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Medicine Science

Alcoholism Vaccine Makes Alcohol Intolerable To Drinkers 350

Posted by Soulskill
from the spike-the-punch-with-it dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Ariel Schwartz reports that researchers are working on an alcoholism vaccine that makes alcohol intolerable to anyone who drinks it. The vaccine builds on what happens naturally in certain people — about 20% of the Japanese, Chinese, and Korean population — with an alcohol intolerance mutation. Normally, the liver breaks down alcohol into an enzyme that's transformed into the compound acetaldehyde (responsible for that nasty hangover feeling), which in turn is degraded into another enzyme. The acetaldehyde doesn't usually have time to build up before it's broken down. But people with the alcohol intolerance mutation lack the ability to produce that second enzyme; acetaldehyde accumulates, and they feel terrible. Dr. Juan Asenjo and his colleagues have come up with a way to stop the synthesis of that second enzyme via a vaccine, mimicking the mutation that sometimes happens naturally. 'People have this mutation all over the world. It's like how some people can't drink milk,' says Asenjo. Addressing the physiological part of alcohol addiction is just one piece of the battle. Addictive tendencies could very well manifest in other ways; instead of alcohol, perhaps former addicts will move on to cigarettes. Asenjo admits as much: 'Addiction is a psychological disease, a social disease. Obviously this is only the biological part of it.'"
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Alcoholism Vaccine Makes Alcohol Intolerable To Drinkers

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:06PM (#42913779)

    Wait, no alcohol? Shot as in vaccine? Fuck that.

    • REverse this!!! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by cayenne8 (626475) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:11PM (#42913877) Homepage Journal
      Ok..talk about a GREAT $$$$ making endeavour!!

      Make another vaccine (or possibly something in pill form), that increases that second enzyme, and makes hangovers less and less painful!!

      I never knew what a hangover was till I was in my mid-30's...then BAM....

      Now, sure I can still drink quite a bit....not even getting very drunk at times, but man, I pay for it for 2+ days now at times.

      :(

      If this is what happened to me....I'd pay a TON of money to be able to regenerate that 2nd enzyme production to lower the acetaldehyde (sp?) and lower the hangover pain.

      Drinking is fun for those that can handle their booze....if you could get rid of the hangover, it would be great for those that still like to party a bit.

      • Agreed! My tolerance is what it used to be but still decent...

        That HANGOVERS though... They could kill a person

      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        PLEASE TAKE MY MONEY!

        *Throws money at screen*

        That is what they should be trying to do.

      • by roc97007 (608802)

        > Make another vaccine (or possibly something in pill form), that increases that second enzyme, and makes hangovers less and less painful!!

        Hell, just add it to the drink.

    • by firex726 (1188453)

      Yea they need to be working it in reverse, make a vaccine to prevent hangovers.
      They wouldn't even need scientific grants, the liquor industry alone would be happy to foot the bill.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by UltraZelda64 (2309504)

        A completely natural vaccine to prevent hangovers already exists. It's called water. After a long night of drinking enough booze that you know you'll end up with a hangover, go to sleep with a glass or bottle of water by your side. Most of the effects--especially the nastier ones--of a hangover are actually the effects of dehydration. You can drastically reduce its effects or even prevent having one completely by drinking enough water throughout the night. Depending on how much you drank and how dehydr

        • by firex726 (1188453) <[moc.oohay] [ta] [627xerif]> on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:44PM (#42914479)

          Just FYI a quick trip to Wiki might educate you on that. Don't assume stuff and pass it off as scientific fact.
          It's not been conclusively shown it is dehydration. It is but one of several leading theories:

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangover [wikipedia.org]

          > Hypoglycemia, dehydration, acetaldehyde intoxication, and glutamine rebound are all theorized causes of hangover symptoms.

          You can read more in the cited sources of the article.

          • Right or wrong, drinking a bunch of water before bed seems to prevent hangovers for me.
            • by Luckyo (1726890)

              This is about two things: dilution in stomach before it enters the bloodstream, slowing the absorption through stomach until it enters intestines and in blood and volume, less room in stomach for alcohol before stomach starts to tell your brain it's full and you should cut down on consumption.

              Same thing is recommended for those on diet. When you are dieting and feel hungry, don't eat. Instead, drink water until you fill your stomach. The feeling of fullness removes (most of the) desire to eat.

