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Biotech Education Medicine Science Technology

3D-Printed Ear Comes To Life After Implantation In Mice (gizmag.com) 25

Zothecula writes: 3D printed tissues and organs have shown real potential in addressing shortages of available donor tissue for people in need of transplants, but having them take root and survive after implantation has proven difficult to achieve. In a positive move for the technology, researchers used a newly-developed 3D printer to produce human-scale muscle structures that matured into functional tissue after being implanted into animals.
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3D-Printed Ear Comes To Life After Implantation In Mice

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  • by xxxJonBoyxxx ( 565205 ) on Wednesday February 17, 2016 @03:32PM (#51529549)

    >> human-scale muscle structures that matured into functional tissue after being implanted into mice

    So which human-size structure did you implant OH MY GOD THAT MOUSE IS HUNG LIKE A HORSE!!!

  • Wow. 3 posts so far and they were all about a certain part of the male anatomy. Congrats slashdot.
    • Wow. 3 posts so far and they were all about a certain part of the male anatomy. Congrats slashdot.

      Remember when Slashdot was for techies not 10 yo boys?

      • >> Remember when Slashdot was for techies not 10 yo boys?

        Many of us stuck around because SlashDot has always been great for techies who behave like 10 yo boys.
        Are you sure you wouldn't be happier here: http://www.itworld.com/ [itworld.com] ?

    • That could be because of this [gizmag.com].

    • Make that four. Thanks for your contribution!

  • now anybody can find an ear in a vacant lot while walking home from the hospital.
  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Wednesday February 17, 2016 @07:33PM (#51531315)

    the lead researcher was quoted as say, "it's alive! IT'S ALIVE!"

  • How about some real applications for this. For example, the articular cartilage in my shoulder (the cartilage cap on the humerus) has worn away completely. In addition, my labrum, and the menisci in my knees are screwed (thanks American football!) and will need eventual operations.

    Nowadays people simply get the whole shoulder/knee/hip replaced and it's never the same. It would have been wonderful if the surgeon could have replaced that tissue with new cartilage as opposed to microfractures or teflon equi

  • You know this is coming... Why replace boring human ears when you can make some cool Elf or Vulcan ears?

Genetics explains why you look like your father, and if you don't, why you should.

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