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Mars NASA Space Science

Curiosity Snaps 'Arm's Length' Self Portrait 96

Posted by timothy
from the pleased-to-meet-me dept.
astroengine writes "Using its robotic arm-mounted MAHLI camera, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has snapped, quite possibly, the most iconic image to come from the mission so far. By stitching together 55 high-resolution photos, the rover has snapped an 'arm's length' self portrait, capturing its location in the geologically interesting area known as 'Rocknest,' including its recent scoop marks in the Martian soil and the base of Mt. Sharp." Note to NASA: Please sell this image in the form of a fundraising poster.
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Curiosity Snaps 'Arm's Length' Self Portrait

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  • Re:Where is the arm? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by SomePgmr (2021234) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @04:07AM (#41863005) Homepage
    It's a series of images that, when stitched, conveniently exclude the arm.
  • Re:Where is the arm? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by kasperd (592156) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @04:12AM (#41863019) Homepage Journal

    It's a series of images that, when stitched, conveniently exclude the arm.

    True, but where does the arm attach to the rover? That end of the arm must be visible on any picture taking of that part of the rover. I am curious to see the individual parts, just to figure out how that part of the rover really looks.

  • Re:Where is the arm? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ford Prefect (8777) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @05:39AM (#41863259) Homepage

    You can see shadows from the turret on the end of the arm in a couple of the raw images [nasa.gov]. Whoever planned the arm manoeuvres did an incredible job - not only did the arm itself almost completely disappear in final stitched versions, the images have very little parallax despite the arm very much not being a proper panoramic camera mount.

    Of note - there was a second [nasa.gov] set of images taken - very similar to the first, but with a small horizontal offset. Likely result? 3D versions of the panorama!

    The only thing I want now is, perhaps in a year or so, a full 360-degrees spherical panorama of the rover parked near some interesting cliffs or other geography. Go on, NASA - do it! ;-)

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