Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Biotech Medicine

Pioneering Transplant Surgeon Joseph Murray Dead at 93 24

Posted by timothy
from the giver-of-life dept.
alphadogg writes "Dr. Joseph E. Murray, the Nobel laureate who conducted the world's first successful organ transplant, died Monday at the Boston hospital where the pioneering surgery was performed. He was 93. On Dec. 23, 1954, in Operating Room 2 of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Dr. Murray took the healthy kidney of Ronald Herrick and sutured it into the donor's dying identical twin, Richard. With that 5½-hour operation, Dr. Murray and his team saved a life, sparked an ethical debate that still echoes today, and opened medicine to a new frontier. Murray, who focused on plastic and reconstructive surgery for most of his career, was recognized with the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1990."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Pioneering Transplant Surgeon Joseph Murray Dead at 93

Comments Filter:
  • Rest in peace. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by philip.paradis (2580427) on Tuesday November 27, 2012 @09:56AM (#42105419)

    Your work, and the work and research from countless medical professionals following in your footsteps, has had an immeasurably postive impact on the lives of millions. Sir, rest in peace knowing that your leave is well earned.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 27, 2012 @10:42AM (#42105855)

    36 years ago this December my mother received a kidney transplant from my uncle.

    3 years later I was born.

    I am forever grateful to Dr. Murray and his pioneering work that saved the lives of millions and in the process allowed many others to be born.

  • by Mahldcat (1129757) on Tuesday November 27, 2012 @12:18PM (#42106717)
    News article on NPR today replayed an interview they conducted with him a few years ago. What struck me is that when asked if he felt he was making history his response was an emphatic "no." followed by "I viewed it as trying to save a life." Just as compelling is the Doctor they brought in when they replayed this interview segment, who confirmed this was how he looked at thing, with a deep sense of humility, and little to know "grandstanding".

Between infinite and short there is a big difference. -- G.H. Gonnet

Working...