          • by DragonWriter (970822) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:57PM (#42914699)
            Most of the actual works I've seen (which are more reliable than wikipedia) have said that hangovers symptoms have been demonstrated to be linked to several of those factors, but that dehydration is by far the most significant overall (though others may be more significant in particular individuals, depending on individual sensitivities and other conditions.)
        • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:49PM (#42914537)

          As someone who used to have hangovers quite frequently in his younger days, I can assure you that they're more than dehydration. I drank plenty of water and fluids (both before and fact the fact) and still felt like ass the next day.

  • Scary idea (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    This is one vaccine some people would want to avoid. Imagine a winelover accidentally getting stuck with one and having their passion ruined for life.

    • by clonan (64380)

      Worst case it would be ruined for 6 months.

      • Re:Scary idea (Score:4, Interesting)

        by icebike (68054) on Friday February 15, 2013 @04:13PM (#42914929)

        Worst case it would be ruined for 6 months.

        When you read TFA, is says:

        With one dose of the vaccine, the mice’s drinking habits diminish by 50% for 30 days.

        That would suggest the effect is far shorter than 6 months, and the vaccine far less effective than most here seem to think.
        Chances are, the occasional, small. glass of wine wouldn't even affect most people.

        If the effect only lasts for 30 days, (or, giving the benefit of the doubt, 6 months), the true alcoholic would find excuses
        to miss that second shot.

        As for accidentally getting this shot, don't discount the possibility of a court order, or at the very least, a court
        ordered choice, the shot or jail. A shot with this short period of efficacy probably isn't likely to be successful
        in either combating alcoholism or preventing drinking, simply because it appears to be so short acting.

        In fact, one wonders if it really qualifies as a vaccine. One of the hallmarks of a vaccine according to wiki is: "[an agent that] stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters."

        This treatment seems merely to be an agent that suppress the production of a naturally occurring bodily enzyme, but only while the agent is present in quantity sufficient to trigger the suppression. It seems to have no lasting effect.

        • by Luckyo (1726890)

          Having a lasting effect would be highly inadvisable. This is about suppressing one of the natural defense mechanisms of the body against certain type of toxin. The goal is not to actually disable this defense mechanism permanently, but to cause significant discomfort for the period of alcoholic trying to kick his habit. It's essentially an extra psychological factor that introduces "alcohol makes me sick" illusion to help combat the psychological aspect of dependency. After that, defense mechanism should re

    • by green1 (322787)

      I seriously doubt there is a widespread problem with anyone getting any vaccines accidentally.

      • That's how I got my last tetanus vaccination, I stepped on a rusty nail and a syringe with the vaccination.
      • Re:Scary idea (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Hatta (162192) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:34PM (#42914297) Journal

        Without vigilance, there might be a widespread problem with people getting these vaccines against their will.

        • by icebike (68054)

          Without vigilance, there might be a widespread problem with people getting these vaccines against their will.

          I could easily see it being court mandated, especially upon a DWI conviction. The effect seems to be short lived (30 days for mice), so unless major improvements in longevity of the effect, it would seem to be no more permanent than a jail sentence, but a lot less costly.

    • Pretty sure most of slashdot would want to avoid the GNRH vaccine used with pigs to prevent boar taint.

  • Stocks in Irish, Scottish, and Russian companies unexpectedly soar.

  • Most people despised their first taste of alcohol but many came back for seconds. Like most things, it depends.
    • by crazyjj (2598719) *

      Does anyone really drink alcohol for the taste? Take the effect away and most drinks are a lot like drinking piss with a mediciney aftertaste.

      • Re:Doubtful (Score:4, Informative)

        by cayenne8 (626475) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:15PM (#42913935) Homepage Journal

        Does anyone really drink alcohol for the taste? Take the effect away and most drinks are a lot like drinking piss with a mediciney aftertaste.

        Actually...yes many of us like the taste.

        When I was a little kid and I had my first taste of beer, I LOVED it.

        I love the taste of fine wines...great with meals. I love a good, single malt scotch, with maybe a splash of water or a couple ice cubes (ok purists, bite me, I like it chilled a bit).

        I like mixed drinks...I like the bitter tastes of a gin and tonic with fresh lime on a hot summer afternoon, I like a real daquiri (not that fucking over fruited strawberry frozen shit)....I like a good mojito.

