Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Education Privacy Science Technology

Student Refusing RFID Badge Now Fights Expulsion Order 743

Posted by Soulskill
from the had-me-until-mark-of-the-beast dept.
BeatTheChip writes "Lawyers representing Andrea Hernandez, a science and engineering student at John Jay High School, are fighting an expulsion notice issued a week ago for refusing to wear a Smart ID badge. To represent her, lawyers filed a preliminary court injunction, seeking legal restraints on the school. She maintains stance of refusal to wear any badge containing an RFID tag for reasons of basic privacy and conflicts with her belief system. The controversial decision for her school to adopt the NFC badges is part of the Student Locator Project, tracking attendance. Local schools started issuing the lanyard badges this fall despite parental outcry at NISD school board meetings."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Student Refusing RFID Badge Now Fights Expulsion Order

Comments Filter:
  • by feepness (543479) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:19AM (#42052117) Homepage
    Wear it all day long.
    • by treeves (963993) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:22AM (#42052141) Homepage Journal

      So she can be marked as absent when she's actually in school? Great solution. Better to pursue the lawsuit.

      • by gagol (583737) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @05:11AM (#42053039)
        Why not skip school and have a friend carry her ID around... is that so hard for teachers to actually take attendance? Social problems CANNOT be solved with technology solutions... such as voting machines.
      • by mabhatter654 (561290) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @08:28AM (#42054095)

        But tey don't CLAIM to be using it for class to class attendance. Fry it, then wear it around.... Staff is probably more concerned because it IS a "security risk" to have people running around that don't belong. My local high school had an issue with a 20-something lurking around and ended up in the girls' locker room. Since then, everybody without a lanyard getsstopped and questioned by ANY faculty roaming the halls... Not just "hall monitors".

        As an IT person, I'm plain skeptical about the tracking stuff anyway. I'd be 100% certain that nobody in IT is watching this, and nobody in security is watching either. They might have a screen with the little dots moving around, they might pull reports... I doubt the accuracy of any place not staffing 2-3 full time staff on this.

        • by tompaulco (629533) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @10:24AM (#42055431) Homepage Journal
          Staff is probably more concerned because it IS a "security risk" to have people running around that don't belong. My local high school had an issue with a 20-something lurking around and ended up in the girls' locker room.
          So we have a technological solution that identifies that people who are supposed to be there either are or aren't there, but it doesn't do anything about the problem you say is the bigger problem. Obviously, this solution doesn't help until we embed a chip in EVERYBODY, and then if people who aren't supposed to be there are found, they can be intercepted. In the long run, that is probably what they are looking to do.
        • by berashith (222128) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @10:52AM (#42055791)

          I ditched with a friend in high school and went to a different school to visit his girlfriend. We were just going to sneak in and eat lunch with her. The school had over 2000 kids in it, and we made sure to arrive in between classes so there were kids walking around all over the place. We didnt even get in the front door before we got questioned. Somehow a teacher knew that we didnt go to that school.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:23AM (#42052145)

      You still carry the mark of the beast with you. Even though it would be unreadable :).

      • by gagol (583737)
        Following this idea, your driver licence is the mark of the beast. Last time I checked no christians, no matter how fundamentalist, still carry it.
    • by wvmarle (1070040) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:25AM (#42052161)

      I was thinking of a tinfoil pouch for it. No need to destroy it; just make it readable only when you allow for it to be read. Willingly destroying the chip may have other legal implications (the badge may be property of the institution) - and anyway they're likely to issue a new one when one is found faulty.

      • by akeeneye (1788292) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:39AM (#42052901) Homepage
        Yes. In Washington state, and probably others, when you get your chipped "Enhanced Driver's License", the DOL issues it along with a "tinfoil" sleeve to keep it in when you're not producing it to display to The Authorities. Aside: I've yet to find a US/Canada border crossing that can read the chips. They always swipe the EDLs through what I assume is a magcard reader. Now that could just be a charade of some sort and they're actually reading the chips, but that seems somewhat unlikely, and, well, tinfoil-hattish. When asked, one of the US interrogators said that the smaller crossings didn't get all the high-tech goodies such as the readers and had to do things the old-fashioned way.
    • by mrjb (547783) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:29AM (#42052189)
      Destroy badge, get expelled for destruction of school property.
      • by jamesh (87723) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:39AM (#42052257)

        Destroy badge, get expelled for destruction of school property.

