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Match.com, Mensa Create Dating Site For Geniuses 561

Posted by samzenpus
from the smart-in-love dept.
mpicpp writes in with news about a new dating opportunity for Mensa members. It takes a special person to join Mensa. For one, the elite society only takes individuals with IQ scores in the 98th percentile, meaning just 1 in 50 Americans is eligible. This exclusivity — some might say snobbery — is part of Mensa's lore. Early Mensans in Britain walked around with yellow buttons, organizational publications once referred to non-Mensa members as "Densans," and last year, a top Mensa member and tester called anyone with an IQ of 60 a "carrot." In short, you don't always join Mensa because you think you're smart. You join to be set apart from most people, who are, as one member put it: "mundane." But a new partnership between American Mensa and online dating giant Match.com offers a new, enticing reason to join the society of geniuses: true love. Beginning this week, members of the brainiac group can connect through a separate, exclusive dating service called Mensa Match. In addition, Match.com members can add a special Mensa badge to their profiles, signaling a specific interest in connecting with a single person with a confirmed genius-level IQ score.
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Match.com, Mensa Create Dating Site For Geniuses

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 26, 2014 @12:38AM (#47321703)

    I'm smart, maybe not mensa smart (don't really care either way) but fuck hanging out with other aholes like me!

    • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @02:43AM (#47322227)

      I'm smart, maybe not mensa smart (don't really care either way) but fuck hanging out with other aholes like me!

      OP is a bit snobbish itself.

      People (by and large... certainly there are exceptions) join MENSA so that they can converse with other people with similar mental character and interests. Just exactly how some people join motorcycle clubs because they like motorcycles and want to discuss them and appreciate them with people of similar interest, someone might join MENSA because they like talking about physics -- or even crossword puzzles -- with people who are like themselves.

      There is no need to try to suggest that is "snobbery" of any kind. Would you call a motorcycle gang "snobs"? Or stamp collectors? MENSA is a social club, nothing more.

      And by the way, a bit of history: MENSA members did sometimes wear small yellow pins, like tie tacks but about 1/8" diameter, like those little pins you stick in maps -- not badges -- simply so that they could find each other in a crowd. It wasn't snobbery, it was subtle (very subtle) identification. The reason was because more obvious identification made them targets of violence for bigots and other idiots.

      • by fyngyrz (762201) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @02:47AM (#47322237) Homepage Journal

        Would you call a motorcycle gang "snobs"?

        Well, probably not if you want to survive the day...

      • by fractoid (1076465)
        Well, to be fair, people who ride motorcycles are unarguably better.
      • by 91degrees (207121) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @05:08AM (#47322659) Journal
        If I wanted to join a motorcycle club or a stamp collector club I'd be welcomed without any qualification. My interest would be enough. They'd be delighted to tell me about their bikes or stamps and encourage me to learn more. They'd probably be a little surprised if I didn't have a bike or a stamp collection, but they'd encourage me to get one and not look down their nose at me if I didn't have one.
        • They'd probably be a little surprised if I didn't have a bike or a stamp collection, but they'd encourage me to get one and not look down their nose at me if I didn't have one.

          Probably true in the case of the stamp collection, in basically all cases. But a lot of motorcyclists will look down on you for driving a 'cage' down the road.

          I personally enjoy a cage when it is a roll cage, but different strokes [across a cheese grater] for different folks.

          • by jythie (914043)
            Yeah, but often they will happily hook you up with their favorite dealer or someone they know trying to unload an old bike. I have yet to see a mensa member say "oh, you did not pass the IQ test, but I think it is cool that you want to go in so here are some things that will get you going".
        • by mlw4428 (1029576)
          I don't think that intelligence (perceived or not) is equatable to a hobby.You can't get "more intelligent" and those few that are true blue geniuses didn't just start being a genius the way you or I go out and start stamp collection. It's a biological trait, not a sociological construct.
        • by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @09:32AM (#47323697)

          I once tried to join Mensa. I tried the test me and they told me my brain wasn't good enough. When I asked if a brain transplant would help, they looked at me as if I was an idiot.

      • by gsslay (807818) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @05:36AM (#47322727)

        so that they can converse with other people with similar mental character and interests

        It's a fair point, but what exactly is being shared? Having a shared high IQ is no guarantee at all of the shared or compatible interests, personality, life aims or values. All the kind of stuff that helps in a social club, and relationship most definitely needs.

        The only thing they have in common is an interest in knowing how smart they, and other people are, by one particular yardstick. As interest go, that's pretty shallow.

        • The only thing they have in common is an interest in knowing how smart they, and other people are, by one particular yardstick. As interest go, that's pretty shallow.

