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ISS Earth at Night Photos Crowdsourced For Science 13

Posted by samzenpus
from the worth-a-thousand-words dept.
teleyinex writes The Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) is leading a project called Cities at Night to catalog the images taken by astronauts from the ISS. The project uses the platform Crowdcrafting powered by the open source software PyBossa to catalog images in cities, stars or other objects, as well as geo-reference them."
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ISS Earth at Night Photos Crowdsourced For Science

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  • by jeffb (2.718) (1189693) on Sunday August 17, 2014 @02:19PM (#47689917)

    I'm intrigued. This project seems like a more engaging and worthwhile use of my time than the crowdsourced editing of Slashdot summaries.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by teleyinex (1196425)
      Thanks ;-) I'm the lead developer of Crowdcrafting and its technology PyBossa [pybossa.com] where you can contribute not only to this amazing project, but others like Rural Geolocator [crowdcrafting.org] developed by the Public Health Computing group at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel. Rural Geolocator is geo-referencing houses to fight Malaria, so if you are tired of really amazing pictures from ISS join us also in that project. It's pretty helpful and amazing too :-) Cheers, Daniel PS: Note PyBossa is open-s
  • Melissa at NASA says more than "...taken by astronauts on the station are the highest-resolution night imagery available from orbit..." [kde.org], really? Is the resolution better than 1.3nm? Till that is given this is nothing more than puffery on their part.
    • Melissa at NASA says more than "...taken by astronauts on the station are the highest-resolution night imagery available from orbit..."

      What?

      [kde.org], really?

      What?

      Is the resolution better than 1.3nm?

      At the risk of repeating myself... what?

  • Back when the shuttle was flying and NASA-TV covered the missions, if the crew was sleeping they would often just point the camera at the ground and broadcast that feed. It is a lot harder to identify a part of the earth than you might think, especially when you don't have a good idea of which direction is North.

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