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Final Mars One Numbers Are In, Over 200,000 People Applied

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  • by ackthpt (218170) on Monday September 09, 2013 @02:56PM (#44800987) Homepage Journal

    But there's no beer on Mars.

    • by BasilBrush (643681) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:00PM (#44801037)

      But plenty of nougat, caramel and chocolate.

      • Re: (Score:2, Redundant)

        by tom17 (659054)

        And Wensleydale cheese.

        Or.. wait a sec, did I sign up for the wrong interplanetary settlement mission? CRAP!!!

    • I'm pretty sure this is being styled as a BYOB party.

    • by rwise2112 (648849)
      I think you're wrong [newbelgium.com].
    • by TWiTfan (2887093) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:23PM (#44801367)

      Well, at least the hard part is over now. Now all we have to do is build a rocket and living quarters to get there and stay.

      • Well, at least the hard part is over now. Now all we have to do is build a rocket and living quarters to get there and stay.

        I agree. Once we've proved you can safely get to mars colony, it's all downhill from there. Just FYI: Don't be on the second ship out. We already know what fate the B Ark ship will serve...

        ...and I wouldn't wish that on some poor unsuspecting planet. Our ultimate answer might not be correct, but the cycle of iteration must end with us!

      • by rwv (1636355)
        TFS shoud say "wanting to be amongst the first human to die on Mars" instead of "the first human settlers on Mars" because they are going to have significant problems with having enough food, Martian storms, and maintaining livable temperatures (though, I'll give them the benefit of doubt that breathable air and water are problems that have largely been solved by research on the International Space Station).
    • by fritsd (924429)
      yet.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neoUi4poCXI [youtube.com] (WARNING: advertisement)
    • by DarkOx (621550)

      There is no beer now, but you gota look at it this way. What is the first thing any respectable settlers have done throughout history? They figure out how to make beer, wine, or some other spirit from the available food stuffs and materials; that's what. There are good odds that if any of the get to Mars at all one of these applicants will be the first Martian Brewmeister.

    • by msk (6205)

      Mars needs IPAs.

  • by bitt3n (941736) on Monday September 09, 2013 @02:56PM (#44800989)
    all of them are mothers-in-law.
  • Salaried? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kaka.mala.vachva (1164605) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:03PM (#44801087)
    Will these people get paid for the seven years they train? I'm in a pessimistic mood today, so I'm assuming that they will not actually reach Mars - just wondering what they will get for the seven years they put in.
  • by ModernGeek (601932) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:06PM (#44801135) Homepage
    I believe the application fee was $35, so they have already raised a whopping $7 million that I assume will be leveraged for more publicity stunts in raising further money for the mission.

    The main speciality of the Mars One project is fundraising and public relations, not space travel.
    • by hedwards (940851) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:47PM (#44801705)

      I doubt they turned a profit on that. $35 probably barely covered the cost of reviewing the application.

      • by Overzeetop (214511) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:49PM (#44801733) Journal

        Wait...you think they actually reviewed the applications? They're likely scanned into a database for "future use".

        I'm just jealous I didn't think of a stunt like this.

        • by hedwards (940851)

          Yes, because at this point they're still hoping to actually do this. So, somebody needed to review the applications. Sure, they might have made some profit on this, but it's not like they're getting to keep all that money. Which even if they did, the $7m or so would be a drop in the pool of funding needed to even try this.

          • That's the point. They're NOT going to even try this. The whole organization is nothing more than an attempt to extract money from suckers. That's $7Million they can bank without barely lifting a finger.

            • by hedwards (940851)

              Do you have evidence to back that up? I think it's more likely that they're going to fail because of technological reasons than not trying. Plus, the reality here is that if this is a scam, that they'll be found out when they don't actually build anything. A project with that much attention is just not a viable method of scamming people.

            • by mattack2 (1165421)

              Yeah.. and nobody can build a new successful electric car company... and nobody can build commercial space vehicles that are successful.

