Yes. By the way, they are crypto-conservatives. I don't want to venture into the No True Scotsman territory, but 1950's-1960's conservatives would not recognize these kooks.

              • Yes. By the way, they are crypto-conservatives

                I'm not familiar with the term. Guessing, I'd assume someone who feels they need to hide their conservative leanings, similar to crypto-fascists. I don't see many people these days who sneak around like that, they are proud to don swastikas, endorse the KKK, etc.

                • Yes. By the way, they are crypto-conservatives

                  I'm not familiar with the term. Guessing, I'd assume someone who feels they need to hide their conservative leanings, similar to crypto-fascists. I don't see many people these days who sneak around like that, they are proud to don swastikas, endorse the KKK, etc.

                  You have to look at the path of the Republican party since the early 1980's. They went from a party of conservative principles that could work with Democrats - also known as compromise - to a party that has ousted all th emoderates they could, and are trying to push strange concepts like a healthcare bill that removes healthcare form many people, and redistributes it as tax breaks for a few folks. And they try to do this without any compromise, while requiring 100 percent of Republicans to walk in lockstep

            • by lgw ( 121541 )

              Not so much liberals as progressives: when your whole political ideology is founded on complaining about minor issues, it's not that far fetched to get blamed for any sort of over-protectiveness or obsessive avoiding of minor harm. This used to be the provenance of the right-wing religious whackos, and still is in some parts of America, but for the most part there's been a generational shift over to progressives being America's over-worriers and moral scolds.

              Now if only there were a party for classic liber

          • I'm allergic to pet dander, and therefore most any animal's dander. I had a cat for most of my adult life, and tolerated the reaction until it became unimportant to me. I've had dogs for less time, but still. And for some times I suppressed my allergic reactions with sedating antihistamines, tobacco, then marginally effective non-sedating antihistamines, ophthalmic antihistamines, and now caving in and using a nasal coritcosteroid because the eye drops are just too damned expensive. Even the generic.

          • Again this "liberal myth" on /.

            So a democrate or republican would never overreact?

        • If your allergy is on such a low level, it is not called an allergy but an intolerance.
          Might even help people who suffer from it to grasp the difference.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        Nobody is fooling me. This is just some fake science dreamed up by the peanut lobby. Big Peanut will stop at nothing to make a buck, even if it means endangering our innocent children. Its a slippery slope, first make us think we don't have to worry about peanut allergies, next we'll be forced to eat Thai food and lubricate our cars with peanut oil. Go ahead, keep your heads in the sand. I warned you.
      • I've seen this sort of thing too with my Vietnamese and Chinese friends from college. It definitely seems like hiding your child from normal immune development at early ages is the biggest trigger for allergy problems. The nice thing is that if they can cure kids of a peanut allergy that can straight up kill you, there is a great amount of hope for people with mild allergies. And it doesn't have to be a doctor doing it.

        One of my kids has allergies to... well to *something* in the air. Probably pollen or mol

      • I kinda feel bad for any kid who can't eat peanuts or even more importantly, peanut butter; peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are like a staple of childhood in the US and Canada.

        • by Octorian ( 14086 )

          And now, thanks to overreacting school rules, we can't pack them as lunch for our kids. The best and easiest option, taken off the table. Grr :-(
          I only hope that someday this nonsense will end, and efforts like this one will make it possible to stop having such rules.

          • You live in a country where the school has rules what kids can bring to eat.
            Unbelievable.

            And you parents accept that?

            Shakes head

        • This is how the Dread Pirate Roberts developed an immunity to the deadly poison iocane.
      • nobody had a peanut allergy.

        Peanut allergies are a first world problem. They are rare in developing countries, where kids grow up around chickens, pigs, and goats, so they develop strong immune systems that don't overreact.

        And peanuts too. In Israel, peanut butter and milk mixed is often the first solid food that babies get, and peanut allergies are almost unknown.

        You are spot on regarding the folks who have adopted the avoid at all costs - neurotic- outlook. Those children have a messed up immune system because of it. Too much avoidance and you can end up being deathly allergic to almost anything with proteins.

