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Medicine

Closing Surgical Incisions With a Paintbrush and Nanoparticles 56

Posted by timothy
from the when-superglue-just-feels-cheap dept.
New submitter BiancaM (3582365) writes "A group of chemists has shown the power of nanoparticles for closing and healing surgical wounds. Using no more than a paintbrush they are able to close surgical openings as well as classical techniques such as sutures. However in fragile deep tissues such as liver even more remarkable results were found- normally fatal damage to internal organs is repaired in seconds using a nanoparticle glue. The results show that closing after surgery can be faster and simpler using nanomaterials to glue wounds shut." For something between the above linked abstract and the research paper, there's this write-up at PhysOrg, and a video of the technique in action.
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Closing Surgical Incisions With a Paintbrush and Nanoparticles

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  • Re:Superglue (Score:5, Informative)

    by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Sunday April 20, 2014 @03:54AM (#46798367)

    Regular superglue is slightly toxic - or rather the breakdown products are. But only slightly. I've used it to patch up minor wounds a couple of times.

  • Re:Superglue (Score:5, Informative)

    by queazocotal (915608) on Sunday April 20, 2014 @04:05AM (#46798393)

    Regular superglue (neglecting that it's actually dermabobond) forms a healed wound with several layers.
    You get the two sides of the wound somewhat reacting and generating an abnormal layer, and you have bits of plastic in the wound.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com... [wiley.com] (image)

    The technique mentioned essentially makes the cut surfaces into glue, with a non-toxic additive.
    There will not be a scar due to reaction between the glue and the flesh - because there is no glue in that sense.
    The scar tissue will be very limited - as the flesh is clamped together along the whole length of the cut, without anything in between it.

  • Re:Superglue (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 20, 2014 @09:17AM (#46799003)

    Regular superglue is slightly toxic - or rather the breakdown products are. But only slightly. I've used it to patch up minor wounds a couple of times.

    Cyanoacrylates [wikipedia.org] include methyl 2-cyanoacrylate, ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate (commonly sold under trade names such as "Super Glue" and "Krazy Glue"), n-butyl cyanoacrylate and 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (used in medical, veterinary and first aid applications). Octyl cyanoacrylate was developed to address toxicity concerns and to reduce skin irritation and allergic response. Cyanoacrylate adhesives are sometimes known generically as instant glues or superglues (although "Super Glue" is a trade name).

    The generic term "superglue" is used even in clinical medicine: it is not far from the truth and is something the "average joe" can understand. The only real difference is in the hydrolysis of the ester, methyl 2- will break down to methanol versus octanol. Both are toxic, but both are also tolerable in low-grade doses. In addition, dermabond [dermabond.com] is only approved for use on the surface of the skin, not internally.

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