        Almost... try "_Get caught_ destroying badge, get expelled for destruction of school property."

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Don't destroy it in a microwave: zap it! There's a video on youtube that shows how to build a RFID zapper from a disposable camera. It's all about the plausible deniability.
    • by MichaelSmith (789609) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:37AM (#42052239) Homepage Journal

      It won't open any doors then.

    • by Zemran (3101) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:53AM (#42052367) Homepage Journal

      Wouldn't it be better to just leave it in her locker and always be at school?

    • by kf6auf (719514) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:04AM (#42052427)
      Actually, the school offerred to give her one without a chip or battery. She still refused so I'm guessing she wouldn't be satisfied with the microwave trick.
      • by Fished (574624) <amphigory AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @08:49AM (#42054297)
        The school added lots of requirements to that, including that she visibly display the badge to show people that she had been brought into line, and that her parents publicly support the badge program.

        Talk about Gestapo tactics ...
    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:07AM (#42052441) Journal

      Read the letter linked from infowars:
      http://static.infowars.com/2012/11/i/general/Hernandez_RFID-ID-john_jay_letter.jpg [infowars.com]

      "In the event that you change your stance on wearing the ID with the battery and chip removed as has been offered to you on two occasions, we will be more than willing to rescind this withdrawal notice."

      That seems reasonable, except for the fact that she was also told her original pre-RFID card would be valid for all 4 years she was enrolled at the school.

      Everything aside, the zero tolerance policies that most school administrators (officially or unofficially) adopt is an injustice all its own.

      • by Spamalope (91802) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @05:46AM (#42053195)

        Read the letter linked from infowars:

        "In the event that you change your stance on wearing the ID with the battery and chip removed as has been offered to you on two occasions, we will be more than willing to rescind this withdrawal notice."

        "In response to public outcry and pressure from rights groups, the school has offered to remove the battery and chip, but wouldn’t budge on mandating the ID. Their offer would also require the Hernandez family to end their criticism and agree to comply with and even tout the policy,"

        On the condition that her and her father say the sh*t sandwich tastes great and everyone should try some. It seems you left the most important part out.

    • RTFA (Score:3, Informative)

      by jklovanc (1603149)

      She was offered a badge without an RFID chip in it. She refuses to wear a badge of any sort.

      • Re:RTFA (Score:4, Interesting)

        by TheRaven64 (641858) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:39AM (#42052607) Journal
        I think my proposal for the protest against the UK ID cards would work in this case: create a bright yellow holder for the badge in the shape of a Star of David and wear it on your arm. Get some local press to photograph you wearing it.
        • Re:RTFA (Score:4, Interesting)

          by flyingfsck (986395) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:21AM (#42052811)
          You may be onto something. A swastika badge holder would get the whole program canned in no time flat.
        • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Insightful)

          by jklovanc (1603149) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:22AM (#42052819)

          The difference is that the Nazis only forced the Jews to wear the Star of David so that they could be more easily singled out and oppressed. It is very different when everyone has to have the ID card. If you do not have a visible school ID card then you shouldn't be there. It happens every day in most secure businesses and no one complains. Why should a school be any less secure than your office?

          Her refusal is based on an interpretation of the Bible. Is she never going to carry ID? I guess she win't be driving, joining a club, getting a job or leaving the country. All of these require carrying a numbered card which she refuses to do.

          • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Insightful)

            by 1u3hr (530656) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @06:27AM (#42053415)

            If you do not have a visible school ID card then you shouldn't be there. It happens every day in most secure businesses and no one complains. Why should a school be any less secure than your office?

            You have a choice where to work and what conditions you accept in return for your salary. And this is the government doing it and withholding your education if you refuse. And what does this have to do with "security"? It's just about simplifying taking the roll call so the school can collect the per diem from the government. It's not for the students' benefit.

            The school could simply make it optional. Anyone who opted out could just sign a roll at the door or be counted absent. 99% of students would use RFID to avoid the hassle, so the overhead would be trivial.

      • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Funny)

        by JosKarith (757063) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:24AM (#42052827)
        "We don' need no steenkin' badges..."
      • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Informative)

        by silviuc (676999) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @05:39AM (#42053161) Homepage
        Wearing a badge was actually required for high-school students in my country 20 years ago when we had a communist party ruling the country. It's funny how American democracy looks more and more like the "democracy" the communist party was preaching back then.
        • USSA (Score:4, Insightful)

          by hessian (467078) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @07:55AM (#42053871) Homepage Journal

          It's funny how American democracy looks more and more like the "democracy" the communist party was preaching back then.

          I think it has to do with degrees of removal from reality.

          When there's a realistic system in place, people go along with it because it makes sense.

          When there's not a realistic system, there's usually an "ideology" used to compel people to obey.

          This drifts farther and farther away from reality and as a result, the state uses more control on its citizens.

          They in turn react passively by being less productive and more corrupt.

      • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Informative)

        by thereitis (2355426) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @06:17AM (#42053339) Journal

        "Due to her persistent refusal, the school’s administration finally offered Andrea a deal; she would comply with the project by wearing a program badge with the chip removed."

        But it's not quite that simple:

        “[A]s part of the accommodation my daughter and I would have to agree to stop criticizing the program and publicly support it. I told [the Deputy Superintendent] that was unacceptable because it would imply an endorsement of the district’s policy and my daughter and I should not have to give up our constitutional rights to speak out against a program that we feel is wrong.”

        • Re:RTFA (Score:5, Funny)

          by Fnord666 (889225) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @07:38AM (#42053781) Journal
          They could take the approach used in this joke:

          The Evil Brothers

          There were two evil brothers who were rich and used their money to hide their ways from the public eye. They even attended the same church and looked to be perfect Christians.

          Then, their pastor retired, and a new one was hired. Not only could he see right through the brothers' deception, but he also spoke well and true, and the church started to swell in numbers. A fundraising campaign was started to build a new assembly.

          All of the sudden, one of the brothers died. The surviving brother sought out the new pastor the day before the funeral and handed him a check for the amount needed to finish paying for the new building.

          "I have only one condition," he said. "At his funeral, you must say my brother was a saint." The pastor gave his word and deposited the check.

          The next day, at the funeral, the pastor did not hold back. "He was an evil man," he said. "He cheated on his wife and abused his family." He went on in this vein for a small time, and the surviving brother was clearly fuming in his seat.

          "But," the pastor concluded, "compared to his brother, he was a saint!"

  • Get homeshcooled (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Billly Gates (198444) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:22AM (#42052139) Journal

    The school has a right to watch its costs and protect their students. If not then the lawyers will go after them for not using RFID yada yada.

    For someone who works in the education system, I have to say the reason for this is money. The budgets are set on enrolled students. Not paper enrolled but physically enrolled each day. If a poor inner city school has a 20% truancy problem, then the budget is cut 20% and the teachers are fired.

    I am more upset at the lawyers who are costing teachers jobs and I doubt their parents are in it for their child. They have a free lottery ticket at someone elses expense. Perhaps if parents were not so sue happy American schools could successful compete with Asian and European counterparts.

    Schools have a right to enforce a learning environment as oppressive as some of the highschool slashdotters readers who want to say otherwise. At work you have to do what your boss says or you will be shown the door. What is so different with school. These are not implanted chips or anything and with drug dealers, pedophiles, and other problems it is not a bad idea to track where each student is.

    • by ThatsMyNick (2004126) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:27AM (#42052181)

      It is a public school. School has only the rights the public allows it to. If the people are opposed to RFID tracking of their kids, the school has just lost their right to track them.

    • by Eraesr (1629799)

      Schools have a right to enforce a learning environment as oppressive as some of the highschool slashdotters readers who want to say otherwise. At work you have to do what your boss says or you will be shown the door. What is so different with school. These are not implanted chips or anything and with drug dealers, pedophiles, and other problems it is not a bad idea to track where each student is.

