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Meat the Food of the Future 705

Posted by samzenpus
from the clean-your-plate dept.
Hugh Pickens writes writes "BBC reports that rising food prices, the growing population, and environmental concerns are just a few issues that have food futurologists thinking about what we will eat in the future and how we will eat it. In the UK, meat prices are anticipated to have a huge impact on our diets as some in the food industry prognosticate meat prices could double in the next five to seven years, making meat a luxury item. 'In the West many of us have grown up with cheap, abundant meat,' says Morgaine Gaye. 'Rising prices mean we are now starting to see the return of meat as a luxury. As a result we are looking for new ways to fill the meat gap.' Insects will become a staple of our diet. They cost less to raise than cattle, consume less water and do not have much of a carbon footprint. Plus, there are an estimated 1,400 species that are edible to man. 'Things like crickets and grasshoppers will be ground down and used as an ingredient in things like burgers.' But insects will need an image overhaul if they are to become more palatable to the squeamish Europeans and North Americans, says Gaye. 'They will become popular when we get away from the word insects and use something like mini-livestock (PDF).' Another alternative would be lab grown meat as a recent study by Oxford University found growing meat in a lab rather than slaughtering animals would significantly reduce greenhouse gases, energy consumption and water use. Prof Mark Post, who led the Dutch team of scientists at Maastricht University that grew strips of muscle tissue using stem cells taken from cows, says he wants to make lab meat "indistinguishable" from the real stuff, but it could potentially look very different. Finally algae could provide a solution to some the world's most complex problems, including food shortages as some in the sustainable food industry predict algae farming could become the world's biggest cropping industry. Like insects, algae could be worked into our diet without us really knowing by using seaweed granules to replace salt in bread and processed foods. 'The great thing about seaweed is it grows at a phenomenal rate,' says Dr Craig Rose, executive director of the Seaweed Health Foundation. 'It's the fastest growing plant on earth.'"
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Meat the Food of the Future

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  • by NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:13PM (#40887055)
    Land Lobsters.(They're both arthropods) Then you can charge a premium for them.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by ColdWetDog (752185)

      But why? If human kind managed to get most of the way to today without McDonald's 'burgers', could we not go back to fruits and grains and the occasional wooly mammoth of our ancestors?

      We know a lot about nutrition - we don't need animal protein to survive. Although, personally, life without an Egg McMuffin may well not be worth it.

      • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:19PM (#40887087) Homepage

        Although "Mosquito McMuffin" does have a certain ring to it....

      • by CheshireDragon (1183095) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:22PM (#40887115) Homepage
        I have managed to ditch fast food for the last 3yrs, lost some weight and don't miss it one bit.
        However, I am a carnivore and I will not give up my Chicken, red meat and the occasional Pork item(usually bacon or sausage).
        • by zippthorne (748122) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @03:04PM (#40887955) Journal

          It's probably not environmentally friendly, but I recommend you also try some animals not in the "big four," if you haven't already. I have found that when people describe things as, "gamey," what they mean is that it doesn't taste like dry, bland, overcooked chicken. Oddly, some of those same people will occasionally complain that "everything tastes like chicken..."

          • by hey! (33014) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @09:13PM (#40890409) Homepage Journal

            "Gamey" to me means it has a metallic, "liver-ish" aftertaste. But I happen to like that. Most Americans won't touch organ meat, but you get a hint of that flavor in game muscle tissue.

            I once had a huge wild duck pig-out with a hunter friend of mine. The drumsticks, which wild ducks hardly use, were indistinguishable from domestic duck. If anything they were sweeter. The breast (which the animal uses to fly) was a much more powerful muscle, and it was distinctly gamey. I actually enjoyed the gamey breast better, because domestic duck I can have any day of the week. It also helped that the duck was cooked to perfection -- there isn't a lot of margin for error in cooking game if you don't want it to end up like shoe leather. This was at a Chinese restaurant that was willing to cook its customers game -- how cool is that?

            I've had rattlesnake, which wasn't exactly chicken-like, but it did have a remote resemblance. I think the "tastes like chicken" thing means "leaner than marbled beef". When I was young, pork tasted quite different than it does now. Hog farmers, conscious of the negative public attitude toward fat, are producing lean pork that is very close to chicken in flavor. Recently I had some wild boar, and it was a revelation. The flavor was so intense I wasn't sure at first that I liked it. Imagine the taste difference between a pork chop and a chicken breast, then multiply that by 100x.

