Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Mars Space

Indian Mars Probe Successfully Enters Sun-Centric Orbit 132

Posted by timothy
from the difficult-task dept.
New submitter palemantle writes with this excerpt from The Hindu, updating our earlier mention of the successful launch of India's Mars-bound probe: "In a remarkably successful execution of a complex manoeuvre, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) fired the propulsion system on board the spacecraft for a prolonged duration of 23 minutes from 0049 hours on Sunday. In space parlance, the manoeuvre is called Trans-Mars Injection (TMI). ISRO called it 'the mother of all slingshots.' Celebrations broke out at the control centre of the ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Bangalore from where the spacecraft specialists gave commands for the orbiter's 440 Newton engine to begin firing. The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), also known as Mangalyaan, is designed to demonstrate the technological capability to reach Mars orbit. But the $72m (£45m) probe will also carry out experiments, including a search for methane gas in the planet's atmosphere."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Indian Mars Probe Successfully Enters Sun-Centric Orbit

Comments Filter:
  • Our chief engineer is trying to deploy a make shift solar sail.
  • 3.. 2.. 1.. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by SB9876 (723368) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @02:32AM (#45566173)

    Countdown to a flood of unfunny, racist Indian call center jokes...

    • I'm sorry, I should have posted my unfunny racist post under yours, but I just got too cought up in the unfunny H1B jokes.

      Like all the qualified citizens here that get pushed out of jobs by H1Bs - it never happens, you know.

      In this great country, we just don't have enough "smart people" because we are all MORONS that want a living wage and benefits

      It's such a shame we will not work for basic wages with no benefits,WHO DO THE FUCK DO WE THINK WE ARE.

      Blaw, blaw, blaw....

    • I propose the following be applied to posts predicting racist posts:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatulence_humor#Assigning_of_blame [wikipedia.org]

      Incidentally, this was a new one for me: "Whoever thunk it stunk it."

    • Re:3.. 2.. 1.. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by PopeRatzo (965947) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @08:04AM (#45567111) Homepage Journal

      I'm not sure why someone who sends out a printed invitation for racist jokes would get modded "Insightful".

      I didn't see any such jokes until you mentioned them, and then the ones that came were pretty half-hearted.

      Maybe you need to have a little more faith in people.

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        I didn't see any such jokes until you mentioned them, and then the ones that came were pretty half-hearted.

        Well, I didn't see any ${BADTHING}s until you mentioned them, so they must be your fault.

        • Well, I didn't see any ${BADTHING}s ...

          Ah yes, pseudocode. You can't argue with that!

          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            Ah yes, pseudocode. You can't argue with that!

            I won't apologize for knowing my audience any more than you will, so stop taking the... er...

  • We shall not just send probes, we shall send many many QUALIFIED people to satisfy all the IT needs on the Sun.

  • by FSWKU (551325) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @02:37AM (#45566213)
    Seriously, my humble congrats to the team on their success so far. We need more players in the space game, and knowledge gained will hopefully benefit everyone.

    On a more philosophical note, I'd love to see this benefit India as a whole by pointing out to everyone just how insignificant we ALL are in the grand scheme of the universe. While they've "officially" abolished the caste system, it's still there in a lot of ways. The more people realize that Earth is but a tiny speck, the more people will (hopefully...I can dream, right?) begin to treat each other better, especially those deemed to be in a "lower class" by some arbitrary rules that nobody alive has any connection to anymore. Actually, it would be nice if we could all work toward that, not just Indian society.
    • Re:Good For Them (Score:4, Insightful)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @02:50AM (#45566271) Journal
      This is in now way India-specific; but "I'd better shore up my battered sense of importance by getting my foot on the other guy's neck" seems to be the response that crops up to the sensation of vast, cosmic, insignificance as often as some nobler sense of kinship with your fellow gravity-well-dwellers.