        Related story. When my son was young, we took him with us one day to visit out horse for the first time. He go

      • by jabuzz ( 182671 )

        I propose a different reason for that. Those that had extreme allergies in those sorts of place probably die in infancy.

        So the infant mortality rate of 17.8 and 12.1 per 1000 live births in Vietnam and China respectively is a lot higher than the USA at 5.8 or the EU at 4.0, and compared to Norway and Sweden at 2.5 and 2.6 even the 5.8 in the USA is positively medieval.

        So yes they play in the dirt in developing countries, but the kids drop like flies, with a death rate of 87 in Chad for example, 53.9 in Paki

        • by PPH ( 736903 )

          Those that had extreme allergies in those sorts of place probably die in infancy.

          There was a project to develop an easily transportable food to alleviate starvation in some parts of Africa. The result was a squeeze tube of a peanut-butter fortified with some nutrients and other stuff that didn't require refrigeration. Kids, even babies could eat it.

          When asked about the possibility of triggering peanut allergies, an epidemiologist (part of the development team) said that they didn't see significant rates of peanut allergies in Africa. I think people in this sort of profession knows the

      • Peanuts are a common ingredients like pepper.

        That does not mean many dishes contain it.

        The percentage of Vietnamese or Thai (no idea about Chinese) who actually like and eat peanuts is pretty low.

        I doubt there is a significant difference in numbers of allergies.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Only suspended? You're lucky. In our school district, kids can be ARRESTED for possessing any kind of nut or peanut based food (remember peanuts are not nuts, they are legumes).

      Reckless endangerment or something... it's ridiculous. Bad parents refuse to properly raise their kids, so they end up with nearly lethal allergies to common things, and the rest of us are the ones who get punished.

      Fuck them.

      • I agree arresting kids who had no ill intent with their food is overboard. Use of peanuts as a deadly weapon is quite another issue.

        However, the British have > 90% effective treatments for desensitizing people with peanut allergies. Since 2009-ish.

        https://blogs.scientificameric... [scientificamerican.com]

        and other articles. Why is the FDA not jumping on this treatment and allowing it in the USA? Is it because we can't give credit to the results of other first world countries' studies? If so, this is dumb as rocks.

        Treatments

      • First of all, peanuts are nuts.
        Secondly, the definition what what is, is a bit arbitrary, e.g. a strawberry is a nut too. And a banana is a berry.
        Just pick up a plant classification book ...

        Bad parents refuse to properly raise their kids, so they end up with nearly lethal allergies ...
        We actually don't know how allergies develop.

        But if you do, write an assay and farm in your first Nobel Prize instead of behaving like an anonymous idiot on /.

  • by Narcocide ( 102829 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @02:07AM (#55039293) Homepage

    So sayeth The Lord.

  • by thegarbz ( 1787294 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @02:21AM (#55039319)

    Somehow a study that checked back on people 4 years after treatment get's converted to "works up to four years".

    Do these people even english?

    • Seeing how the whole media industry has been in continuous decline for the last couple of decades it's probably to be expected that most of the actually talented people have moved on to less... Dying... Industries. Then again there's also the clickbait aspect all commercially funded media is subject to and the general news media never really having been all that great at understanding actual science (probably because journalism falls more way more under liberal arts than under hard science).
    • This is a common way of expressing "can work for at least four years" in academia.

      The problem with former is that is can be read as "works no longer than 4 years"
      The problem with the latter is that is that is sounds hypothetical, leaving doubt about whether these durations have actually been observed.

      The ambiguity could be removed by expanding it into what the original is (fairly established) shorthand for: "has been observed to work for up to four years"

      • "has been observed to work for up to four years"

        So what? After four years they're out of work or something?

        • No, after four years is in the future, thus they are not able to observe it working. If they could observe the future, they wouldn't be in science, that's for sure.

          • Why not? Travel to the future, see value of stocks and crypto-currencies, buy today.

            In the future, become rich and stop working for money, continue doing research because that's what you love.

    • Since when has Science ever had anything to do with Science Reporting. Most of these reporters have no idea about science
    • Do these people even english?