              • by geekpowa (916089) on Tuesday September 10, 2013 @01:45AM (#44805323)

                Nice strawman.

                Successful commercial launch systems already exist. And soon, in a few years probably, commercial man rated launch systems will exist too. No one here is refuting this.

                Mars One is an out and out scam. That is the claim. Anyone who thinks Mars One is legit needs to familiarise themselves with what a real manned space mission looks like and what is really involved, the time, cost, and expertise, of a manned space mission. I suggest start here [wikipedia.org]. And save yourself the bother of arguing that Apollo was 40 years old and with todays methods make it easier. Here are some mind boggling facts to get your head around and hopefully instil some badly needed incredulity:

                1. We have not returned to the moon or even left orbit of the planet since 1972

                2. Apollo cost $170b in todays rough figures. 30 times more expensive than Mars One

                3. Apollo at its peak employed over 400 thousand people. Mars One - today is a dozen or so and most of them are Marketing/PR types who know fuck all about problem domain they are working in

                4. Apollo mission profile is significantly simpler than Mars One. Although the return journey complicated the mission profile,the mission profile of Mars One incurs its own complications : extended stay in deep space and the necessity to provide life support and supplies for extended period of time

                5. Apollo delivered in about 8 years along the way they had real and incremental work outputs to show for it. Mars one have been going from about 2011 and they have no tangible outputs to show for it other than martketing/PR spin

                • They have about 100 grand or so (according to Wikipedia), which is nowhere near what they need. Even if they raised 100 times this amount, each year, for the next 10 years (based on a launch in around 2023) they'll still have less than 5% of the 6 billion dollars they're supposed to need for this. Even then, 6 billion seems pretty optimistic.

                  The advisory board has some interesting names attached to it. Even so, this smells like a boondoggle. I just don't see how they can meet their funding targets and someh

    • by ubungy (1471733)
      The application fee was variable depending on location. Some were $35 some were much lower. Also, they didn't reach the goal of half of a million applicants. This put them below their forecast funds from applications. Sorry can't find source.
    • by Kittenman (971447)

      I believe the application fee was $35, so they have already raised a whopping $7 million that I assume will be leveraged for more publicity stunts in raising further money for the mission. The main speciality of the Mars One project is fundraising and public relations, not space travel.

      Agreed. It struck me as a reality show, rather than as a serious space mission (that's a mission into serious space).

    • by notanalien_justgreen (2596219) on Monday September 09, 2013 @05:47PM (#44803039)

      I post this every time another MarsOne piece of fundraising comes up. So here goes again....

      I really wish people would stop posting MarsOne propaganda. It's a scam, pure and simple. It's been pointed out time and time again that their team is primarily artists and PR people. Just look here for yourself:

      http://www.mars-one.com/en/about-mars-one/team [mars-one.com]

      Of the 7 people listed there's: an artist, an editor, a communication specialist, a communications director, and an MD. There's only 2 people who could conceivably have any expertise on getting to Mars.

      They did an interview (AMA) on reddit and were torn apart:

      http://www.reddit.com/r/worldnews/comments/ufb42/ama_i_am_founder_of_mars_one_sending_four_people/ [reddit.com]

      They lack any coherent plan on how they're going to even test their technology, let alone actually get people to Mars. Stop looking towards entertainers to do what you know will require a massive engineering effort. These people are after free press and free money.

      STOP FEEDING THESE PEOPLE FREE PRESS!

    • The main speciality of the Mars One project is fundraising and public relations, not space travel.

      Isn't that exactly what the nerds of NASA suck at: getting enough funding? NASA only get 17 billion per year (approx.). The global media advertising business is approx. worth 500 billion $ per year (source: http://www.plunkettresearch.com/entertainment-media-publishing-market-research/industry-and-business-data [plunkettresearch.com]).

      Do you have any idea of the value of such a Mars mission in terms of advertising? It would be insane. I do not think it is unrealistic to assume you can get 10% of that global advertising money (50

  • 202586 (Score:5, Insightful)

    by plopez (54068) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:07PM (#44801147) Journal

    Lemmings.