      I don't exactly like the fact; but when being better in some absolute sense isn't an option, we frequently turn to finding somebody to be worse, as though that's a substitute.
  • While I congratulate them on the outstanding technical achievement of this and other feats of their space program, it is a country where any and all available funds need to be going towards resolving the massive poverity, corruption and inequality issues. Over half of the nation's population is poor, 21% of their diseases are water-related,and only 33% even have access to what would be considered normal sanitation facilities. Charities exist by the dozens to deal with a variety of issues in India in tryin

    • by ThatsMyNick (2004126) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @02:55AM (#45566289)

      Well 73 million is 0.025% of their yearly budget (73m/280b). Spending the renaming 99.975% of the budget will have more appropriately will have more of effect on corruption, poverty, and inequality issues in my opinion. If help improve research and help improve research and manufacturing technology, it would probably more than pay for itself. It would also probably bring more business to Antrix (commercial wing of ISRO), and probably even make money for the Indian govt, and end up with a net gain rather than 72 million expense.

      • by idji (984038) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @07:57AM (#45567069)
        This project cost 70M$. that is 5.8c per Indian.
        If this rocket inspires 20-50 million Indian poor children to study harder at school, learn Math and be an Engineer, then this project has a FANTASTIC value for the country of India.
        I suspect this is money extremely well spent to inspire masses of children to take destiny in their own hands and rid themselves and their family of the poverty trap, by believing that an ordinary Indian child can do something extraordinary in the village, town, city, state and planet
        I just ran 3 IT seminars in 3 Australian cities - all three had 50% participants from India - why, because Indians aspire to Math, Engineering, and Australians aspire to be sport heroes, lawyers and slackers, while their government wins an election on "Turn back the refugee boats" and "Kill the Carbon Tax". Where are their inspiring projects?
    • by fredprado (2569351) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @02:58AM (#45566303)
      If all countries wait to end poverty, corruption and inequality "issues", before researching space or anything else, it won't ever be done. India does a LOT of things wrongly, but in this it is on the right track, unlike US, which keep cutting funds from NASA in name of trying to fix social problems that strangely keep getting worse and worse the more money the government apply on them.
      • US, which keep cutting funds from NASA in name of trying to fix social problems that strangely keep getting worse and worse the more money the government apply on them.

        The US has been *reducing* the amount spent on "trying to fix social problems" (or anything that primarily benefits everyday citizens, for that matter) for at least 3 decades now, not increasing it!

        Our problems have worsened for a wide variety of reasons, but as a quick starting point: job outsourcing leaving countless Americans unemployed, waves of underpaid H1B workers & legal/illegal immigrants compounding the problem, and bulk retailers like WalMart (which severely underpay employees) replaced the

      • Similarly, the USA could divert money form its space (or defence) budget to "fix" Detroit and all the other poverty-stricken, bankrupt, towns in the country.
        • And in the end the money would disappear, Detroit wouldn't be fixed, poor people would be poorer, and the space research would stop. Seems like a great idea.
    • There are 1.24 billion people in India. If you give them each 1 US dollar you would feed them for maybe 7 days. And yet you could go to Mars 16 times for the same price. You tell me how that's irresponsible.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      While I congratulate them on the outstanding technical achievement of this and other feats of their space program, it is a country where any and all available funds need to be going towards resolving the massive poverity, corruption and inequality issues. Over half of the nation's population is poor, 21% of their diseases are water-related,and only 33% even have access to what would be considered normal sanitation facilities. Charities exist by the dozens to deal with a variety of issues in India in trying to clean up these problems, and here is their government spending millions on space missions. To me, that just seems grossly irresponsible. :/

      When a similar question was asked to a professor at ISRO after a successful launch. He said, during diwali we spend 5000 crores on fireworks/rockets which reach only 10 feet high. We are spending 500 crores for MOM (Mars Orbiter Mission) in comparison.

      IMHO, money can always be better spent elsewhere.

