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The Military Science

West Point and Marines Launch Open Cyber Conflict Journal 31

rumint writes: The Army Cyber Institute at West Point and the Marine Corps Cyberspace Command just launched an open journal studying cyber conflict — Cyber Defense Review. It focuses on strategy, operations, tactics, history, ethics, law and policy in the cyber domain. The Cyber Defense Review is positioning itself as the leading online and print journal for issues related to cyber conflict for military, industry, professional and academic scholars, practitioners and operators interested providing timely and important research to advance the body of knowledge in an inherently multi-disciplinary field.
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West Point and Marines Launch Open Cyber Conflict Journal

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  • Keep mission critical stuff offline, or on a network not running standard protocols

    i dont want the internet to go down everytime some random country wants to get in a pissing contest with another country. This doesnt mean we dont need to take cyber security seriously, we do. but the issue is that cyber warfare should not even be a blip on the radar as anything related to the military should NOT be on the internet!
    • But there are things that need to be communicated between separate entities, and while it may not be War Games incarnate, I can see how malicious disruption of some things like scheduled bank transfers, etc. could cause some panic and mayhem. Think of it as the newest layer of SIGINT

    • by Dutch Gun ( 899105 ) on Sunday February 15, 2015 @03:09AM (#49058691)

      My understanding is that the military does have a completely isolated network for critical combat communication, but like any other global-scale organization, they're still probably reliant on the now-civilian internet because of the efficient communication it provides. For instance, communication with contractors, other countries' military forces, and so on are all vital for day to day operations, and probably can't be accomplished with a military-only system because of the sheer scale and scope it would require.

      I just don't think it's as simple as saying "the military should not be on the internet". They either have to try to use it safely and securely, build a completely separate and parallel internet, or go without it. Granted, there's obviously a percentage of material that should always be air-gapped for maximum security, but the bulk of bureaucratic day to day communication and coordination only needs to be reasonably secure, and can probably safely live on the standard internet given reasonable precautions.

      • My understanding is that the military does have a completely isolated network for critical combat communication, but like any other global-scale organization, they're still probably reliant on the now-civilian internet because of the efficient communication it provides. For instance, communication with contractors, other countries' military forces, and so on are all vital for day to day operations, and probably can't be accomplished with a military-only system because of the sheer scale and scope it would require.

        I just don't think it's as simple as saying "the military should not be on the internet". They either have to try to use it safely and securely, build a completely separate and parallel internet, or go without it. Granted, there's obviously a percentage of material that should always be air-gapped for maximum security, but the bulk of bureaucratic day to day communication and coordination only needs to be reasonably secure, and can probably safely live on the standard internet given reasonable precautions.

        They have more than a few, and I seriously doubt very much reliance on the Internet because even mediumish sized businesses use private connections between themselves rather than some VPN over the public Internet for critical communications. I'm not saying they don't use the Internet, because you can get to it from their non-secure networks, but their private networks are comprehensive. Anything classified is on those air gapped networks.

        Anyway, the purpose of our military is to defend US. They've got th

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Keep mission critical stuff offline, or on a network not running standard protocols

      Well, (depending on the mission) "mission critical stuff" must be online and use standard protocols... that's the whole idea with military networks actually!
      As a Greek, in case of a military conflict, i depend on standard protocols to communicate with other Greeks (and NATO allies), plus anyone trying to communicate must be online...

      i dont want the internet to go down everytime some random country wants to get in a pissing contest with another country. This doesnt mean we dont need to take cyber security seriously, we do. but the issue is that cyber warfare should not even be a blip on the radar as anything related to the military should NOT be on the internet!

      Oh... "the internet"...
      The "military mission critical networks" (usually) are not in "the internet" - CYBER attacks does not only mean internet attacks (or "internet" does not o

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      Keep mission critical stuff offline, or on a network not running standard protocols

      Airgaps don't work, Stuxnet proved you can still take down an airgapped network (face it - airgaps also mean old vulnerabilities don't get patched because it's way less convenient).

      And proprietary protocols? They exist too.

      But you know what? All this specialty stuff costs way more money. And then you wonder why the military is spending $200 on a network card that can barely do Gigabit speeds, when they can buy a GigE cards f

      • by khasim ( 1285 )

        Airgaps don't work, ...

        Yes, they do.

        ... Stuxnet proved you can still take down an airgapped network ...

        It's not whether an attack is still possible. It's about reducing the number of people who can successfully attack it.

        Stuxnet, as far as I know, depended upon someone physically smuggling in a USB device loaded with 0 day exploits.

        So the airgap worked. But their physical security failed.

        Not to mention any means of verifying what is running on their systems.

      • yeh right you do know that in order to develop stuxnet they had to build a compete copy of one of those cascades only 3 or 4 nation states have that level of sophistication
  • Hard to understand why any of this is complicated in a real full out war.

    Smash the enemy communications networks and they're not on the internet at all at that point. What is left is whatever your own military hardened communications networks are... and all you have to do there is keep the battered remnants of the enemy out of your own systems.

    That is assuming a small engagement.

    Assuming a big one... the issue is best left to communications specialists that will be tasked with keeping systems linked to the

  • Target and Sony and some banks were hacked.

    The end.

    Now, let's start the journal about how we rip out all this candy-ass Internet shit and do it right this time.

    • Circuit Switched forever and some where Vint Cerf is crying and rocking backwards and forwards :-)
  • They could start by not hosting it on Microsoft-IIS/7.5 ..

Order and simplification are the first steps toward mastery of a subject -- the actual enemy is the unknown. -- Thomas Mann

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