    • by Monty845 (739787)
      Summed it up in one word. Someone offered me the chance to go to mars, hell yeah I'd go, but I'd want to know a lot more about the details of the plan then those guys are providing. There are tons of big hurdles, they can be overcome, but its not gonna be simple, or cheap. I don't think a reasonable person would put faith in the group running this to be able to overcome those hurdles. Now if SpaceX was recruiting for a mars mission, sign me up.
      • Re:202586 (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Calydor (739835) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:33PM (#44801503)

        I'm pretty sure that being picked as one of the lucky few does not suddenly rob you of the right to say you've changed your mind when you see the rocket put together by the cheap brand of duct tape. On the other hand, this publicity stunt might actually make people in power realize that there are people out there who will volunteer despite the risk, and that maybe it's worth a try after all.

        • Re:202586 (Score:5, Interesting)

          by kannibal_klown (531544) on Monday September 09, 2013 @04:11PM (#44802015)

          True, but it's a decision you'd want to make earlier-than-later.

          Deciding to at least start the program is a life-changing thing. For example, I doubt you'd be able to keep your job so that means losing your job AND your home since you couldn't afford payments past X months.

          So let's say they talk a great game and it looks like they have their "act" together. They have scientists, their mockups look sound, etc.

          A hypothetical 2 years period goes by while you're training and what-not... and you realize WOW these people do NOT know what they're doing. Their ships aren't going to be able to get 10ft off the ground let alone make it to Mars. These conditions are not going to last more than X months let alone the planned Y decades. These people have no idea what they're doing.

          So you quit... and now what. You're unemployed and homeless... and when asked about the 2 year gap on your resume you labeled a psycho for thinking that Mars One (now known as a cluster-f#@k) was actually going to happen.

          • So you quit... and now what. You're unemployed and homeless... and when asked about the 2 year gap on your resume you labeled a psycho for thinking that Mars One (now known as a cluster-f#@k) was actually going to happen.

            I assume you're just being polemic here- this sort of initiative (and the prestige of beating out over 200,000 others) is a positive, not a negative.

            Trust me.

            • Don't get me wrong... I think the venture is a big positive for humanity.

              • I'm just saying... the (great?) grandparent post said there are too many unknowns to see if they really have their act together: ship quality, planning, etc.
              • The grandparent post said "Well, so what. If you find out they don't have their act together then quit or leave... it's not like they won't let you"
              • My response to THAT was... yeh great. If you do quit or leave then you're kind of screwed because you would have given up your job a
          • by fritsd (924429)
            Exactly the same issues came up in the BBC documentary series "Castaway 2000" [wikipedia.org] on Taransay. And that was only for 1 year. It was truly fascinating television to watch.

            Granted, on Mars they'd need something more advanced than a polytunnel for their veggies...
    • by ron_ivi (607351)
      So you're suggesting they're being pushed by Disney [snopes.com]?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:08PM (#44801155)

    Here's why people apply and who applies: Some do it for the 15 minutes of fame, surely, but many others are serious about it. They know the risk, they know it's a one-way ticket, but their lives are going nowhere on this planet, they've got nothing to lose and this may be just the ticket for them to do something useful for humanity.

    Others may have a successful life already but they don't think in terms of "me" and "my" but in terms of humanity and its long-term goals over several generations.

    And even if the mission fails, one learns from mistakes and at least they've done something to improve the next mission's chances. Both categories of applicants are real heroes. Live or die.

    • Please mod up!! The title alone is worth a +5.

      Agree 100%. I can't think of the pilgrims wanting to come back to Europe.
      • by spyfrog (552673) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:50PM (#44801753) Homepage

        The difference being of course that the Mayflower settlers had a good chance of being self sustained. They didn't change planet to one totally inhospitable towards humans. They believed that they would be able to survive by simple using the same techniques as in England. This turned out to be wrong but it was more a lack off knowledge than anything else that killed them off - the place apparently supports life since people live there to this day.