            The plant equivalent of chicken, by the way, is "asparagus". For some reason many wild plants seem to remind people of asparagus.

        • by Aighearach (97333) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @03:14PM (#40888043) Homepage

          I will not give up my Chicken, red meat and the occasional Pork item.

          You will if it gets priced off the market and farmers switch to raising grasshoppers because they can do more volume.

      • by jedidiah (1196) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:37PM (#40887255) Homepage

        I suppose you could try and eat like your ancestors. Do you want to live like them too?

        I think that's the part people are missing here. It's like a bunch of people at the SCA or Ren fair acting like they all would be Lords and Ladies when in fact they would be the nearly starving peasants.

      • by History's Coming To (1059484) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:05PM (#40887485) Journal
        I've had chilli flavoured oven baked mealworms, very tasty, similar to savoury popcorn. Locusts aren't bad either, although a little overly-crunchy in parts. Termites, ants, various mosquito/midge types and even arachnids are popular in various parets of the world. Far more efficient to produce than cow too.
    • Obligitory (Score:5, Funny)

      by tuxgeek (872962) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:26PM (#40887147)
      Soylent Green
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_Green
    • by Dragonslicer (991472) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:40PM (#40887285)

      Land Lobsters.(They're both arthropods) Then you can charge a premium for them.

      I think that would complete the circle. Lobsters used to be called the cockroaches of the sea. They were considered just barely good enough to give to your slaves.

      • by TheLink (130905) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:44PM (#40887789) Journal

        Who apparently weren't too happy about it:
        http://traveltips.usatoday.com/history-maine-lobster-21560.html [usatoday.com]

        During colonial times, lobster was food for the poverty stricken, prisoners and indentured servants. In the Massachusetts colony that encompassed the land that became known as Maine, indentured servants protested and had instructions written in to their seven-year contracts that they would not be forced to eat lobster more than three times a week.

        • by MacGyver2210 (1053110) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @04:33PM (#40888633)

          Only USA Today would quote a floral designer on the history of crustaceans.

        • by CAIMLAS (41445) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @06:14PM (#40889303) Homepage

          Slaves hated Lobster for much the same reasons that people today prefer things like beef or "rabbit starvation" is named after rabbits.

          Lobsters, like rabbits, have very low fat content. If your meat does not have fat, you are going to have to figure out how you're going to get fat into your diet.

          Substituting starches for fats is not going to help you long-term. Your body will convert those starches into fat, yes - but the body will store it and not use it directly. You'll end up being hungry shortly after eating. You'll also end up suffering mental disorders due to fat nutrient deficiency over time.

          But yeah. Lobster's great and all, but there's a damn good reason people dip it in butter sauce.

          Eating a diet of bugs will suffer the same problem. They have zero fat.

          • by luis_a_espinal (1810296) on Monday August 06, 2012 @07:13AM (#40893157) Homepage

            Slaves hated Lobster for much the same reasons that people today prefer things like beef or "rabbit starvation" is named after rabbits.

            Lobsters, like rabbits, have very low fat content. If your meat does not have fat, you are going to have to figure out how you're going to get fat into your diet.

            Substituting starches for fats is not going to help you long-term. Your body will convert those starches into fat, yes - but the body will store it and not use it directly. You'll end up being hungry shortly after eating. You'll also end up suffering mental disorders due to fat nutrient deficiency over time.

            But yeah. Lobster's great and all, but there's a damn good reason people dip it in butter sauce.

            Eating a diet of bugs will suffer the same problem. They have zero fat.

            That is absolutely not true. But let's skip that for a second, and address it as if it were true.

            Those problems can be solved by efficiently and economicallyenriching the food with fats. Notice the words "efficiently and economically". This is a problem we can solve much better than our predecessors. There are quite a few sources of fat that are relatively cheap to mass produce - flax seeds, jojoba, algae, fruit seeds (from which oil is currently extracted for addition to pet food/animal fodder), palm kernels, grasses seeds, hemp seeds, plant roots. Many vegetable things that are not considered edible can be processed to extract edible oils.

            Also, there is algae and krill that could be economically harvested and mixed with insect food.

            But going back to your original claim, the claim that insects have zero fat is unsubstantiated. Grubs and pupae are known for their enormous fats and protein content, with the iconic Australian Wichetty grub leading the - moth larvae, rhino beetle worm, silk worm, termites, agave worm, ant and bee pupae and many others to name a few. Insect eggs could also be exploited that way.

            You sir, are wrong-o.

