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Canada Science Technology

Canadian Scientists Bind High-Temp Superconductor Components With Scotch Tape 97

Posted by timothy
from the move-over-duct-tape dept.
First time accepted submitter halightw writes "Scotch tape really can fix anything according to a new study where it was used to induce super conductivity by taping two pieces of material together. A "proximity effect" occurs when a superconducting material is able to induce superconducting behavior in a second material — a semiconductor that does not typically enjoy superconductivity." All that and X-rays, too. Related: An anonymous reader writes "Scientist at University of Leipzig in Germany claim to have measured room-temperature superconducting in specially treated graphite grains. The measurements were reproduced independently before the announcement was made. More tests need to be done to verify the extent of superconductivity and whether the effect can be extended and scaled to be practical."
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Canadian Scientists Bind High-Temp Superconductor Components With Scotch Tape

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  • Sometimes (Score:3, Interesting)

    by symes (835608) on Thursday September 13, 2012 @11:43AM (#41324571) Journal

    Just because they might be at the cutting edge of scientific progress does not mean common household goods, that were once thought of as perhaps as innovative as superconductivity, cannot be useful. Maybe I am stretching things in this case, perhaps they should have used duct tape. Anyhow, there must be other examples of this kind of thing?

  • by Llynix (586718) <llynix@ g m a i l . com> on Thursday September 13, 2012 @11:48AM (#41324633) Homepage Journal

    Helped discover graphene:
    http://science.energy.gov/news/in-focus/2011/03-25-11/ [energy.gov]

  • by Meshach (578918) on Thursday September 13, 2012 @11:49AM (#41324661)

    So the really interesting part of this story - that superconductivity can be induced in high-temperature materials that haven't been grown in proximity - is completely overshadowed by the tape that held the experiment together?

    Fuck journalism.

    You must be new here...

  • Re:Sometimes (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 13, 2012 @11:53AM (#41324699)

    I remember the 2010 Nobel prize winners in physics also used scotch tape to produce graphene, by peeling layers of carbon off of graphite:
    http://motherboard.vice.com/2010/10/7/physics-nobel-prize-winners-secret-scotch-tape--2

  • by BMOC (2478408) on Thursday September 13, 2012 @12:11PM (#41324895)

    So the really interesting part of this story - that superconductivity can be induced in high-temperature materials that haven't been grown in proximity - is completely overshadowed by the tape that held the experiment together?

    Fuck journalism.

    I think you mean... that superconductivity can be induced at high-temperatures in materials that haven't been grown in proximity... And yes I find that far more interesting than using tape to accomplish it. Generally superconductivity dislikes material boundaries. This is why crystal grain boundaries (paradoxically) help control superconductivity in thin-film YBCO and similar high-temp materials by preventing eddy vorticies from interfering with flow. I had no idea you could induce superconductivity in a different crystal through proximity. in fact all of the knowledge I have on the subject (I did my graduate thesis on YBCO thin films) tells me it shouldn't be possible.

  • by mark-t (151149) <markt@@@lynx...bc...ca> on Thursday September 13, 2012 @12:33PM (#41325099) Journal
    Don't hold your breath. There are three phenomena associated with superconductivity: zero resistance, the Meissner effect, and a superconducting phase transition. Only the last one has been observed so far in the graphite-based superconductor. But it's my understanding that it's only the first two that are practically useful. Either of the first two effects observed on a macroscopic level at room temperatures or above, and that is tractable to scale, would be utterly revolutionary, and the long-term impact on industrialized society would likely be beyond anything we've yet conceived.

    But yeah... I wouldn't hold my breath on this.

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