        Going to Mars is a totally different ballgame. You can't support yourself on Mars, at least not from the beginning. You have to trust that provisions come from Earth. If your supplies doesn't come, you starve or die from suffixation.

        • by cjjjer (530715)
          Maybe. Maybe not.

          What if there is indigenous people on Mars (live below the surface) and welcome these travelers with open arms and help them settle under the planet's surface in exchange for interesting technology, different food and clothing material. Then the new settlers start arriving in the thousands bringing diseases and claiming Mars land as their own.

          What? it could happen...
    • by jklovanc (1603149)

      And even if the mission fails, one learns from unforeseenmistakes

      Knowing that something will fail and doing it anyway is just stupid.

      By the way they are not the Modern Mayflower. Many of the Mayflower passengers were fleeing religious persecution due to their Puritanism. The trip to Mars, which will not happen any time soon, has nothing to do with that.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        The Puritans were not 'fleeing' religious persecution. Being 'Puritans', they strongly disapproved of the increasing liberalism in Europe. They traveled to the new world so that they could enforce their views in the new colonies.

        • by jklovanc (1603149)

          According to this [telegraph.co.uk] they did flee persecution;

          In 1620, a group of English separatists, who became known as the Pilgrims, set sail for America to escape religious persecution amid the volatile religious and political climate. under James I.
          Under the 1559 Act of Uniformity, their rejection of the Church of England was declared unlawful leading many members of their East Midlands congregation to flee to Holland.
          However, concerned with losing their cultural identity, the group set out to create a new colony in North America and chartered the Mayflower, a cargo ship, for the purpose. They departed from a site near Mayflower Steps in Plymouth, Devon in September 1620.

          • by dave420 (699308)
            They were escaping the burgeoning liberal climate, not some fascist hell-hole. Just because the Telegraph parrots the clichéd line doesn't make it so :)
    • Others may have a successful life already but they don't think in terms of "me" and "my" but in terms of humanity and its long-term goals over several generations.

      While I agree with some of your statements, this one seems false. If someone was truly concerned about the long-term prospects of humanity I doubt they would conclude the best thing for them to do is die in one of the first colonies on mars. Realizing their rarity, I should thing they'd wait until a functional colony is established and only THEN

      • Re:Who is that? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by dgatwood (11270) on Monday September 09, 2013 @05:18PM (#44802739) Journal

        More to the point, they would try to influence the preparation to ensure that by the time they get there, the colony would be almost self-sustaining already. There's no reason it can't be done. Drop a bunch of large modules with breathable air and CO2 scrubbers, and verify remotely that they are all functioning before you send people. Then drop enough spare parts to scrub the air for at least a few decades, along with enough non-perishable food to last a similar period of time. Then drop enough building materials to build a huge, sealed, glass habitat to serve as a greenhouse for plants. Then drop equipment needed to build it (think "electric crane"). Then drop bags and bags of dirt. Then drop crates of seeds. Then drop enough solar panels to cover the state of Rhode Island and enough wire to hook it all up. Then remotely control all the equipment to make sure everything is working correctly. Then send the people to put it together. By that time, you've launched a dozen or more unmanned missions over the course of a decade, so you're sure of the launch vehicle and the landing craft. You've provided enough materials to create a sustainable living space, and you've provided enough materials to survive until they finish creating that space.

        • by fritsd (924429)
          Talk to this guy [kozicki.pl] about building a prototype Mars base in Poland, maybe.

          Plants don't need the full spectrum, so maybe it is possible to use solar panels that are space-rated to produce electricity, put the gardens underground protected from solar flares, and use LED lamps that don't have green to grow the plants. I've seen a picture somewhere. Aren't the Russians (IMBP) doing exactly the same thing (what did they eat on the Mars 500 [mars500.imbp.ru] experiment? IIRC it was a little bit of fresh vegetables as well as the co
    • Here's why people apply and who applies: Some do it for the 15 minutes of fame, surely, but many others are serious about it. They know the risk, they know it's a one-way ticket, but their lives are going nowhere on this planet, they've got nothing to lose and this may be just the ticket for them to do something useful for humanity.

