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Biotech Science

Scientists Recover Wooly Mammoth Blood 190

Posted by Soulskill
from the wooly-mammoth-vampires-very-excited dept.
westtxfun writes "'Russian scientists claimed Wednesday they have discovered blood in the carcass of a woolly mammoth, adding that the rare find could boost their chances of cloning the prehistoric animal.' As scientists unearthed the recent find, very dark blood flowed out from beneath the mammoth, and the muscle tissue was red. This is the best-preserved specimen found so far and they are hopeful they can recover DNA and clone a mammoth. Semyon Grigoriev, one of the researchers, said, 'The approximate age of this animal is about 10,000 years old. It has been preserved thanks to the special conditions, due to the fact that it did not defrost and then freeze again. We suppose that the mammoth fell into water or got bogged down in a swamp, could not free herself and died. Due to this fact the lower part of the body, including the lower jaw, and tongue tissue, was preserved very well. The upper torso and two legs, which were in the soil, were gnawed by prehistoric and modern predators and almost did not survive.'"
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Scientists Recover Wooly Mammoth Blood

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  • by Mystakaphoros (2664209) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @01:55PM (#43852417) Homepage
    Tiger blood is just so passe now.
  • Photo Op (Score:3, Interesting)

    by cervesaebraciator (2352888) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @01:58PM (#43852451)
    "the muscle tissue was red" I can't wait for the photo op of Putin eating a mammoth steak, cooked rare. People could at least take that more seriously than his flight with the cranes [colbertnation.com].
  • by Dahamma (304068) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @02:02PM (#43852477)

    Wooly mammoth vacuum cleaners, wooly mammoth shower heads, the possibilities for the modern stone age family are endless...

  • Hunting for science! (Score:4, Interesting)

    by drunken_boxer777 (985820) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @02:15PM (#43852625)

    There is obviously some money for the research, and a zoo would bring in enough revenue to help offset research costs, but how much do you think someone might bid to be the first person in 10,000 years to hunt and kill a woolly mammoth? $20M? $50M? That would go a long way in funding further research. Even better: to do so with stone age weapons.

    The contract could stipulate that the researchers still own the carcass, and therefore could profit from auctioning the hide or the ivory. Of course, it would be a long time after cloning until such an endeavor was even worthwhile.

    • but how much do you think someone might bid to be the first person in 10,000 years to hunt and kill a woolly mammoth? $20M? $50M?

      I don't know, let's ask GoDaddy CEO Scott Wagner what number he's writing on that cheque right now.

    • by Nrrqshrr (1879148)
      Now this would be one hell of a TV game show, hunting stone age animals with stone age weapons. I bet MTV would fund this.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @02:28PM (#43852781)

      Even better: to do so with stone age weapons.

      Stone-age mammoth hunting techniques tended to be group activities --- you needed many people with spears to wear a mammoth down from blood loss, or even drive it off a cliff. I doubt the type of folks who blow megabucks to compensate for their lacking manliness by murdering some poor big game critter from a distance would be interested in authentic re-creation of human cooperative social activities. Not that they wouldn't be interested in torturing a dying mammoth with some symbolic spear-thrusts after someone else has used modern technology to render the beast harmless and helpless.

    • There is obviously some money for the research, and a zoo would bring in enough revenue to help offset research costs, but how much do you think someone might bid to be the first person in 10,000 years to hunt and kill a woolly mammoth?

      Interesting question from this. After you clone it, is it an endangered species?

      Also, did they find a male or a female? Assuming mammoths use an XY sex signature, would it be possible to engineer a female if it was male blood by putting two X genes together? Although it might be unviable if there's genetic defects in the X. Getting two of the same exact chromosome is generally bad...

      • by tompaulco (629533)
        After you clone it, is it an endangered species?
        If you successfully clone something as complicated as a mammoth, then I think anything that we have preserved genetic material for is no longer endangered. We can make as many of them as we want.
    • Hunting? I have it on good authority that powdered woolly mammoth bones are the ultimate aphrodisiac and male virility enhancement.

    • by magarity (164372)

      how much do you think someone might bid to be the first person in 10,000 years to hunt and kill a woolly mammoth? $20M? $50M? That would go a long way in funding further research. Even better: to do so with stone age weapons.

      I can't even begin to imagine the liability waiver you'd have to sign.