      You're reasoning this the wrong way around. Is your boss tracking you with an RFID chip? Would you like it if he did? I guess not, so why would schools be allowed to do this? Also, your "but think of the children!!" reasoning is a little bollocks as well. The school should make sure drug dealers, pedophiles and "other problems" don't get onto school property. If a school feels it's necessary to track students to protect them from those kinds of problems while they're at the school grounds, then the school i

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:26AM (#42052543) Journal

      I am more upset at the lawyers who are costing teachers jobs and I doubt their parents are in it for their child. They have a free lottery ticket at someone elses expense. Perhaps if parents were not so sue happy American schools could successful compete with Asian and European counterparts.

      Lol wut?
      You seem to be ignoring important cultural factors when it comes to lawsuits.

      Asia and Europe are polar opposites when it comes to litigation.
      In Asia, almost nobody sues because they have a cultural aversion to litigation and the court systems are fucked.
      In Europe, lawsuits are less common because the public supports strong government regulatory bodies that ultimately limit the need for people to sue.

      In the good old US of A, every sues because the libertarians/conservatives think regulation is bad and civil lawsuits are the solution.
      As a bonus, those same libertarians/conservatives want tort reform because all those civil lawsuits are expensive.

      At work you have to do what your boss says or you will be shown the door. What is so different with school.

      School is not voluntary. Work is.
      Homeschooling, while good/bad, isn't an option for everyone.

    • by Genda (560240)

      Sorry, but raising a generation of children that agreeably comply to carry a tracking device, is a popcorn fart away from creating a society where our government requires each and every one of us to carry a tracking device. Imaging the up side. No Crime goes unpunished, almost instantly. Nobody ever get's lost. You can find almost anybody for a price. You can manage traffic, and human resource requirement to a person.

      Of course the government always knows where you are, what you're doing, what you're saying.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by JosKarith (757063)
      School is not about education and expanding your mind. School is about drumming in a minimum standard of literacy and numeracy so you're employable then spending the next 8 years teaching you to sit down, shut up and do what you're told.
  • Dear Andrea, (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mrjb (547783) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:25AM (#42052163)
    Thank you for fighting for our freedom. Too few people do. Best regards, mrjb
    • Re:Dear Andrea, (Score:4, Interesting)

      by JaredOfEuropa (526365) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:48AM (#42052631) Journal
      What freedom would that be, exactly? The right not to be tracked, or to go where you please without having to carry an ID? You have that right... and yet you are still required to bring your RFID card to the office, and you still need an ID to pick up a parcel at the post office.

      Schools shouldn't be allowed to track children everywhere they go. But since they are charged with the education and well-being of these kids for a certain portion of the day, is it unreasonable that they ask children (and others) to carry an RFID card while on the premises? I fail to see what principle of freedom or privacy is violated by the requirement to carry an ID card (with or without a chip) at school.
  • by s1d3track3D (1504503) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:30AM (#42052197)
    Funny, my initial reaction was, "great, a young engineering student standing up for her 1st and 4th amendment rights.", then I saw her primary reason,...

    For many Christian families, including the Hernandez’, the mandatory policy is eerily close to the predictions of Revelations 13: 16-18, which warns of the Mark of the Beast:
    16 He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads,
    17 and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or[a] the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
    18 Here is wisdom. Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666. (New King James Version)

    • by Yetihehe (971185) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:50AM (#42052343)

      Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666

      "Him who has understanding" - programmers?
      "calculate the number of the beast" - programmers.
      "for it is the number of a man" - primary key
      "His number is 666" - SELECT * FROM PEOPLE WHERE ID=666;

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:30AM (#42052563) Journal

      Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

      Yep, looks like she's standing up for her 1st amendment rights.

      The school also wanted her parents to sign an agreement stating they would publicly support the program.
      The parents refused, which sounds like they are standing up for another 1st amendment right..

      • "My religion forbids me to wear a badge, so forcing me to wear one is a prohibition of the free exercise of that religion, and a violation of my rights. I should therefore be able to attend school without a badge".
        Is that the line of reasoning here? Fine. Now replace "a badge" with "pants".
  • Privacy and belief (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tbird81 (946205) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:43AM (#42052285)

    "for reasons of basic privacy and conflicts with her belief system"

    I agree with half of her case.