    • by AHuxley (892839) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @04:44AM (#45566651) Homepage Journal
      India asked itself the about the payback of advanced technologies in the late 1940's to 1960's.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Space_Research_Organisation#Goals_and_objectives [wikipedia.org]
      Seems they got the funding mix right and can now enjoy the long term tech exports and get to add to space science :)
    • It's all about future investments. If they can demonstrate that they, alone, can pull this off, it will increase their technical prestige in the worlds eye. People will feel more confident investing in their technologies, people will come knocking on their door to have India launch vehicles for them, all of which will generate big revenue. It will encourage the youth to pursue sciences and technology as vocations as NASA did in the 60's, which in the years to come will boost their capabilities further. The
    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Spending more money on the problem won't solve the problem, as long as those in charge don't want to solve it.

      It would be fucking easy to fix basically anywhere. All you have to do is enable this: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/stories/indian-man-single-handedly-plants-a-1360-acre-forest [mnn.com]

      Instead of this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_issues_in_India#Pollution [wikipedia.org]

      But look around you at the country of your choice. Here in the USA we have people actively preventing people growing

    • by rubycodez (864176)

      you are confused. the people must produce the means to feed themselves, not be handed money taken from others. investing in technology is one way to accomplish that end.

  • India is like another planet. I had the opportunity to live in India in 1996-1997 and work heavily with Indians. They are such a pleasure to work with (I was working in agriculture) and things go by so softly over there (in Chennai - Manapakkam - at least). I remember thinking that, it felt how I assume it felt in America back in the 40's. I hope that India is able to weave itself into a respectable position with other first-world countries, even if only for the first-world country's sake - for the sake
  • An Indian Odyssey (Score:5, Interesting)

    by varshar (83695) on Sunday December 01, 2013 @03:32AM (#45566437)

    Excellent work by our scientists and engineers at ISRO.

    Mangalyaan is thus far proving:

    1. How reliable PSLV series is for commercial space-launch.

    2. How far India has come in mastery over orbital mechanics - witness the precise application of Oberth effect. This isn't just your granddads Hohmann slingshot. At least not yet.

    3. Setting benchmark pricing for Mars transit at USD 70 Mn. for 485 Kg payload viz. 144K USD per Kg.

    4. Generating huge impact among school kids. Visits to Nehru planetarium are no longer about US this and Russia that... even though we owe them for being pioneers.

    I look forward to the next logical extension viz. manned-mission with the Indian flag atop Olympus Mons.

    Varun

  • When I think of the Sun and science, I can't help but think of the James Bond movie Moonraker where the opposing teams of astronauts / space marines are killing each other in Earth orbit with space lasers, one guy gets hit, and he starts to fall into the Sun.
    • by Ol Olsoc (1175323)

      When I think of the Sun and science, I can't help but think of the James Bond movie Moonraker where the opposing teams of astronauts / space marines are killing each other in Earth orbit with space lasers, one guy gets hit, and he starts to fall into the Sun.

      Our first war in orbit will be the last one for a long time. Of course it will be the end of most everything in orbit. There was a reason the US only tested 1 sat killer, and there was an uproar when the Chinese did that a few years ago. Space junk. The massive amounts of debris will prevent most space travel until most of it de-orbits.

  • to India, and to ISRO. Excellent engineering. I am genuinely glad for them to have succeeded here. The more countries master this, the better it is for the exploration of space, for technology, and maybe even for peace: engineers employed at carrying out TMI are not working on, say, ICMBs and their ballistics. Goes true also for China, Russia, the US.
  • Is it just me, or does anyone else need a screen shot of the path in a Kerbal Space simulation?
    They I hear the term "slingshot" (from TFS), I imagine a multi-pass loop around earth making a gravitational slingshot out part Earth's sphere of influence.

  • A parallel /. article is 'Millionaire Plans Mission To Mars In 2018'. It is very sad to see such extremities; each of the 1.237 billion (1.237E9 or 1.237E12 depending on your persuasion but either way many more than this now) Indians lobs in an average of 5.8c whilst one millionaire (ie one person) can attempt a similar sort of Mars expedition.

Nothing is more admirable than the fortitude with which millionaires tolerate the disadvantages of their wealth. -- Nero Wolfe

Working...