      • by perpenso (1613749) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:46PM (#40887807)

        Land Lobsters.(They're both arthropods) Then you can charge a premium for them.

        I think that would complete the circle. Lobsters used to be called the cockroaches of the sea. They were considered just barely good enough to give to your slaves.

        IIRC ...

        There were actually laws in the Massachusetts Bay colony limiting how often you could feed your servants lobster. Are they still on the books?

        Lobsters were heavily harvested but were often used as fertilizer for the fields.

        At some point someone applied butter heavily, served it to the queen, she said she liked it and things changed virtually overnight. The trash food of the lowest "class" became gourmet.

        This still happens today. My grandfather grew up in Italy poor and hungry. He laughs a little when looking at the menu in Italian restaurants in the U.S. today. Some of the featured and expensive dishes offered are quite literally the meals he was mocked for eating as a child by the kids from wealthier families.

  • Not for me (Score:5, Funny)

    by paintballer1087 (910920) <paintballer1087@gm[ ].com ['ail' in gap]> on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:14PM (#40887057)
    No lab grown meat or bugs for me. I'll just stick with good ol' Soylent Green!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:17PM (#40887067)

    Under-abundance of meat
    Over-abundance of humans

    If you convert the over-abundance into the under-abundance, they balance themselves out.

  • If you ask me (Score:4, Interesting)

    by tlambert (566799) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:18PM (#40887077)

    Our population just topped 7 billion; if you ask me, there is already too much meat.

  • by bmo (77928) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:19PM (#40887085)

    Prof Mark Post, who led the Dutch team of scientists at Maastricht University that grew strips of muscle tissue using stem cells taken from cows, says he wants to make lab meat "indistinguishable" from the real stuff,

    Why stop there? Why not use human muscular stem cells? Then it could be branded as Ambrosia Plus.

    --
    BMO

    • Think of the creepy dinner parties those wealthy enough to run their own batches will have!

      "I put a lot of myself into this dish, I hope you enjoy it!"

  • by vlm (69642) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:21PM (#40887105)

    'Things like crickets and grasshoppers will be ground down and used as an ingredient in things like burgers.'

    Um, yeah, you just go on thinking thats a "future tense" activity. Maybe not intentionally, maybe a lower percentage...

    • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:26PM (#40887635)

      Um, yeah, you just go on thinking thats a "future tense" activity. Maybe not intentionally, maybe a lower percentage...

      Perhaps you are under the mistaken impression that Westerners are the majority on this planet?

      In Africa, of course we Westerners expect this sort of thing, here in America, we have almost all seen Andrew Zimmern go the these exotic Third World locals and dish himself up a big plate of bugs.

      But in many Asian counties such as the Korean Peninsula, certainly China, and probably Japan, bugs are not just the diet of poor people.

      I've eaten many a bag full of butter fried grasshoppers (or some similar insect) from street stalls and shops right in downtown Seoul. And given some of the "exotic" (disgusting?) sea life that Japanese eat, bugs are surely in their diet as well.

      Maybe MAYBE sometime in the future, insect protein will be added to ground meat products and baked goods for consumption by Westerners, be we are a VERY squeamish society in the United States, and I'll bet Western Europeans are much the same way.

    • by Bogtha (906264)

      It's not even a low percentage. Carmine [wikipedia.org], the red food colouring used in many types of food, is basically powdered insect remains.

  • by future assassin (639396) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:25PM (#40887131) Homepage

    there are lots of way to dress up vegetables to make even meat eaters drool all over. Just look outside of the western culture for some recipes. Unfortunately for some its too much work/time to cook up some Curry or Thai so they'll just stick to SPAM.

  • by tomhath (637240) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:26PM (#40887139)
    ...because a bunch of foolish politicians decided making fuel from corn would be a good idea. Once that stops we'll go back to raising beef on non-tillable rangeland and pasture and finishing it with a small amount of inexpensive corn.
  • by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojo@worldCHEETAH3.net minus cat> on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:26PM (#40887149) Homepage

    The EU has a deliberate policy of remaining self sufficient for food. Euro haters love to rage about the huge grain mountains and heavy farm animal subsidies, but the whole point of them is to make sure the EU will always have enough farming capacity to feed itself should the need arise.

    We will never allow ourselves to get to the stage where we don't have enough meat. Yeah, India's population will keep on increasing, but it won't matter much to us. The population of Europe is stabilising and even falling in some places. The third world will carry on starving until they have enough education to limit the number of children they have, but the EU will just keep transferring money from the rich to subsidy for farm animal meat for the rest of us.