      They don't know talking good like me and you.

    • Somehow a study that checked back on people 4 years after treatment get's converted to "works up to four years".

      Do these people even english?

      Unpossible!

    • by PPH ( 736903 )

      Do these people even english?

      Well, this IS The Grauniad. What did you expect?

  • do not want (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 18, 2017 @05:41AM (#55039611)

    My snowflake is perfect as is. You need to check your peanut privilege.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 18, 2017 @06:14AM (#55039685)

    You know what else "cures" a peanut "allergy?"

    Peanuts.

    Desensitization works for peanut allergies nearly 100% of the time. In fact, isolation from allergens typically only makes allergies worse. I had a peanut allergy as an infant. I almost died once according to my parents. My mom, being a well-educated and smart woman, ignored the idiot doctor's orders to keep me away from all things peanut (doctors only say this to cover their asses, there is no medical research that supports evasive therapy for allergies) and instead would put a tiny amount of peanut on my lip every day. I would break out in hives at first, but after a couple of months, my reactions went away.

    Now I eat peanut butter all the time and I have my mom to thank. Since learning of this when I was old enough to understand, I've never avoided allergens - and I've never had allergies of any kind, to anything.

    BTW, if anyone tells you their kid will die at the slightest contact with something peanut, they're lying. Nobody is that allergic to peanuts. It's all in their heads.

    • by GerryHattrick ( 1037764 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @07:28AM (#55039891)
      At least 10 years ago, journals were reporting that a microdose of peanut protein, increased each day (with careful monitoring) could desentise successfully after months. This study uses probiotics - interesting and wholly credible too, but where is the 'control' that probiotics specifically have contributed, and to what extent?
      • but where is the 'control' that probiotics specifically have contributed, and to what extent?

        If you sin and RTFA, they note that the role of probiotics is unknown, as there wasn't this control group. And that given how well this worked, they are interested in exploring that. The obvious question was why not do these obvious controls at the time of experimentation, and the answer is generally that there weren't enough participants to split them that many ways and still meet the N size to have significance.

    • there is no medical research that supports evasive therapy for allergies

      Really? Because people who have peanut allergies who aren't exposed to any peanuts have successfully not died from their peanut allergy 100% of the time. Using big words like "therapy" just shows you have no clue as to what doctors told you or the reasons behind it.

      BTW, if anyone tells you their kid will die at the slightest contact with something peanut, they're lying. Nobody is that allergic to peanuts. It's all in their heads.

      You're a fucking idiot.

      • Because people who have peanut allergies who aren't exposed to any peanuts have successfully not died from their peanut allergy 100% of the time.

        So people who aren't exposed to any peanuts don't die from exposure to peanuts. That's an utter truism and says nothing about the underlying question.

        BTW, if anyone tells you their kid will die at the slightest contact with something peanut, they're lying. Nobody is that allergic to peanuts. It's all in their heads.

        You're a fucking idiot.

        If it's really that clear-cut, why don't you skip the invective and spend a few keystrokes actually providing some evidence of documented death from casual contact with peanuts (as opposed to actually eating them)? It doesn't look particularly good for you [huffingtonpost.com] from what I can see.

        • Why don't you google yourself you moron?

          Citing a huffinton post article ... that is not even funny.

          This is from 1943: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/1... [nejm.org]
          This is more modern: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]
          This are show cases: http://nonutsmomsgroup.weebly.... [weebly.com]

          In what damn dream world do you live? I hope you never have kids. Damn idiot.

          • You're clearly confused. Why don't you try carefully rereading what I asked for: " documented death from casual contact with peanuts (as opposed to actually eating them) ."

            Your 1943 paper says nothing about peanuts. Your Wikipedia article gloms together "ingestion of or exposure to peanuts, wheat, nuts, certain types of seafood like shellfish, milk, and eggs" and thus provides no actual examples of death from casual contact with peanuts. The list of specific deaths in your "no nuts" (if only) articl

        • actually providing some evidence of documented death from casual contact with peanuts

          There's this thing called Google. Use it. People don't need to die to invalidate the claim, and there are hundreds out there.

          e.g. http://www.abc.net.au/news/201... [abc.net.au]
          Just the first google result. I'm sure you can find more if you don't rely on people spoon feeding you common knowledge.