          That's simply not true. I met someone in an L.A. MENSA group. Within their group they have a rocketry club, and a movie-night club, and a poetry club, and many more.

          So what's wrong with that?

      • by mcvos (645701) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @05:54AM (#47322775)

        There is no need to try to suggest that is "snobbery" of any kind. Would you call a motorcycle gang "snobs"? Or stamp collectors? MENSA is a social club, nothing more.

        Exactly. I don't know much about Mensa, because I've never felt the need to join. I'm pretty sure most of the people around me would qualify, but that also means that we already have plenty of smart people to have intellectual discussions with. My sister, however, studied sports, got surrounded by other sporty people, and eventually started to miss contact with other smart people, so she joined Mensa, and now she talks about all the game events and motorcycle trips they have and all the interesting people she meets there. It fills a need for her that for me is already filled in other ways.

      • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

        People (by and large... certainly there are exceptions) join MENSA so that they can converse with other people with similar mental character and interests.

        Pretty much this. As an example, Throughout my life and career I've been very fast on "uptake". Even in high school, I'd read the textbooks, and then sit in class, kinda bored.

        In my career, it continued. Oddly that was around a lot of intelligent people. But while most concepts needed explained several times, I had figured out what the speaker said and meant the first time he said it. An awkward world, being both interested and bored at the same time.

        Point is, it isn't about snobbery. If I were to draw

    • That, my friend, is the reason I never joined Mensa. They're a bag of dicks.
    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      I was friends with a couple of Mensa members who had been past presidents of the local chapter. They did describe it as basically a social scene. If you showed up at a Mensa party you might not realize that the people were all above average intelligence because they didn't hang out chatting about intellectual stuff but instead drank beer and talked about the same boring stuff everyone else does and meet people of the appropriate sex. And because it was based on IQ and not upon achievements, the members c

  • IF.. (Score:4, Interesting)

    by TechyImmigrant (175943) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @12:40AM (#47321709) Journal

    If they were that smart they would know that the IQ test is neither a valid no reliable test for comparisons between groups, only within groups.

    • Re:IF.. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Brett Buck (811747) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @12:55AM (#47321789)

      It's not particularly good among "groups", either.

      The idea that you would join a society dedicated to separating you from "regular people" based on your supposed superior intelligence is a pretty strange notion. Most of the people who I know are Mensa members are the type that couldn't get accepted to any other club.

      • by AK Marc (707885)

        The idea that you would join a society dedicated to separating you from "regular people" based on your supposed superior intelligence is a pretty strange notion. Most of the people who I know are Mensa members are the type that couldn't get accepted to any other club.

        The Mensa groups I attended (in more than one area) were more like bridge clubs. They sat around and played games, while gossiping. They didn't interest me.

      • >It's not particularly good among "groups", either.

        It's a ranking test designed for the classroom. You fire a bunch of questions, the same ones at the subjects and rank them in order of their results. There should be many questions. That is the IQ test. That's why it's a 'Q' for quotient, not any other sort of metric. It ranks within a group in the same testing context.
        As a test it has no power to test an absolute level of intelligence. Just a relative ranking measure, and a sloppy one at that, within a

      • by ruir (2709173)
        And why should certain people need to meet people from "regular" people? Well, for me, and luckily over different periods of my life, I found people like me, talking about cars, the football, religion or TV/fucking idols does not cut it out.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      They don't have enough real-world experience at the young age most of them get their certificates to actually comprehend that - just an analytical ability that at their age is ahead of the curve; mostly due to having parents that actually read to them, etc. Most don't re-test as adults for a good reason. "IQ scales for life.. you don't need to re-test," they'll drone, spouting nonsense that can be disproven with any reasonably sized statistical sample set. Went to a couple of Mensa open days when I was a ki

    • Re:IF.. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Beck_Neard (3612467) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @01:18AM (#47321909)

      As the article says, that's irrelevant because it's a tribe affiliation. When it comes to these things, logic and intelligence are completely overwhelmed and suppressed. That's how our brains work. Ever notice how all so-called "freethought" and "rationalist" groups soon turn into hilariously ironic examples of conformity and groupthink?

    • If they were that smart they would know that the IQ test is neither a valid no reliable test for comparisons between groups, only within groups.

      This.

      Someone once said that IQ tests only measure how good you are at doing IQ tests. I would put it another way: they only measure a certain kind of intelligence -- the kind that is good at solving logical puzzles. Not necessarily the kind that excels at sports, arts, empathy, ethics, etc. As the OP says, they might be a proxy for ranking within groups, but not between them.