    • If they advertised "be the first person to hunt a wooly Mammoth in 10,000 years" they could be sued for false advertising. It went extinct about 4000 years ago.
      • by tompaulco (629533)

        Some [discovery.com] experts hold that mammoths were hunted to extinction beginning some 10,000 years ago by the species that was to become the planet's dominant predator -- humans.

        Others argue that climate change was more to blame, leaving a species adapted for frigid climes ill-equipped to cope with a warming world.

        Al Gore theorizes that it was climate change brought about by humans.

  • Rule 34: There is porn of it, no exceptions.
    Rule 35: If no porn is found at the moment, it will be made.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Rule 34: There is porn of it, no exceptions. Rule 35: If no porn is found at the moment, it will be made.

      Were I not at work right now, I would confirm the hunch than "mammoth" has already been used in a few titles so far.

  • I bet that smelled amazing!
  • There are big profits awaiting if you manage to clone one of them. And a lot of patents to fill all in the way toward it. Is the kind of things that could improve, extend, or save the life of only the ones that kindly pays you a lot, for something cheap to produce.

  • For a woolly Mammoth to survive, in large numbers, its habitat had to have very dense forestation & vegetation, even if it was a colder climate.

    The interesting question is why did they suddenly get "flash frozen?" Anything less would result in carcass predation and decomposition.

    The only 2 answers I can give is that a sudden volcanic eruption could have occurred to blank out the sun nearly completely or there was an asteroid impact that blanked out the sky.

    Either of those conditions should be obvious f

    • by niado (1650369)

      The only 2 answers I can give is that a sudden volcanic eruption could have occurred to blank out the sun nearly completely or there was an asteroid impact that blanked out the sky.

      Either of those conditions should be obvious from sediment records.

      Well, "obvious" is a little strong but yes, these conditions should at least be detectable. There is ongoing research into the climate and ecological conditions around this time. The mainland Wooly Mammoths became extinct around 10000 BP [wikipedia.org], along with lots of other megafauna (large animals), all of which are grouped together in the "Quaternary Extinction Event" - the causes of which are currently being debated.

      The Younger Dryas [wikipedia.org] cold spell did occur shortly before the mammoths disappeared (~12800 BP). Thi

      • by cusco (717999)
        agriculture was developed in the near east and China and Central America and the Andes, and several thousand years after West Africans began cultivating bottle gourds. Just FYI.
        • by niado (1650369)
          Yes, agriculture arose in several geographically diverse locations independently. During the Paleolithic there seem to have been many "false starts" when various crops were attempted to be cultivated and then abandoned. Millet is thought to have been domesticated in China sometime around 8000 BP, while Maize and Squash were probably domesticated in the Americas close to 10000 BP. Cultivation of various cereals and legumes is thought to have developed and become widespread in the fertile crescent from 11-9,0
          • by cusco (717999)
            A really interesting thing about the bottle gourd is that the species cultivated in Africa and tropical America would ONLY grow in the tropics. The only way that it could have arrived was across the ocean, it could never have survived the trip across the tundras of Asia and North America. Thor Heyerdahl estimated its arrival in the Americas around 8,000 - 5,000 BPE, but I don't remember what he based that estimate on. Still later than maize and potato cultivation, but well within the time estimated for t
  • by Striikerr (798526) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @02:59PM (#43853131)

    The episode 'Fun on a Bun' where Bender digs up a 30,000 year old Woolly Mammoth from the ice to make sausages.. Should make for some tasty sausages!!

    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fun_on_a_Bun [wikipedia.org]
    " Meanwhile, Bender discovers that chef Elzar is there, ready to win the sausage-making challenge using pork that has been aged over 3000 years. Bender is determined to win the event, and takes a despondent Fry with him in the Planet Express ship to look for woolly mammoths frozen in a nearby glacier within Neander Valley, believing that meat aged over 30,000 years should certainly win. Bender is successful at finding a woolly mammoth, and with Fry's help, proceeds to grind the woolly mammoth into sausages."

  • Survive? (Score:5, Funny)

    by ThatsNotPudding (1045640) on Wednesday May 29, 2013 @03:05PM (#43853179)

    The upper torso and two legs, which were in the soil, were gnawed by prehistoric and modern predators and almost did not survive.

    "I do not think that word means what you think it means."

    • by GbrDead (702506)

      Additionally, I don't think that predators care about the start of historical records.

  • Looks like mammoths are able to breathe under water as well as be alive before the Christian god created the universe. Damn you Satan, quit tricking with us!
  • Wooly Mammoths, running amok, skewering people with their tusks. Can we really handle another POS low budget Syfy movie?

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