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Science Technology

Making Graphene Work For Real-World Devices 18

Posted by Soulskill
from the more-better-faster-lighter-cheaper dept.
aarondubrow writes: "Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the carbon material graphite, is strong, light, nearly transparent and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat, but a number of practical challenges must be overcome before it can emerge as a replacement for silicon in electronics or energy devices. One particular challenge concerns the question of how graphene diffuses heat, in the form of phonons. Thermal conductivity is critical in electronics, especially as components shrink to the nanoscale. Using the Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, Professor Li Shi simulated how phonons (heat-carrying vibrations in solids) scatter as a function of the thickness of the graphene layers. He also investigated how graphene interacts with substrate materials and how phonon scattering can be controlled. The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Applied Physical Letters and Energy and Environmental Science."
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Making Graphene Work For Real-World Devices

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  • but a number of practical challenges must be overcome before it can emerge as a replacement for silicon in electronics or energy devices.

    Elon Musk will fix that before he's had his breakfast.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    using stacked layers of grephene we can produce a novel writing instrument that can work in space!
    the best part - with current technologies, industrial scale production is already within reach.
    this is the graphene revolution we've been waiting for!

  • The problem many nanotechnologists have (and I'm one of them) is that they believe if they can only show the right lab measurement, then the rest of the world will come calling and "they" will solve the commercialization problems related to their technology.

    The real truth is that no number of studies like this will get graphene any closer to "real world devices." No one is going to solve the fundamental problems of manufacturing process development and material reproducibility for us. Neat lab tricks on

  • Graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the carbon material graphite, is strong, light, nearly transparent and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat

    Wouldn't those two be attributes of a one-atom-thick form of anything?

    I mean, you say it's light, but so is anything if you have little enough of it. Atom-for-atom it weighs the same as diamond.

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