      That has to be the funniest thing I've read all day.

  • Obligatory! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I have a hard enough time on this planet, much less going it on the next farthest rock out!

    On a serious note... as long as I had tasks and hobbies to entertain myself on the trip to Mars, I think I'd be fine. Getting along with people is the least of my problems. To me repititious boredom would appear to be the real killer. There is also that little psyche bit of knowing that you're on a one way ticket to an uninhabittable barren wasteland.

    Of course, having a sense of adventure would probably help that!

    • by phobos512 (766371)
      Hey, man, we're all on a one-way trip to somewhere, man. /said the hippie to no one in particular...
  • Futile (Score:3, Funny)

    by HyperQuantum (1032422) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:24PM (#44801375) Homepage

    So... they think they can escape the divine judgment by running away to Mars...

    Really pointless, as they will find out.

  • by StefanJ (88986) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:32PM (#44801487) Homepage Journal

    . . . to fertilize King Barsoom II's lawn and flower gardens! MARS NEEDS MULCH!

    But seriously: Initial training for the would-be colonists will consist of living for five years in trailer homes buried beneath the soil of Antarctica's "dry deserts." People who can't cope with the psychological pressure, or who are judged insufficiently entertaining by the casting group of the MARS LIVE! production company and its advertisers and charter sponsors, will be summarily kicked off of the program. (They will receive copies of the home game, which consists of a refrigerator box equipped with fake controls and a framed color print of a Mars probe landing site.)

  • by eyenot (102141)

    I only heard about this because Pee-Wee Herman shared the news of it, and of his application, some time ago. I'd like to say I hope he makes it, but then we'd be without Pee-Wee Herman here on Earth.

    I forwarded the news to Jane Wiedlin (Guitarist for The Go-Gos) who said she'd be interested in going, but I never saw anything on her FB that said she had filed the paperwork.

    I tried to get a couple of other celebs interested but so far all I know is Pee-Wee Herman put in his application. Wouldn't it be interes

  • by ArcadeMan (2766669) on Monday September 09, 2013 @03:36PM (#44801551)

    I don't want to live on this planet anymore. - Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth

  • Oh! Thought they would be all lawyers and hairstylists.
  • by GodfatherofSoul (174979) on Monday September 09, 2013 @04:06PM (#44801937)

    Build the rocket and ask who wants to actually take the trip. Lots of people are willing to indulge in a hypothetical sacrifice. BTW, I'm planning to stop eating red meat any day now.

  • I heard you still have to take off your shoes during pre-boarding.

  • Step 2: (Score:4, Interesting)

    by superdave80 (1226592) on Monday September 09, 2013 @04:12PM (#44802031)
    Convince each of these 220k people to each donate $1mil to get a spaceship built...
  • They might get more attention, and make it easier to understand their goals, if they called it Duna One [kerbalspaceprogram.com].
  • If I was 20 and single again, I'd do it. But I'm 34 and have family responsibilities, so that's impossible.

  • Alone all I need is Candy Crush and a good battery, shouldn't be a problem.
  • Don't Call Us (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Princeofcups (150855) <john@princeofcups.com> on Monday September 09, 2013 @06:04PM (#44803197) Homepage

    This is purely publicity and funding for the "Program." Let's be serious. Donating their $35 does not in any way make them eligible for anything. Everyone knows that, or they are delusional. If anyone is going to Mars, they will be chosen based a long sequence of qualifications and skills, and sending in $35 is not one of those.

  • We need to start building a REALLY BIG trebuchet...

  • When Elon Musk publicized his Hyperloop scheme he provided a fairly detailed technical presentation of how it was all going to work to justify its feasibility, and his claimed price tag of $7 billion.

    Musk's document provided a pretty good prima facie validation of the concept, although at the time a large number of /.ers piled on with criticisms without even bothering to look at the report. But by putting a specific proposal out there Musk had the guts to give serious critics the material they needed to cr

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