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Creationists Demand Equal Airtime With 'Cosmos' 667

Posted by timothy
from the 13-or-so-billion-years-then? dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Travis Gettys reports that creationist Danny Falkner appeared Thursday on "The Janet Mefford Show" to complain that the Fox television series and its host, Neil deGrasse Tyson, had marginalized those with dissenting views on accepted scientific truths. "I don't recall seeing any interviews with people – that may yet come – but it's based upon the narration from the host and then various types of little video clips of various things, cartoons and things like that," said Falkner of Answers In Genesis who also complained that Tyson showed life arose from simple organic compounds without mentioning that some believe that's not possible. "I was struck in the first episode where he talked about science and how, you know, all ideas are discussed, you know, everything is up for discussion – it's all on the table – and I thought to myself, 'No, consideration of special creation is definitely not open for discussion, it would seem." To be fair, there aren't a ton of shows on TV specifically about creationism says William Hamby. "However, there are entire networks devoted to Christianity, and legions of preachers with all the airtime they need to denounce evolution. Oh, and there was that major movie from a few years back. And there's a giant tax-payer subsidized theme park in Kentucky. And the movie about Noah. And entire catalogs of creationist movies and textbooks you can own for the low low price of $13.92.""
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Creationists Demand Equal Airtime With 'Cosmos'

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  • I demand pigs! (Score:-1, Interesting)

    by For a Free Internet (1594621) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @09:09AM (#46550581)

    tasty large hogs!

  • just wait... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by itsme1234 (199680) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @09:12AM (#46550591)

    Neil deGrasse Tyson seems to follow Sagan's old show and lines of reasoning. This means the worst is yet to come for "special creationists".

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 22, 2014 @09:46AM (#46550731)

    He should allow other scientists to present the other half of the data he consistently omits. Until then, he's only a deceiver looking to make converts to his personal religion: "And I said unto them, Whosoever hath any gold, let them break it off. So they gave it me: then I cast it into the fire, and there came out this calf" (Exodus 32:24.) No one believed Aaron when he said that, and no one believes Tyson when he says the same thing about the "Cosmos."

  • by oscrivellodds (1124383) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @10:07AM (#46550869)

    Some time in the last 40 years things changed in the US. When I was in high school in the mid 70s, if you were a dope they told you so, often in front of the rest of the class. Tests were handed out in order from highest to lowest scores so everyone knew who did best and worst. Back then it was understood that some people will never be smart and it was OK because the world needs ditch diggers, too. Kids were often flunked and held back in school when they didn't master the basics. Somewhere in that 40 year period people decided that that was a bad practice. Belief was raised to equal importance with knowledge, or I should say the meaning of knowledge was lost and confused with the meaning of belief, at least among school administrators. Now everyone's opinions have to be respected, even when they are obviously wrong. All critical thinking is gone because it is "discriminatory", as if discriminating between good ideas and bad ideas is a bad thing.

    I find it an interesting coincidence that right wing politics and religion have partnered during the same period. A lack of critical thinking is exactly what those groups need most to maintain control of the people who follow them.

  • Re:just wait... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @10:11AM (#46550897)

    I found the ending story of episode one, about how Sagan inspired him, rather depressing. It couldn't happen today, certainly not in the UK - we're a country paranoid about pedophiles to the point that no teacher dares so much as look at any under-eighteen student. It's just too dangerous.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 22, 2014 @10:44AM (#46551125)

    I agree; we have to avoid this deep indoctrination of children without choice; every christian church gathering as should share time equally between their own brand of Christianity, Kibology, Eventualism and the Pastafarians. Other religions such as Hinduism, Islam and The Cult of the Earth Godess should be added as and when representatives are available.

  • by OFnow (1098151) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @12:46PM (#46551967)

    Particularly laughable. In the bible slavery, polygamy, genocide are all fine.

    Ask True Believers about this, and they reply with variations on "Oh, that part of the bible does not count." Really.

  • by number6x (626555) on Saturday March 22, 2014 @01:22PM (#46552239)

    I'd rather have equal taxation for churches.

    @plover...

    In the Bible, Christ preaches that his followers should pay their taxes. You know 'Render unto Rome what is Rome's...". I believe that fundamentalist christian churches should volutarily be paying taxes, even if the law does not require it.

    After all the bible tells them to do it!

  • 1/3 of American Christians do think the bible should be taken literally, according to various polls. 56% think the bible should "have a greater role in society", yet - 57% didn't read the bible at all the year the poll was taken. 75% of people in the USA think the bible is the word of god, or inspired by god.

    If you accept the Bible to be the "word of god", and most Americans do, then you are NOT taking it metaphorically. But, on the other hand most Americans haven't actually read the whole bible and only hear the "good" parts in church, as selected by their pastor. The evidence is overwhelming that most USA christians have a simple, literal, or almost literal, belief in the bible. They are not taking it metaphorically.

    Once you decide that the bible should be taken "metaphorically" how does one decide what it really means? How does one decide which parts should be ignored? How does one decide which parts are good? It appears that most theologians are using rational, post enlightenment ideals, to cherry pick the good parts from the bible, and explaining away the parts that are evil, or contradicted by science as metaphor. Once you start down this path you are pretty close not needing the bible at all for your moral outlook, and discarding the iron age myths in favour of modern secular morals will seem a sensible step.

Philogyny recapitulates erogeny; erogeny recapitulates philogyny.

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