      • >they might be a proxy for ranking within groups
        That's what the test was designed for.

      • Re:IF.. (Score:4, Informative)

        by sFurbo (1361249) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @02:39AM (#47322217)
        Intelligence (as measured by Spearman's g factor) is one of the best predictors for pretty much any measure of success or talent. People who excel at art or sports are also people with high g. The IQ test has one of the highest correlations Spearman's g of any test, so IQ test measures a lot more than how good you are at doing IQ tests.
      • by 91degrees (207121)
        There is a fairly strong correlation between them and other indications of intelligence, such as skill at chess, academic success or business success.
    • by Krishnoid (984597)

      Well, it may not be all that universally useful [dilbert.com].

    • Yes, but vanity seems to overcome this. The whole simplistic notion of a single score to describe a mental ability that is as broad as "intelligence" is lacking in scientific rigour. But apparently clever people are too clever to need rigour.

  • I thought this is why we have so many Regional Gatherings? I'll wager a higher success rate for three days at HalloweeM vs a year long match.com account any day.

  • by CycleMan (638982) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @12:56AM (#47321793)
    Match.com's press release includes a hilarious "heat map listing where the smartest singles live," by mapping where Ivy League grads live. Apparently graduates of Stanford, U Chicago, CalTech, UC Berkeley, Northwestern, etc. aren't as smart. More likely, they're just not as rich and historically connected to Daddy's alma mater. http://blog.match.com/wp-conte... [match.com]
    • by billstewart (78916) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @02:23AM (#47322163) Journal

      The primary distinguisher of the Ivy League schools isn't that they're rich or that they're exceptionally high quality (though generally they are.) They're a group of colleges that a century or so ago made an agreement with each other not to have athletic scholarships, so the students could play amateur sports against each other instead of having to compete with semi-professionals. Yes, occasionally a student at the Ivies is good enough to get into the NFL or NHL, but they've got to spend time being a student as well.

      • by cyn1c77 (928549) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @03:13AM (#47322337)

        The primary distinguisher of the Ivy League schools isn't that they're rich or that they're exceptionally high quality (though generally they are.) They're a group of colleges that a century or so ago made an agreement with each other not to have athletic scholarships, so the students could play amateur sports against each other instead of having to compete with semi-professionals. Yes, occasionally a student at the Ivies is good enough to get into the NFL or NHL, but they've got to spend time being a student as well.

        Having gone to an Ivy League school, I can tell you that they still give athletic scholarships to skilled student athletes (with skilled modifying latter noun!). They just call them "academic" scholarships.

        Wink, wink.

        Sports are big money, even for the Ivy Leagues.

  • At some point anyone with a half functioning brain quickly realizes they are total idiots who know nothing.

    Those with fully functional brains should avoid bathrooms, strip clubs and always check the back seats before driving off.

  • by itzly (3699663) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @01:08AM (#47321849)
    The word 'genius' should be reserved for a rare occasion where a person shows extraordinary insight and brilliance, not the smartest person of a random group of 50.
  • by Opportunist (166417) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @01:11AM (#47321869)

    Before someone asks, yes, I am "Mensa material". I do IQ tests as a pastime. It's fun to watch shrinks stare in awe. So I could join them. As could, I'm certain, most people around here. Being in the 2% bracket isn't THAT difficult when you look at it. There are actually clubs out there with far tighter joining criteria. Also not really something I'd consider joining.

    I mean, let's be honest, why should I? Yes, it's fun to have a discussion with people who can think beyond next breakfast but it's no fun having them with people who consider themselves so "smart" and aloof to join a club that selects its members by intelligence. I mean, imagine you're good looking, would you want to join a club that only lets beautiful people join? Ponder what kind of self absorbed, shallow cunts such criteria attract. And then ponder whether you want to be part of that.

    And even more, ponder whether you want to spend at least part of your life with someone like that. And now let's imagine the worst case, just think that kids would be the results of such a union. What kind of person do you think such a child would become? Either you'll have a completely broken person who snapped under the pressure of being the expected "pinnacle of intelligence", or you get the ultimate self-absorbed asshole, or a combination of both.

    • by retech (1228598)
      Since there's a high probability they'll have a dullard as well that would be the funniest case scenario. Then those two could go at each other blaming and shaming since that average child could never be theirs.
    • by Krishnoid (984597) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @01:44AM (#47322021) Journal

      I mean, imagine you're good looking, would you want to join a club that only lets beautiful people join?

      That's the kind of question only a nerd would ask. Seriously, did you even attend high school?