    But someone's "belief system" shouldn't exempt them from following the rules and laws of the land. Otherwise pedo Mormons could marry 13 year-olds, hardcore Muslims could keep their female children out of schools, and fundie Christians could stalk those who are having abortions.

    You should oppose a rule because it is wrong for the population, not because it conflicts with your belief system.

    • by jklovanc (1603149)

      The basic privacy is moot because she was offered a card without an RFID chip.

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:50AM (#42052641) Journal

      But someone's "belief system" shouldn't exempt them from following the rules and laws of the land. Otherwise pedo Mormons could marry 13 year-olds, hardcore Muslims could keep their female children out of schools, and fundie Christians could stalk those who are having abortions.

      Your first statement is flat out wrong and your second is a fallacious slippery slope argument.

      We don't force conscientious objectors to serve in the military.
      We don't force religious parents to vaccinate their children.
      We don't even force the Amish to pay Social Security or Medicare taxes.

      About the only time we do force people to violate their belief systems is when it involves safety or imminent health issues.

      Your pedo mormon and fundie christian examples fall under the safety umbrella and If fundie Muslims wants to keep their female children out of school, they are welcome to do so, as long as they file the appropriate notice of intent to homeschool and get an education plan approved.

  • by xaotikdesigns (2662531) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:49AM (#42052341) Homepage Journal
    At school, you have to sit in a specific seat in a specific room, during specific times. You are told when to eat, and have to ask if you can use the bathroom. It's not happy freedom time. They aren't required to wear it outside of school, it's only for use inside the school building.

    Every job I've had since graduation in '99 has come with the requirement of an RFID tag either as a key fob or in my ID. I wore it with no question because otherwise, I wouldn't have been able to open any doors.

  • by guitarMan666 (1388859) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:51AM (#42052347)
    It may well violate her religious beliefs for which she should be exempt and it has long been the case that students' 4th Amendment rights are suspended while on campus at a public school. Since the ID only applies during school hours, is not implanted and is not actively transmitting her location, I fail to see this problem. It isn't dehumanizing to keep track of students on campus, it is responsible. It isn't a violation of her privacy as on school grounds you have relatively little. It isn't eavesdropping on her personal conversations. It's to keep students from cutting class! Nothing more. Can someone please explain why this is a problem?
  • She should lose (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Improv (2467) <pgunn@dachte.org> on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:58AM (#42052395) Homepage Journal

    Anyone whose brings "against my belief system" to a court of law and expects special consideration because of that should lose.

  • NFC? (Score:4, Informative)

    by chromas (1085949) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @02:58AM (#42052397)

    Student Refusing RFID Badge

    refusal to wear any badge containing an RFID tag

    school to adopt the NFC badges

    One of these things is not like the other.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:01AM (#42052419)

    The school letter says that they offered her the opportunity to wear an ID with the "battery and chip removed" on two occasions and she refused.

    So this isn't about RFID, it's about wearing ID.

    • No its about conformity. What other purpose of wearing the lanyard with the battery and RFID removed is there? It seems to me the school does not want to encourage other students to be individuals and determine for themselves if they agree with being tagged like cattle.
      • by will_die (586523)
        The RFID is for automated attendance, the wearing of the badge with a picture on it is to show that you have the right to be on a closed campus.
  • by physicsphairy (720718) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:01AM (#42052421) Homepage

    Technological "invasion" of privacy is not a problem when it simply augments what is already in place physically, i.e., I have no problem with security cameras at a bank, because it is a public area which you enter with the expectation of it being fully monitored and guarded at all times, regardless of whether a camera system is installed. Adding a camera system does not fundamentally impact your expectation of privacy at a bank. I *do* have a problem with sticking cameras on every telephone poll in the city. I expect police to patrol the streets, and give periodic checkups on how things are going, but monitoring every nook and cranny simultaneously and being able to follow my movements camera-to-camera is a gross change and significant limiting of my normal expectation of privacy.

    In this case, the girl is minor for whom the school is assuming responsibility during school hours and it is *expected* that they will be supervising her at all times. If teachers don't know where she is or what she is doing at any time during her stay that is indicative of negligence on their part, regardless of whether an RFID monitoring system is in place. So, as long as an uncovered and functional RFID tag is something she is only required to carry on school grounds, and she can put it in a foil sheath before and after, I do not have a big problem with the school adding some automation to what is already a comparable level of physical monitoring.