          • I'm sure you can find more if you don't rely on people spoon feeding you common knowledge.

            There's no spoon feeding to it, brother -- I'm well aware of all the anecdotal hysteria out there. I'm just of the ever so humble opinion that anecdotal hysteria shouldn't be the basis for social policy. Get back with me when you have some actual data. I won't be holding my breath.

    • A former co-worker did the same with her lactose intolerant son. Started with a tiny bit of milk and gradually worked the amount up. Now her son had no issue... took about a year if I remember correctly.
    • BTW, if anyone tells you their kid will die at the slightest contact with something peanut, they're lying. Nobody is that allergic to peanuts.
      And despite your personal experience you are an idiot.

      If your mother had spoon fed you 2 spoons of peanut butter in your young age you likely would be dead.

      How can one be so suffering from an allergy and be so dumb about it. That is beyond me.

      Stupid idiot even giving advice on the internet. You should be jailed.

    • >

      BTW, if anyone tells you their kid will die at the slightest contact with something peanut, they're lying. Nobody is that allergic to peanuts. It's all in their heads.

      You're a moron. A friend Julie is that allergic. Her husband ate peanuts in the morning, kissed her after midnight and put her in the emergency room. She's an MD and didn't know why she's that sensitive for many years, before she discovered she's got a form of leukemia that amplifies immune system response.

      I've got a mast cell problem that does something similar, but with yellow jacket stings. 'Regular' allergens just make me hurt as though I've got the worst case of flu body aches ever.

      That of course d

    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      What about with adults? :(

  • The last flight I was on had to serve almonds instead of peanuts because a passenger had a peanut allergy. Here I am.. 30,000 feet.. and I'm eating almonds - like we're flying over Iran or something.
  • I remember being told (may or may not be true) that children who were allowed to play in the mud and get dirty were less likely to develop allergy to peanuts. Something about developing a tolerance. I forget the details. It's good to know we have a way of treating those who are affected, even if for a relatively short time.
    • who were allowed to play in the mud and get dirty were less likely to develop allergy to peanuts.
      Sure, because the mud in Germany is in any way related to peanuts.

      Playing like ordinary kids play surely has its benefits for the immune system. But chaining it to especially peanuts allergies sounds far sketched.

  • I wonder if something like this could work with other allergies. My wife has a terrible latex allergy which really limits where she can go (you'd be surprised at the number of places that have balloons for no apparent reason or use latex gloves to prepare food). Maybe there's hope?
    • Well,
      it could be worse. That reminds me at a couple where the woman hat an allergy to the sperms of her BF, and the BF had an allergy to latex.
      They used super expensive special condoms made "in the old way".

  • Instead of avoiding the allergen, the treatment is designed to reprogram the immune system's response to peanuts and eventually develop a tolerance.

    I can't help but think part of the whole 'peanut allergy' thing has to do with helicopter parents who micromanage their child's comfort beyond all rationality.

    For parents like this (helicopter parents isn't the best term, can't think of a better one now), a doctor telling them their kid *cannot* have a single peanut is almost like crack to them. It gives them an

    • (helicopter parents isn't the best term, can't think of a better one now)

      Back in my day, the phrase 'helicopter parents' didn't exist. We called them what they are: control freaks.

  • Took 4 years, over the course of 6 months per year, they give you shots of the things you are allergic to. After that, I'm pretty much allergy free from flowers, trees, weeds (ragweed is the killer!). Oh, if the pollen count gets stupid, it might bother me a bit, but nothing like it did. Once when I was 18, I ended up in the hospital ER, with anaphylaxis. Couldn't breathe, heart rate nuts, eyes swelling. After a treatment, was good as new. Use to keep an epi-pen with me for a while. The shots were WORT
  • If the alergies go away for a While, be it four years, be it longer, then the treatment does not CURE the Alergies.

    The alegies are on Remission. Is slightly different.

System restarting, wait...

Working...