        Yes, many of us do enjoy alcohol's flavor in its various forms and mixed with things. The fact that it makes you feel great is definitely a plus.

        • by MightyYar (622222)

          I'm with you. I like my scotch on the rocks, and I like to eat the little scotch-flavored ice cubes when I'm done with the drink. I don't care how angry that makes scotch lovers. My wife got me these rocks to chill the drink, but that's not for me.

          And a G&T is the definitive summer drink (for me).

        • I love the taste of fine wines...great with meals. I love a good, single malt scotch, with maybe a splash of water or a couple ice cubes (ok purists, bite me, I like it chilled a bit).

          As a purist who drinks my scotch neat, I say it's more important to know how you enjoy the drink and to enjoy it as such rather than trying to conform to other people's method of enjoyment.

          Unless you're mixing Diet Coke with 18 year single malt.

        • by Firethorn (177587)

          Yes, many of us do enjoy alcohol's flavor in its various forms and mixed with things. The fact that it makes you feel great is definitely a plus.

          I'm all for allowing people to drink. I'm not some prohibitionist.

          I'm like the non-annoying vegetarians - I don't like the taste of alcohol, I don't like how it makes me feel, so I don't drink it. But I know there's lots of stuff other people like that I don't, and there's things I like that others don't.

          "To each his own". Have fun drinking. If you need a ride, call.

      • by firex726 (1188453)

        I assume they do, why else would you order the expansive brand at a bar over the cheap shit? Especially if being mixed.

        • by mrbester (200927)

          Old joke: when asked if he wanted water in his whisky, the old sot barked "Water?! Fish fuck in water!"

      • by neminem (561346)

        There is booze that I would only drink if I wanted to get drunk, but there is definitely also booze that I would drink even if it was entirely nonalcoholic. You don't buy good scotch for the booze, you buy good scotch because it's good scotch.

      • Does anyone really drink alcohol for the taste? Take the effect away and most drinks are a lot like drinking piss with a mediciney aftertaste.

        Some alcoholic drinks are delicious. I happen to really really enjoy the taste of Guinness. Lots of fruity mixed drinks are fantastic. That said, I haven't had either in a while. In related news; it's Friday!

      • by Glothar (53068)

        Dude, stop drinking the cheapest crap you can find.

        News flash: It tastes like crap.

        Good wine is very tasty. Microbrew beers (assuming you're from the US, considering you equate beer with piss) can be quite good.Tequila that you don't have to crawl on the floor to buy can be fairly smooth and good for flavoring meat. Vodka that doesn't come in a plastic bottle is more likely to have a clean, crisp flavor. I will often have wine/beer with a meal because it makes everything taste better. Of course, that requir

        • I'll just add that they could be simply uneducated on the subject, and also what tastes good is highly subjective. I mentioned I like Guinness but several of my friends can't stand it. Many people love wine, and I really tried to pick it up a few months ago and just couldn't find a bottle that I actually enjoyed (admittedly I didn't buy any that were over $50/bottle).
      • by miltonw (892065)

        ...like drinking piss with a mediciney aftertaste.

        Mmmmmm! American beer!

      • Re:Doubtful (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:51PM (#42914579)

        Does anyone really drink alcohol for the taste? Take the effect away and most drinks are a lot like drinking piss with a mediciney aftertaste.

        I'm with you, man. The worst kind of drink I can think of is a cask-aged Belgian monestary trippel served with an apple, a block of cheese, and a hunk of bread fresh out of some stupid oven. Yuck!

        Does anyone really listen to music for the sound? Take the dancing people and the lights away, and most music is just annoying noise.

        Does anyone really look at paintings for the visuals? Take the frame and the museum away, and most paintings are just blotches of pigment on canvas.

        Does anyone really read books for the stories? Take the paper and binding away, and most books are just a bunch of words in too small a font (which are getting smaller and smaller every year, by the way).

        Yeah, pretty much all of our senses and all of the "pleasurable" reactions that are brains fool us into thinking we're having are such a load of crap. Kind of makes you wonder: What's the point anyway? I mean, could this sunset even be any more orange? Pffft.

      • by sjames (1099)

        You're drinking bad hooch then. There are actually GOOD tasting drinks out there, not all of them expensive.