    I'm not saying there aren't some slippery slopes to be vigilant against, but as it's been described, I don't think she is losing much if any privacy by using the school ID card.

  • Just Overblown (Score:4, Insightful)

    by phikapjames (811889) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:11AM (#42052465)

    After reading the article, I can't find any issues here that can really be raised for a minor in school, that the school is responsible for, that is essentially any different than the school id I had 20 years ago. In the article, it even states the school offered to remove the RFID functionality so that the picture / barcode was left. Even then, wtf, its RFID, not GPS. It's not going to track her location at home and even then, the school isn't telling her to never take it off outside of school hours.

    Just more random thoughts:

    1) Just like my id from 20 years ago, we had to scan in the mornings for school for attendance which actually made it more efficient for school admins to get a quick idea of who wasn't there and contact parents quickly. The other option is having teachers do it manually, typing into system, and wasting their time.

    2) She's a minor that during school hours, the school is responsible for. More power if the school during those hours has a way to keep track of students on property (or lack of being on property) in a more secure way. I bet if for some reason she snuck off and something happened, these parents would be suing for neglecting to keep track of their kid during school hours.

    3) If this is such a huge issue, why aren't people going bat shit crazy having to wear their work ids, which most have barcodes, pictures, and rfids these days. Really no difference here people. Wear to work / school, both track you entering and leaving, then that is it.

    4) Their reasoning for religious is pure bs. My kid shouldn't wear a badge with the picture during school hours is the mark of the beast. Can you reach any harder for non sense. Again, lots of people for work do the same thing.

  • by BlueStrat (756137) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @03:24AM (#42052533)

    This system very likely is networked with the entire school district so as to collect total attendance numbers for the district.

    Considering the average level of network security that exists in most public school system IT departments (ie pwn-able by a savvy 12-yo), this looks like "Easy Internet Shopping For Pedophiles" as they can confirm their targets' location and schedule. And/or, they can snatch a kid, then just insert fake card-swipe data events to mimic the kid being at school and not chained to a wall somewhere. "Little Suzy has perfect school attendance, although nobody has seen her for months..."

    Strat

    • by AK Marc (707885) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @05:14AM (#42053053)

      Considering the average level of network security that exists in most public school system IT departments (ie pwn-able by a savvy 12-yo), this looks like "Easy Internet Shopping For Pedophiles" as they can confirm their targets' location and schedule.

      Given that a child is more likely to die getting to school than getting kidnapped by a pedo (by multiple orders of magnitude), I think that such considerations are insane to consider. There are more reports of people kidnapped by aliens and sexually assaulted than children kidnapped by pedos. Stastically, it just doesn't happen. You are more than 10,000 times more likely to be molested by a family member or kidnapped by a family member or killed by a family member than a stranger kidnapping by a pedo.

  • Why oh why? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kraut (2788) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:10AM (#42052753)

    Why do people insist on technological solutions for problems that don't need them?

    Voting machines - pointless; the number of volunteers or local government workers that can be drafted for a day scales with the size of the population.

    RFID badges for students to track attendance? Don't kid these days spend their lesson in front of a teacher, who could check attendance manually in about 30 seconds....like they have always done. I mean, what problems are they trying to solve?

  • RFID vs NFC (Score:4, Informative)

    by jac89 (979421) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:11AM (#42052761)
    I think it is important to make a distinction between RFID and NFC. NFC works only at very short ranges (a cm at most). So basically is only useful for tapping your card on a reader. This has a very different implication to RFID which can be scanned from several feet away, allowing much more ubiquitous monitoring without the input of the person being monitored.
  • Infowars? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anubis350 (772791) on Wednesday November 21, 2012 @04:57AM (#42052987)
    Whether this is an issue or not, linking to infowars is irresponsible of slashdot. Inforwars is a conspiracy nutjob site, not a credible or trustworthy news source. Find a better source or don't post BeatTheChip

"No job too big; no fee too big!" -- Dr. Peter Venkman, "Ghost-busters"

Working...