    • Yes, it's fun to have a discussion with people who can think beyond next breakfast but it's no fun having them with people who consider themselves so "smart" and aloof to join a club that selects its members by intelligence.

      So, I joined up when I started a business because it was the most economical professional organization that had travel discount deals with big rental companies. And I knew where my SAT scores were so it was easy.

      I've only been to a couple meetups, but the people weren't as you suppose

    • There's some thought that assortative mating of 'geeks' is one cause [nature.com] of the rise in autism rates. High IQs tend to correlate with a better than average ability for pattern matching and focus. Combine two people with those abilities and maybe you get kids who are laser focused on patterns all the time.

      It's an interesting theory (I'm the father of an autistic son so I do a lot of reading on the subject) but there's not much more than circumstantial evidence behind it. But probably as much as evidence as "the

      • by ultranova (717540)

        High IQs tend to correlate with a better than average ability for pattern matching and focus.

        It's almost like the IQ tests tested these very things.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 26, 2014 @01:12AM (#47321873)

    I used to be in Mensa back in the 80s. When people found out I was in Mensa, they'd frequently express some surprise because they thought Mensans were a bunch of jerks because they'd met somebody who said he was in Mensa and who was very obnoxious, making himself out to be superior. I was surprised because most of the people I met in Mensa weren't like that. I remember throwing a party and invited people from my job and friends from Mensa, and the people from work commented later about how the Mensans at the party were down to earth regular folks and not at all like what they'd expected. I suspect that the jerks giving Mensa a bad rep don't actually go to Mensa events because what they want to do is brag and try to impress people but they can't do that if everybody else is a Mensan. But these same jerks are the ones making the most noise everywhere else and getting noticed. I will admit there are probably more nerdy, asperger's syndrome types in Mensa than the general population, but it's not that bad.

    You know what was an exaggerated but based somewhat on truth depiction of Mensa? The one done in a Simpson's episode with Stephen Hawking as guest voice at the end.

  • When I was eight, I thought that Mensa must be the coolest thing in the world - a Club for Geniuses! When I got a bit older, I ended up going to a few meetings (I had had a school administered IQ test done when I was skipping a grade and that was good enough for the local chapter). Between the painfully shy, the weirdos and the snobs, even my 12 year old self figured out this wasn't the club for me.

    I had hopes that maybe it was just the local chapter that was nuts but every time I hear anything about Mensa,

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Your experience parallels mine. My biggest problem with them was that nearly all of them were Republicans. They had theirs, but they didn't want to help anyone else. Their lack of compassion for people not as smart as themselves was stunning.

      • by brianerst (549609) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @02:19AM (#47322151) Homepage

        If I had to guess, I'd say nearly all the Mensans I've ever bumped into have been liberal Democrats. The idea that "the sheeple" need to be lead by smart people who will make the best decisions for them is sort of endemic to that side of the aisle. Not that Republicans are anything to write home about, but the idea of "rule by smart people" is not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the GOP...

        The Democrats tend to draw the wonkiest of the wonks and the elite professional class into their orbit. Identify a problem (or "problem") in society and bring together a small group of experts who will make the best decision for each of the 330 million people living in the US is the operating assumption for them. The Mensans I've run into fit into that mindset pretty well.

        It's only when you accept your own limitations and appreciate the different gifts that everybody has that you realize that no group of people, no matter how intelligent and well meaning, can possibly understand, let alone fulfill, the competing needs and desires of our diverse human family. Lay down some broadly accepted rules and provide a focused and best-in-class set of services, but otherwise, get out of the way.

        • by ultranova (717540)

          Not that Republicans are anything to write home about, but the idea of "rule by smart people" is not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the GOP...

          Republicans are all about rule by a smart elite. It's just that the word "smart" has become a tribal identifier for Liberals, so Conservatives prefer to use the euphemism "common sense".

          I don't think it's possible to go to politics without either thinking your know what's best or being hopelessly corrupt.

          It's only when you accept your own limita

  • Two Geniuses... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by QuadEddie (459328)
    When two geniuses mate, the result is often an autistic child: http://archive.wired.com/wired... [wired.com]
  • I don't know about the US, but in the Netherlands there are dating sites that cater specifically to the "highly educated", i.e. people with university degrees. I understand the idea behind them: you're more likely to have something in common with someone who's roughly in the same ball park as you when it comes to intelligence. This is simply that idea taken one step further. It takes a special kind of person to join mensa (but intellectually and character-wise), and so people that do are likely to have more

  • by stewsters (1406737) on Thursday June 26, 2014 @08:08AM (#47323235)
    People who boast about their I.Q. are losers. - Stephen Hawking

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