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NASA Space The Almighty Buck Science

Singer Reportedly Outbids NASA for Space Tourist's Seat 242

Posted by samzenpus
from the money-well-spent dept.
RocketAcademy writes "ABC News is reporting that Phantom of the Opera singer/actress Sarah Brightman outbid NASA for a seat on a Soyuz flight to the International Space Station. Brightman reportedly paid more than $51 million. If that story is true, there may be some interesting bidding wars in the future."
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Singer Reportedly Outbids NASA for Space Tourist's Seat

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  • Music Video (Score:5, Funny)

    by PlastikMissle (2498382) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @06:31PM (#41544289)
    Now she can re-shoot "I Lost my Heart to a Starship Trooper" .... in space!
  • I hope she has magical stones embedded in her body.

  • When you try to bid against people who actually have money...

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @07:07PM (#41544573)

    .... Capitalism Defeats America?

    • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @09:09PM (#41545225) Journal

      In Capitalist Russia, we'll gladly take your money regardless of who you are. You wanted us to be capitalist, didn't you? Looks like we've learned well indeed.

      • Thank God for that too. Now everyone will realize just how profitable space can be. And SpaceX is right there to court the wealthy elite. What better way than to fund your R&D than from the rich which in turn pays for the engineers, scientists, all the other employees paychecks. Oh, and now you can grow the business too with an official spin-off of an entertainment division. It's sort of like the private sector taxing the rich, isn't it? **wink wink nod nod**

  • by wierd_w (1375923) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @07:32PM (#41544733)

    Clearly, there is a market for very wealthy socialites and starlets to go be pretty in outer space with some masterbating russian cosmonauts.

    Nasa is currently facing severe budget cuts.

    What nasa should do, instead of deploring this incident, is broker a deal with the russian space agency to split the profits from selling the occasiona NASA seat in the soyouz capsule to rich fucks.

    Considering the teeny budgets (comparatively) of both agencies, doing this could more than pay for quite a few fantastic developments in space technology and research.

    And, maybe some starlets will get to laugh at the lowly members of the mile-high-club, after losing their hearts to a starship trooper.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Don't you get it? There is no "NASA seat" in the Soyouz. Seats cost $51million and NASA's just another customer.

    • What nasa should do, instead of deploring this incident, is broker a deal with the russian space agency to split the profits from selling the occasiona NASA seat in the soyouz capsule to rich fucks.

      But, er, it looks like there is no "NASA seat" as such. It's only NASA for as long as NASA pays for it more than anyone else. Why would Roskosmos want to split the profits, if they can just pocket the whole thing for themselves?

      • by wierd_w (1375923)

        The same reason you would lower the price to sell more units; price elasticity.

        NASA is a garanteed repeat customer. $VacuousStarlet is not.

        If russia can be assured that there will be a proscribed and agreed upon reduction in launch requests from NASA, as an inside deal to harvest money from the rich and famous, it would be financially lucrative to both agencies. In most publicly traded commoditis markets, this is known as collusion, and is the very thing that RICO act and pals are meant to prohibit, but bei

        • The same reason you would lower the price to sell more units; price elasticity. NASA is a garanteed repeat customer. $VacuousStarlet is not.

          But NASA is a guaranteed repeat customer regardless of how RK behaves - they simply have nowhere else to go (yet), and they're not going to close down their manned programs altogether because they don't get an occasional seat.

          • by wierd_w (1375923)

            Not if the NASA/SpaceX relationship fully matures.

            • Yes, hence the (yet). But I don't think RK looks that far ahead.

              • by wierd_w (1375923)

                Quite. I am suggesting that NASA should discretely mention the prospects, in light of SpaceX being awarded a $1.6bn in launch contracts. Spin it as an opportunity to get in on the action.

  • This will be the needed bump for the real space race.

  • At first I thought it was the Singer Sewing Machine Company who bought a seat.
  • by Maudib (223520) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @10:56PM (#41545663)

    Thats cool. Now lets talk about Nasa's new 90% tax on commercial docking commercial flights to ISS...

    • by kellymcdonald78 (2654789) on Wednesday October 03, 2012 @11:29PM (#41545759)
      That's OK, the Soyuz capsules dock on the Russian side of ISS (which is also the side with most of the command and control capability) Think of ISS as the self contained Mir 2 with US, European and Japanese modules attached. The Russian side is fully capable of operating without the other components, the US side not so much (as congress cut several key US modules)
  • by dargaud (518470) <[ten.duagradg] [ta] [2todhsals]> on Thursday October 04, 2012 @12:37AM (#41546033) Homepage
    Never heard of her, and I don't care enough to google her. But I find it fucked up that singers, people who run after a ball and people who shuffle money between Excel cells are paid more than people who try to design fusion reactors or malaria vaccines. That is all.
    • by mianne (965568) on Thursday October 04, 2012 @01:07AM (#41546129)

      I agree with your sentiments, but the sad reality is that there's zero chance that you will sell 50,000 tickets at $150 a pop to any science fair or astrophysics lecture. Many ball games and concerts can easily generate that kind of revenue even before earnings from concessions and merchandise--and do it several times every year. Modern society places a much higher premium on being entertained than being informed. What's more, the scientist who develops the next wonder drug isn't going to earn lifelong royalties from it--those earnings will line the pockets of the pharmaceutical company which bought and patented it for several years though.

  • by DerekLyons (302214) <(fairwater) (at) (gmail.com)> on Thursday October 04, 2012 @07:26AM (#41547615) Homepage

    Again, a bad summary... Sarah Brightman didn't "outbid" NASA, as they weren't in competition for the same seat. Nor did she "bump" a NASA astronaut from a bought-and-paid-for seat. She paid for a spare seat more than NASA does for it's scheduled seat, in the same way that someone who buys a ticket at the last minute pays more than someone who bought a ticket three months in advance.
     
    So no, this is no indication that there are bidding wars on the horizon. Just more bad journalism and more bad summaries.

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

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