        It's also worth noting that tastes change as we age.

      • Does anyone really drink alcohol for the taste?

        Probably not, but few people drink straight alcohol and even fewer are around to discuss why. Many people, OTOH, drink beverages which happen to contain alcohol for the taste.

    • by quantaman (517394)

      They come to like the taste because they associate it with the feelings that come after.

      This would change the feelings that happens after drastically, I think it could be extremely effective.

      • by cayenne8 (626475)

        They come to like the taste because they associate it with the feelings that come after.

        Not necessarily. I tasted my first beer, I think at about age 12 or so, and I liked it the very first sip I had, and I had NO idea what the feelings would be...I didn't have enough to get buzzed, but I sure know I liked the taste of beer!

        I still do to this day....hell, nowdays, I brew my own!!

      • by Synerg1y (2169962)

        It would discourage the common drinker, but would it discourage the alcoholic?

    • by sdsucks (1161899)

      Disliking the taste doesn't really equate to "feeling terrible", which is what thus purportedly would do.

  • This is news? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by wierd_w (1375923) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:09PM (#42913839)

    Seriously? This is news?

    The EXACT SAME effect can be produced by feeding people shaggy mane mushrooms, (which are perfectly edible) due to the presence of a substance called Coprine.

    Coprine acts similarly to a well known medicinal substance called Disulfriram" [wikipedia.org] that has been used to treat alcoholism via this mechanism for nearly 100 years!

    So, what you are telling me is that this doctor has essentially re-invented the wheel, and that this is news?

    • Re:This is news? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:11PM (#42913875) Journal
      But, the mushroom is not patentable. But this new "drug" will be patentable.
    • Re:This is news? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by plover (150551) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:15PM (#42913931) Homepage Journal

      As a medicine, continuing treatment with ant-abuse is voluntary. As a vaccine, it's a life altering event.

      I'd be interested to see the first DUI case where a judge says "six months in the workhouse OR the vaccine."

      • by cayenne8 (626475)

        I'd be interested to see the first DUI case where a judge says "six months in the workhouse OR the vaccine."

        Well, first of all, get yourself a better lawyer...especially for first offense, you should likely get out of it with maybe probation.

        But if it came down to that...I'd take the 6 months.

        • Re:This is news? (Score:5, Interesting)

          by plover (150551) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:49PM (#42914549) Homepage Journal

          I just said I'd like to see it, not participate! I think it will make for some interesting ethics discussions.

          Imagine a drunk driver convicted of vehicular homicide being involuntarily sentenced to receive the vaccine. Is that ethical? Ask the victim's family if it's ethical to release him from prison without the vaccine?

      • by tibit (1762298)

        Sorry, but calling this vaccine is an overstatement. It's like a birth control injection. Good for a relatively short period.

    • by the_B0fh (208483)

      One lasts a couple of days. The other lasts 6 months.

      Slight difference.

    • Seriously? This is news?

      The EXACT SAME effect can be produced by feeding people shaggy mane mushrooms, (which are perfectly edible) due to the presence of a substance called Coprine.

      Coprine acts similarly to a well known medicinal substance called Disulfriram" [wikipedia.org] that has been used to treat alcoholism via this mechanism for nearly 100 years!

      So, what you are telling me is that this doctor has essentially re-invented the wheel, and that this is news?

      If you read the article you linked (I just did - having not heard of it before) the most important part of this new product is that it's a (permanent?) vaccine rather than a pill. In studies cited by that Wikipedia article, Disulfriram was not effective primarily due to poor compliance by the patient- they stopped taking the pills so they could have a drink (basically). With a vaccine, the patient does not have the ability to stop and have a drink. I think that's a significant and worthwhile improvement

    • by lbmouse (473316)

      I think the major issue with Disulfriram (as even mentioned in wikipedia) is compliance. A vaccine removes that hurdle.