    • by JOrgePeixoto (853808) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:23PM (#40887613) Journal

      The third world will carry on starving until they have enough education to limit the number of children they have

      There is no global overpopulation. Some places (such as Japan) are already experiencing population aging and decline, which is bad in many ways. Other places (such as the USA and specially Europe) already have sub-replacement fertility rates, and their population only grows because of demographic lag and immigration. It is predicted the the European Union population (now at 503M) will reach zero natural population increase by 2015 and zero total population increase in 2035 (at 520M), then start declining.

      The USA will grow from 310M in 2010 to 403M in 2050. [1]
      Asia will increase from 4.2B in 2010 to 5.1B in 2050, then start declining. [2]

      The only region that is really growing is Africa. It will increase from 1B in 2010 to 2.2B in 2050. [2] Then its population density will be 73/km2. [3] Compare that to the current population density in Portugal (115/km2), in South Korea (487/km2) and in Taiwan (641/km2). [4]

      Global population is predicted to grow from 7B in 2011 to 9B in 2050 and 10B in 2100 [5] and start falling soon after [6].

      And according to [7], 40-50% of America-produced food is thrown away. According to [8], 1/3 of the world food is thrown away.
      And this does not take into account that people eat, just for pleasure, excessive quantities of resource-intensive food (such as meat). If Americans/Europeans want to help the poor, an easy way would be to decrease (say, by 30%) their diet of meat. This will immediately reduce food demand and, for double bonus, the saved money can be donated to charity. And much arable land is wasted on subsidized inefficient corn-based ethanol. You can lobby your government to stop that.

      Plus, there does not seem to be a negative correlation between population density and GDP per capita. [9]

      African hunger is not caused by overpopulation. It is caused by corrupt and authoritarian governments, and by guerrillas/terrorists motivated by Marxism, theocractic Islamism, ethnic hate or simply greed.

      Overpopulation fear-mongering is very old - at least as old as Malthus. One of its more recent incarnations was the 1968 book "The Population Bomb", which predicted mass starvation to occur in the 1970s.

      Anyway, for better or for worse, there is already strong action taken by individuals, foundations, and Western governments, to restrict fertility in Africa.

      1 : http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Analytical-Figures/htm/fig_11.htm [un.org]
      2 : http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Analytical-Figures/htm/fig_2.htm [un.org]
      3 : According to [2], Africa will have 2.2B people in 2050, and according to Google[10] and Wikipedia [11], the area of Africa is 30,221,532 km2
      4 : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sovereign_states_and_dependent_territories_by_population_density [wikipedia.org]
      5 : http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Analytical-Figures/htm/fig_1.htm [un.org]
      6 : http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Analytical-Figures/htm/fig_6.htm [un.org]
      7 : http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/news/ng.asp?id=56376-us-wastes-half [foodnavigator-usa.com]
      8 : http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/74192/icode/ [fao.org]
      9 : http://sanamagan.wordpress.com/2011/03/10/population-population-density-gdp-per-capita-ppp/ [wordpress.com]
      10 : https://www.google.com.br/search?q=africa+area [google.com.br]
      11 :

    • by dnaumov (453672)

      The third world will carry on starving until they have enough education to limit the number of children they have, but the EU will just keep transferring money from the rich to subsidy for farm animal meat for the rest of us.

      How naive. What do you think is a common cause of wars?

  • by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:27PM (#40887169)

    Meat the Food of the Future

    Maybe I'm getting old, but I just cannot fathom 'meating' my future food. Well.. maybe if it's apple pie.

  • and the over/under of future food overlords jokes at 12.

  • by Scorch_Mechanic (1879132) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:29PM (#40887187) Journal

    So long as we in the US continue to subsidize corn and raise livestock on it, meat will remain in easy reach of residents of the united states. That's not even considering how an entire huge segment of the population would take the news that they can't do big barbecues anymore. I'm not saying this is a good thing, I'm saying this is what I anticipate will happen.

    • by garcia (6573)

      You know, even grass fed meat isn't all that cost prohibitive when you think about it. Yeah, it's slightly more expensive but it's not like I would stop eating it all together if the corn subsidies were eliminated.

      I'm guessing a lot of people would do the same because, well, most Americans hate vegetables and limit them in their diet as much as possible.

