Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Mars NASA

Curiosity Gearing Up for Drive to Next Study Location 73

Posted by samzenpus
from the warming-up-the-engines dept.
Curiosity has spent most of the past 5 weeks running instrument and system checks, but on Friday that is all scheduled to change. The plan is to "drive, drive, drive" until a suitable rock for the rover's first robotic "hands-on" analysis is found, says mission manager Jennifer Trosper. The rover will head to a location about 1,300 feet away labeled "Glenelg," where three different types of rock intersect.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Curiosity Gearing Up for Drive to Next Study Location

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14, 2012 @02:04AM (#41331927)

    The rover will head to a location about 1,300 feet away...

    That be 12/36ths of a cubit, multiplied by four and 1/4 rods, then minus sixteen and 1/8th hogsheads.

    • by Brett Buck (811747) on Friday September 14, 2012 @02:31AM (#41332047)

      When you put a rover on Mars, you can pick whatever units you want.

    • by Grayhand (2610049)

      The rover will head to a location about 1,300 feet away...

      That be 12/36ths of a cubit, multiplied by four and 1/4 rods, then minus sixteen and 1/8th hogsheads.

      Guess I missed the joke since Hogshead is more of a volume measurement. Here's the Wikipedia explanation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogshead [wikipedia.org]

    • It's a robot, does it drive an automatic or a manual transmission? If it's an American made robot I doubt it's programmed to operate a clutch.
      • It's a robot, does it drive an automatic or a manual transmission? If it's an American made robot I doubt it's programmed to operate a clutch.

        Hey, I'm an American, functioning robot who learned early on in my programming to work a clutch. Unfortunately, Curiosity's steering wheel isn't left side mounted. ;-(

        • Ah, Britishisms. While 85% of the world drives on the left and the automobile was invented in America, Britain claims that the US, Germany, France, and basically everyone except New Zealand drives on the wrong side of the road.
          • by tehcyder (746570)

            While 85% of the world drives on the left

            There must be a lot of very drunk or highly incompetent drivers in the rest of the world then.

            It's in Britain that we drive on the left.

          • by Cimexus (1355033)

            In terms of population, around 1/3rd of the world drives on the left (side of the road, i.e. right-hand drive), and 2/3rds on the right (side of the road, i.e. left-hand drive)

            India alone, with well over a billion people, drives on the left. Add to that Japan, much of SE Asia, Australia and (as you mention) NZ. And no doubt some other ones I'm not aware of. It's by no means just one or two holdouts (where as the metric vs. imperial situation is really just the US and a couple of non-factor countries, versus

            • Geographical coverage is more important for this versus population. It's a matter of where you are. Let's say that something the size of, say, Germany had 2/3 the population of the world (doable but would be impractical) and drove on the left. The rest of the earth drives on the right. Would you say, well, 2/3 of the earth drives on the left?

              The nice thing about left hand drive is you can operate the gear stick with the left hand. Unfortunately, they still operate on the idea that the back brake is th

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      A meter is just a little over three feet. 5280 feet is a mile, a km is .6 of a mile. The math is easy, especially if you don't need much precision.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14, 2012 @03:19AM (#41332249)

    Taking a car when they could have just walked 400 meters. Don't they think of the environment?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Nasa's Curiosity Monster Truck Rover has an online control simulator! [imonstertruckgames.com] It takes about 8 minutes to actually work though.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Too bad the rover doesn't have external speakers. Then the public could fight over what song is playing over the radio.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Shotgun!

  • what hands? (Score:4, Funny)

    by FranTaylor (164577) on Friday September 14, 2012 @04:25AM (#41332413)

    I don't see hands on the ends of those robot arms. I don't know what they are talking about.

    The robot devil had to sign a deal with Fry to get hands.

  • 1300 feet to SI (Score:1, Informative)

    by rroman (2627559)
    1300 feet that is 396.24 m. (Score:5, Informative)
  • by SternisheFan (2529412) on Friday September 14, 2012 @06:38AM (#41332863)
    I submitted this for a story, may be redundant. Here's a link to the landing in enhanced 1080 hd video with sound effects added in. http://www.geek.com/articles/geek-pick/curiosity-landing-video-gets-sound-visuals-enhanced-to-1080p-20120914/ [geek.com]
  • Glenelg? (Score:4, Funny)

    by aglider (2435074) on Friday September 14, 2012 @07:23AM (#41333015) Homepage

    Curiosity will certainly end up in a palindrome loop!

    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      What's with all the Australian place names being used?

      The landing site was adjacent to a point they are calling Goulburn (a town in south-eastern New South Wales [goo.gl]).

      Glenelg [goo.gl] is a suburb (and rather nice beach) in Adelaide, South Australia. As far as my Google-fu can determine, it is the only location named as such on earth.

      There's also a few other names being used by NASA to refer to nearby points of interest that seem to have Australian origin. My only guess is that it has something to do with the fact that t

  • spent most of the past 5 weeks running instrument and system checks

    Curiosity
    is almost the worst mean of transportation! Almost, because the difference between traveling on Curiosity and
    airplane is that you won't have to get a prostate check before boarding Curiosity.

    • by Chris Burke (6130)

      If Curiosity encountered a prostate on Mars, I'm sure it'd want to investigate it with its laser, and possibly drill.

If I'd known computer science was going to be like this, I'd never have given up being a rock 'n' roll star. -- G. Hirst

Working...