  • by sokoban (142301) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:10PM (#42913853) Homepage

    It could put you at a higher risk of developing liver cancer.
    http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-info/healthyliving/alcohol/howdoesalcoholcausecancer/how-does-alcohol-cause-cancer [cancerresearchuk.org]

  • I can see this is a good option for those that really want to stop drinking. But.... drinking is a twisted cocktail of the poison alcohol and the feelings that go with it (or lack of perhaps, the numbing) that keep people drinking. So this may be the push that people trying to quit need. If the just the drinking makes you feel sick enough to not want to drink anymore, more power to them! It may not be a perfect solution for those trying to stop, but at least it is another option. I just hope the vaccine its
  • Vaccine? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Seumas (6865) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:12PM (#42913893)

    I don't think they understand what a "vaccine" is. Can we (especially the media) stop throwing that word around for everything? A vaccine immunizes you against a disease, by getting the body to produce antibodies.

    • I don't think they understand what a "vaccine" is. Can we (especially the media) stop throwing that word around for everything? A vaccine immunizes you against a disease, by getting the body to produce antibodies.

      Why stop there? Real vaccinations are only to prevent smallpox (and come from cows). You're thinking "inoculation".

  • by zifferent (656342) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:14PM (#42913913)
    If this works. Expect to see people get court-ordered to get an injection after alcohol-related offenses. The CJ will do anything and everything in their power to make the criminal's life unbearable, rob them of the self-esteem, and keep them in the system.
    • by Psyborgue (699890) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:42PM (#42914439) Homepage Journal
      Better an injection that lasts 6 months and can teach a person self control in the mean time than a sentence to a cult-like organization that convinces you that you're destined to die unless you attend their fruity little club until the end of your life. AA's success rate is no better than the spontaneous rate of remission (doing nothing at all). Yet it's worshiped as a solution because A: it's free and B: proselytization is part of the program. Popularity != quality. Fucking cancerous boil of a religion on the ass of science. Thank god for scientific solutions like this that can finally put the nail the the quackery coffin, but you can bet your ass twelve steppers and their ilk will be out in (often anonymous) force, trying to get this banned or at least lobbying against it's use.
  • The line

    which in turn is degraded into another enzyme

    Should say

    which in turn is degraded by another enzyme

    It makes no sense for a product of alcohol degradation to become an enzyme on it's own.

  • If you came up with something that would basically give you a super-hangover from alcohol, by blocking the breakdown of a chemical responsible for hangovers... it seems to reason you could also figure out how to cause faster breakdown of the same chemical. If it was really mostly responsible for hangovers, it seems like that would make billions of dollars as the first truly reliable hangover preventative. I know I'd buy it (if there weren't other worse side effects).

    Meanwhile, I can't imagine many alcoholic

  • by Psyborgue (699890) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:18PM (#42913995) Homepage Journal
    Will be 12 stepping fanatics who think that the only way to get over an addiction / bad habit is through their fucked up religion.
    • think that the only way to get over an addiction / bad habit is through their fucked up religion.

      Is there a non fucked up religion?
      Hint, read my Sig for my opinion.

  • Question, which do you see happening first:

    1) Parents paying to inject their high school kids without asking what the kids think about it.

    2) High school and college kids pranking each other by injecting their ex-'friends' with it.

    • by wierd_w (1375923) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:33PM (#42914283)

      easier to dose them with a mushroom pizza, made with shaggy mane mushrooms. Same effect, less permanent.

      Mushroom ingestion disrupts enzyme activity for up to 3 weeks.

      Hilariously, shaggy mane mushrooms frequently grow on lawns, and are easily identifiable. [wikipedia.org] There is a reasonably good chance you can find them simply growing on the campus quad, if you live in the northern hemisphere.

      Sadly, due to the nature of the mushroom, it decomposes rapidly after being picked, so only fresh mushroom could be used for this purpose. In terms of taste and texture, it is similar to crimini, though has a different appearance when sliced. Disguising the mushroom in a saute' will not adversely effect the action of the coprine (active agent present in the mushroom) and will enable one to better deliver the joke mushroom to one's peers.

  • Horrible summary (Score:5, Informative)

    by TheWingThing (686802) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:19PM (#42914015)

    This is one of the most horrible and stupidest summaries I've read in a long time. Enzymes are biochemical catalysts. Ethanol and acetaldehyde are substrates. The substrates get converted into end products with the help of enzymes and energy. Ethanol does not get converted *into* an enzyme known as acetaldehyde. Ethanol gets converted to acetaldehyde by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, through the loss of one hydrogen atom. In the next step, acetaldehyde gets converted into acetic acid (same thing as in vinegar) by the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase through the loss of another hydrogen atom. Acetaldehyde a lot more toxic than acetic acid. If you block the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase (which lacks naturally in a minority of East Asians), there will be an accumulation of excess acetaldehyde, causing very noxious symptoms. This is exactly what drugs like disulfiram ("antabuse") do. What a badly written summary. Both the submitter and the editor need to read some biochemistry or learn to use google before posting rubbish.