      • by jedidiah (1196) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:47PM (#40887345) Homepage

        The land that now grows corn to feed cattle used to feed the bison directly. That grass was able to sustain bison herds the size of a small country. This all happened without any human management. So the idea that we all have to get used to Tofu is a little silly.

        • by BZ (40346) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:19PM (#40887587)

          According to http://www.americanbisonsocietyonline.org/AboutUs/Timeline.aspx [americanbi...online.org] there were 25-30 million bison on the Great Plains before we started seriously hunting them to the point of reducing their population.

          According to http://www.beefusa.org/beefindustrystatistics.aspx [beefusa.org] there are about 95 million cattle in the US as of 2011. About 33 million were harvested in 2011.

          So if we're willing to reduce the beef production by a factor of 3 from where we are now, we can probably avoid human management. Otherwise, chances are human management is needed.

          That said, we certainly have enough beef for just the US here; the problems, if any, start when beef exports start competing on price with domestic purchases.

    • by sociocapitalist (2471722) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:28PM (#40887649)

      So long as we in the US continue to subsidize corn and raise livestock on it, meat will remain in easy reach of residents of the united states. That's not even considering how an entire huge segment of the population would take the news that they can't do big barbecues anymore. I'm not saying this is a good thing, I'm saying this is what I anticipate will happen.

      There's already a substantial percentage of people in the US who can't afford to eat. To me anything over zero is substantial given the wealth of the US and here we're talking about 506,000 households or roughly 49 million Americans (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/us/17hunger.html).

      Before the idiots on here slam the media, I'll point out that even if you cut this number by a factor of ten you'd still have five million Americans not having enough food. Five million. In the richest country in the world.

      I probably don't have to say just how pitiful that is.

  • Idiomatics (Score:5, Funny)

    by FrankDrebin (238464) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:29PM (#40887191) Homepage
    Hungry? Get some grub.
  • by CheshireDragon (1183095) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:36PM (#40887241) Homepage
    "Plus, there are an estimated 1,400 species that are edible to man."
    Edible doesn't mean tasty. I am open to the idea as I eat spiders in my sleep, but there are some that don't look to tempting and I would most likely get very hungry before eating one.
    I like that term as well: 'mini-livestock' I think it will stick hahaha
    I think we can make the switch, but I am sure it will be the pussy switch just like Vegetarians. Open up there freezer and what do you see? Veggie-BURGER, meat substituted STEAK and all other kinds of crap that are vegetable based, but looks and tastes like meat. And the therapist said "I" was in denial?
    • by rrohbeck (944847)

      King crabs aren't much different from huge spiders.
      That's why I never liked lobster. Nothing but huge bugs.

  • I, Caveman (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:41PM (#40887295)

    So, interestingly enough... I caught an episode of Morgan Spurloch's new docu/experiment.

    In the episode I saw 2 people leave, and one essentially go crazy from lack of protein. What happened first was the smallest thinnest woman probed to be the most incapable of dealing with the extreme lack of meat protein and fat. She voluntarily left when the "tribe" failed twice to kill an elk. Strangely enough the supposed semi-pro hunter of the group voluntarily left second. He couldn't deal with the frustration of failing to kill an elk with a spear and atlatl. Morgan kept trying to kill a muskrat, but also couldn't remain patient enough to land a killing blow.

    The weirdest thing was how the sanity of the vegetarian played out. She consistently tried to brainwash the other tribe members by constantly complaining about animal meat. IIRC she successfully swayed the tiny girl that left to not eat any of the fish they caught because none of the other tribe members would remove the head... Yes. She refused dire nutrients because it had a face on it and the vegetarian brain-washed here into essentially starving until she volunteered to leave from lack of food and partial dehydration.

    The next morning after the semi-pro hunter left, a few of the tribe members (including the woman that got her feet wet and complained about being cold while intentionally avoiding huddling around the campfire) set out early to stalk the elk herd. Back at camp, the vegetarian did literally nothing for the tribe; however she made herself a nice salad of grass and leaves... ROFL. The other members at camp started building a drying rack in the hopes the hunters brought back some meat to preserve.

    The first atlatl strike missed the target and almost startled the herd into fleeing, however the second guy landed a beautiful shot to the neck of a large buck. They waited a few moments until it collapsed then went in for the kill. I was proud to see the woman (I think her name was Manu) make the kill shot by puncturing the elk's lung. All 4 members of the hunting party became extremely emotional about killing the large majestic mammal.

