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Bigelow Aerospace Investigating Feasibility of Moon Base for NASA 140

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the tea-time-on-the-moon dept.
littlesparkvt writes in with a bit from Space Industry News about Bigelow Aerospace's plans for the moon: "NASA and Bigelow Aerospace are in the initial planning phases for a moon base. 'As part of our broader commercial space strategy, NASA signed a Space Act Agreement with Bigelow Aerospace to foster ideas about how the private sector can contribute to future human missions,' Said David Weaver NASA Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications." Bigelow will be performing the study for free too. Robert Bigelow chatted with a radio host a few weeks ago about Bigelow's long-term space plans. They include refueling depots and a commercial moon base, since NASA isn't planning to go there.
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Bigelow Aerospace Investigating Feasibility of Moon Base for NASA

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  • by maroberts (15852) on Tuesday April 23, 2013 @05:33AM (#43523113) Homepage Journal
    Space:1999 [wikipedia.org] a few decades late?
  • by Taco Cowboy (5327) on Tuesday April 23, 2013 @05:55AM (#43523183) Journal

    Unlike planet Earth, the moon does not have a lot of water to be wasted

    Sure, it got water (ice) but the amount is miniscule when compared to what we got right here on Earth

    What I need to know more is the exact definition of "feasibility" in that study

    If it means "can live on the moon for quite a while", of course, the amount of water on the moon is enough to support some people on the moon for some time

    We need to understand this --- it's like archeology --- what we do today might affect the future generations --- if we dig up the ancient grave today we might get X number of discoveries

    But if we leave that ancient grave untouched, and leave it to future generations who may have even better equipments and technologies to excavate that ancient grave, they may yield EVEN MORE INFORMATION than what we can obtain

    Same thing on the moon

    We can build moon base today, it's entirely feasible to get enough water to let some people survive there for some time

    But if we do that, we are, inevitably, going to pollute the water, and diminish the amount of the already limited amount of water on the moon

    In doing so, we might negatively affect the future of the future generations for their own moon explorations

    That is why I am interested to know how they are going to define "feasibility" in their "feasibility study"

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 23, 2013 @06:27AM (#43523267)
    How is this different from, oh I don't know, the last five decades? We use computers now to generate the "real estate brochure" artwork? And didn't Bigelow lay off half its work force a few years ago? Not exactly a ringing endorsement for the commercial value of a vacuum.
  • by mcgrew (92797) * on Tuesday April 23, 2013 @06:44AM (#43523315) Homepage Journal

    We need to understand this --- it's like archeology --- what we do today might affect the future generations --- if we dig up the ancient grave today we might get X number of discoveries But if we leave that ancient grave untouched, and leave it to future generations who may have even better equipments and technologies to excavate that ancient grave, they may yield EVEN MORE INFORMATION than what we can obtain

    Tomorrow will always have better tech than today no matter what "today" you're talking about. If you always wait for tomorrow's tech, you'll wait forever; tomorrow never comes.

  • Re:Gravity? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Urban Garlic (447282) on Tuesday April 23, 2013 @07:57AM (#43523555)

    Robert Zubrin, the "case for Mars" guy who seems to have thought a lot about months-long space journeys, believes that low-gravity bone loss can be mitigated by exercise. His data point is Shannon Lucid, who spent 179 days on the Mir space station, rigorously followed the prescribed exercise regime, and came back in significantly better physical condition than other members of her crew, who weren't as disciplined with their exercise regimes.

    Even if he's wrong, this is a problem to be solved, rather than a reason not to try.

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