  • Doesn't Anabuse already do this?

  • Well, maybe that explains why I get a headache a few hours after having a few beers.
  • Won't work (Score:4, Insightful)

    by PPH (736903) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:27PM (#42914155)

    I know someone who has this alcohol intolerance. She still drinks, in spite of the rotten feeling afterwords.

    In some cases, alcoholism is about social and psychological dependence. Not the buzz from the chemistry. If people drink because they need it to fit in to a crowd, getting sick won't stop that.

    • by tom229 (1640685)
      My thoughts exactly. How are worse hangovers supposed to stop alcoholics? AFAIK, prolonged alcohol abuse already can create this enzyme breaking down problem giving alcohol abusers worse hangovers anyways.
  • by kramer2718 (598033) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:27PM (#42914161) Homepage

    There is also a genetic basis for nicotine tolerance. The mechanism is essentially the same. There is an gene that codes for an enzyme which removes nicotine from the bloodstream. This gene has several different alleles that code for more or less effective versions of the same enzyme. Individuals who have the allele that codes for the most effective enzyme are heavy smokers if they smoke. They smoke a cigarette, receive the desired stimulation, and then the enzyme clears the nicotine. Thus they desire another dose soon afterward. Individuals who produce the least effective version of the enzyme get sick when they smoke. The enzyme fails to clear the toxin in a reasonable time and they feel ill, sometimes vomiting. Individuals producing middling effective versions can be occasional smokers. Read more here [soton.ac.uk].

    If researchers can create a treatment for alcohol in this way, they can probably create a smoking treatment as well. It is unlikely, though, that the treatment would alleviate withdrawal symptoms on its own. This approach likely will lead to treatments for other addiction problems also.

    If there come sto exist effective treatments for illegal drugs, there will be serious socio-political implications. The rational for the the war on drugs will be completely destroyed. If people can choose effective treatment, then there will be no unwilling chemical dependence. This will decrease crime, health problems, and other negative effects of dangerous drugs. So there will be no basis for illegality. Will that change the politics surrounding drugs? I don't think so.

  • by meerling (1487879) on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:29PM (#42914193)
    When I was in the military, there were some guys that came to work 3 or 4 times a week (almost every week) with hangovers.
    I'm not not talking about the "I'm a little queasy, give me an asprin" kind of hangovers, but rather the "shhhh, you're breathing too loud" kind of hangovers.

    Sure, there are some people who will stop, but there are too many that won't.
    Now if it caused illness fast enough they haven't even finished their beer, then it might have an effect. Of course, those drugs already exist and are in use.
    Also, it has been proven, they don't solve alcoholism, but they do help in it's treatment.
    • by pavon (30274)

      Exactly, this treatment does nothing to address the biological factors that make alcohol addictive. Instead it just makes it even more unhealthy by eliminating our natural ability process the toxins created when alcohol is consumed. Stupid approach.

  • Except that in most cases are these addicts not just addicted to being high and they happen to choose alcohol because it is free and cheap?

    Is it not exceedingly likely that if we inoculated every drunk with this today that in a week 80% of them would be crack addicts or similarly worse off?

  • Closest thing I've been able to find thus far is this paper from 2010: Viral vectors for the treatment of alcoholism: Use of metabolic flux analysis for cell cultivation and vector production [uchile.cl]

    The article didn't make too much sense at first, as human acetaldhyde dehydrogenases are located either in the cytosol or mitochondria; vaccine-stimulated antibodies would not be expected to be able to block the enzyme's activity. A gene-therapy agent would be able to accomplish the task, however.

  • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Friday February 15, 2013 @03:53PM (#42914633) Homepage
    A product called "Budweiser" has been making tiny amounts of alcohol intolerable to drinkers for years.
  • Addictive tendencies could very well manifest in other ways; instead of alcohol, perhaps former addicts will move on to

    Suicide (or murder if this is forced upon them by the State).

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