    They performed a small ritual, thanking the animal for its sacrifice, then proceeded to draw and quarter it. They hauled over 200lbs of fresh elk meat back to camp for all of the tribe to share... except the vegetarian.

    The vegetarian immediately began complaining that they had murdered an animal to consume. She began gagging in what I believe was an attempt at spreading a mass hysteric type social reflex (think of a yawn and how it seems to spread). Then came the complaints about how gross it was to butcher it in the field, and she wasn't going to eat any it because it was against her beliefs.

    Here is where they pan to the actual scientists running the show. They began to discuss the ramifications of tribe members that refuse to contribute to the tribe, and how in ancient times there were rules to compensate for the lazy and belligerent. Next they began to discuss how if the "experiment" continued how she would rapidly become emaciated and essentially starve to death from lack of edible plant proteins in the wild.

    So, the moral is that animals need to die for homo sapien sapiens to survive in our modern bodies as they evolved. Over the last 3 years I have been cutting out plant protein/sugar as my staple and replacing it with animal protein/fat. I feel 100x healthier and happier than I have in over a decade. As long as there are ungulates I will never return to plants as my staple diet. If that means poaching, so be it. Humans require animal protein/fat to be healthy. It's scientifically proven.

    • I have a friend who's veg but allows for dairy products, which is where I believe she gets a lot of her protein. That might be an interesting question, is whether or not cows as dairy machines could provide the same protein/fat requirements as meat on using less energy or space.
    • Re:I, Caveman (Score:4, Informative)

      by data2 (1382587) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @06:07PM (#40889271)

      Most serious vegetarians (I consider myself to be one), know full well that only modern methods of science are able to extract needed amounts of protein from plant sources, be it through tofu, seitan, tempeh or else. Humans are not made to be fueled solely by salad and grass.

      Bio-availability of plant protein is lower when it is only from one source, and while most people eat a diverse enough mix, one can get problems with it quite easily. But by mixing, this can be greatly improved (as can be witnessed by the protein shakes for body builders that are purely plant based).

  • by Revotron (1115029) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:42PM (#40887309)

    Is the BBC turning into The Onion? Or is the author just plain daft to start with?

    Substituting the words "mini-livestock" in place of "dead insects"? What the fuck are these Brits smoking?

    I know crushed-up insects may pass for a semi-decent gourmet meal by British culinary standards, but here in America I'll stick to my 97% lean ground beef and REAL pork chops, thanks.

  • by Kohath (38547) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:42PM (#40887311)

    In the future, people will eat essentially the same things we eat now. Rising prices for meat will cause meat producers to make more money, which will cause more people to raise more livestock for meat, which will cause meat prices to stabilize at a supply/demand equilibrium.

    Environmental concerns will become less and less important to people as people learn that human concerns are less and less important to environmentalists. Practical conservation efforts will regain the environmental mainstream, overthrowing the hairshirt doomsday environmentalism that peaked in about 2005.

    Futurists and futurologists (?) will continue to predict "interesting" futures, because no one writes an article about you when you say things will stay about the same.

    • by eclectro (227083)

      which will cause more people to raise more livestock for meat,

      Expect to see the return and rise of the local family farm. If chickens cost $100 each, suddenly they will become very lucrative. Also, more less desirable meat cuts of an animal become marketable in one form or another. And let's not forget that the current more agrarian third world countries will see a boon in the export of their farm products including meat.

      All of which leads to a stabilization of meat prices.

  • Futurists (Score:5, Funny)

    by Stirling Newberry (848268) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @01:53PM (#40887383) Homepage Journal
    Companies hire ethicists when they want to do something unethical, and people call in futurists, to come up with ideas that have no future.
  • by divisionbyzero (300681) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:06PM (#40887501)

    We will find a way to continue to produce food efficiently, mostly for the reason that it is very profitable to do so.

  • Bio-reactor milk? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Richard_J_N (631241) on Sunday August 05, 2012 @02:09PM (#40887523)

    I've always wondered why we use cows to generate milk. Given that most of milk is relatively simple (water, sugars, chalk, oil), why can't we have bioreactor into which we put grass-clippings, and get out something roughly similar to milk?

    The need for adding protein, and some kinds of vitamins might be moderately tricky, but I should think that this wouldn't matter for many applications. The only thing that would require the full complexity of real milk would be in making (good quality) cheese. This would also appeal to vegans, some vegetarians, and many people with lactose intolerance.

I've never been canoeing before, but I imagine there must be just a few simple heuristics you have to remember... Yes, don't fall out, and don't hit rocks.

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