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Software Science Idle

Optimizing Your Caffeine Intake With an App 134

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-another-shot dept.
MrSeb writes "Two doctors at Penn State University have developed Caffeine Zone, a free iOS app that tells you the perfect time to take a coffee break to maintain an optimal amount of caffeine in your blood — and, perhaps more importantly, it also tells you when to stop drinking tea and coffee, so that caffeine doesn't interrupt your sleep. By reading through lots of peer-reviewed studies, doctors Frank E. Ritter and Kuo-Chuan Yeh found that a caffeine level of between 200 and 400mg in your bloodstream provides optimal mental alertness, and that you should be below 100mg when you try to sleep. Caffeine Zone plots your caffeination level after you consume caffeine, and warns you if that big afternoon coffee will keep you up at night. It also lets you change the 'optimal' and 'sleep' values if you're particularly resistant or weak to caffeine."
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Optimizing Your Caffeine Intake With an App

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  • Hackable? (Score:5, Funny)

    by wbr1 (2538558) on Thursday February 16, 2012 @11:09PM (#39069969)
    Than I can use an Arduino with a bluetooth shield and make it control my IV Drip Mr. Coffee machine?

    Hold on, I am not thinking clearly, my iBarista seems to have crashed.
  • Android version? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Is there an Android version in the works? Or better yet, a desktop app that tells me time to get a cuppa?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I use Caffeine Tracker (https://market.android.com/details?id=com.cafapppro) - there's also a lite version with a few missing features and adverts but 63p isn't bad.
      I'm not really sure why this iOS app is getting attention seeing as that Android app has been around for a while.

  • Simpler method (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ackthpt (218170) on Thursday February 16, 2012 @11:16PM (#39070023) Homepage Journal

    Realize I'm getting edgy and having trouble concentrating --- Stop drinking coffee.

    I've had caffeine problems in the past and am now rolling back to Green Tea. Just enough of a prod. The problem with Coffee is it's a big hit and the subsequent sips provide a declining return on alertness, but an increase in fidgeting, anxiety, etc. A more modest dose from tea and I'm less likely to become accustomed to high levels of caffeine which only serve to keep me at a body-acclimated "normal".

    I appreciate what they're trying to do, but really, each person has their own caffeine profile and has to find where it works and where it doesn't.

    • by Osgeld (1900440)

      "I appreciate what they're trying to do, but really, each person has their own caffeine profile and has to find where it works and where it doesn't."

      ayep

      I don't drink coffee, so on the odd occasion that I grab a small foam cup at work I find it makes me edgy, and it actually makes me jittery ... breaking concentration. I sometimes drink tea, but tea is a PITA when no one else drinks it, and unlike coffee which I like best black, I cant stand tea without a little sugar in it, which early in the morning gives

      • That should depend on your type of tea. Some tea's like the lemon ones I can't have without sugar or its too bitter. Other ones like chai, I could not imagine drinking it with sugar ( but that depends on the brand too. The tim hortons ones are good with 2 bags and let it soak till its dark ).

        But just experiment around. I'm sure you'll find a tea you like without any additives.
      • by cmdr_tofu (826352)

        How is tea a PITA? I just take a cup, drop two Ridgways organic Earl Grey teabags add water and pop it in the microwave. My problem with coffee is I tend to drink the whole pot, but with tea, I brew 1 cup at a time, so I can have that morning cup without being tempted to drink more because "there is more in the pot going to waste"

    • Re:Simpler method (Score:5, Interesting)

      by PopeRatzo (965947) on Friday February 17, 2012 @12:13AM (#39070463) Homepage Journal

      I've had caffeine problems in the past and am now rolling back to Green Tea. Just enough of a prod. The problem with Coffee is it's a big hit and the subsequent sips provide a declining return on alertness, but an increase in fidgeting, anxiety, etc. A more modest dose from tea and I'm less likely to become accustomed to high levels of caffeine which only serve to keep me at a body-acclimated "normal".

      Coffee is great in small doses. The huge mugs that Americans favor and the super mega vente that most people buy at the coffee shop is way overkill. I found that coffee was making me edgy until a friend from Europe gave me a set of very nice small cups, maybe six ounces. If I have one of those in the morning, sitting on my back porch with the wife, it gets me off to a nice running start and doesn't keep me awake at night.

      After that, it's just herb tea or slivovitza. Once in a while a Yoohoo and Jagermeister over crushed ice, because the elk blood is good for my gout.

      • by ackthpt (218170)

        I've had caffeine problems in the past and am now rolling back to Green Tea. Just enough of a prod. The problem with Coffee is it's a big hit and the subsequent sips provide a declining return on alertness, but an increase in fidgeting, anxiety, etc. A more modest dose from tea and I'm less likely to become accustomed to high levels of caffeine which only serve to keep me at a body-acclimated "normal".

        Coffee is great in small doses. The huge mugs that Americans favor and the super mega vente that most people buy at the coffee shop is way overkill. I found that coffee was making me edgy until a friend from Europe gave me a set of very nice small cups, maybe six ounces. If I have one of those in the morning, sitting on my back porch with the wife, it gets me off to a nice running start and doesn't keep me awake at night.

        After that, it's just herb tea or slivovitza. Once in a while a Yoohoo and Jagermeister over crushed ice, because the elk blood is good for my gout.

        This is the case - your first hit of coffee has more impact than any more you drink all day - rate of declining return - as your body acclimates to it and your cognitive self also makes subtle adjustments. Star*ucks is far too strong and I only get on gift cards when traveling, in the smallest cup size - even that will last more than one day.

      • Re:Simpler method (Score:5, Informative)

        by arth1 (260657) on Friday February 17, 2012 @01:44AM (#39071067) Homepage Journal

        The huge mugs that Americans favor and the super mega vente that most people buy at the coffee shop is way overkill. I found that coffee was making me edgy until a friend from Europe gave me a set of very nice small cups, maybe six ounces

        Keep in mind that Europeans drink stronger coffee than Americans.
        The recommended dosage for "ideal" coffee is 65-75 grams per liter in the US, and 75-90 grams per liter in Northern Europe.
        Add that most Americans prefer their coffee weaker than recommended[*] - one scoop per cup is common, which translates to 4 scoops per quart, whereas in e.g. Norway, the recommendation is seven scoops per liter, plus "one for the kettle", or about 8 scoops per quart.

        So chances are that your European friends get as much if not more caffeine from one small cup of coffee than what you'd get from a large 20 oz Starbucks.

        [*] In part, I believe, because Americans drink more central and South American coffee high in organic acids, while Europeans drink more African coffee, higher in inorganic acids. With American roasts also being lighter and thus more acidic, it helps explain why the coffee is brewed weaker - few people would like to drink sour coffee. In comparison, a typical European coffee would taste less acidic but more bitter.

        • Keep in mind that Europeans drink stronger coffee than Americans.

          Believe me, you just can't group Europeans like that. I'm Italian. I simply cannot drink what they call coffee in any northern country. Spaniards, Greeks and Turkish have interesting ways of preparing coffee too. Northern countries are very similar to Americans in their coffee habits.

          • by arth1 (260657)

            I'm Italian. I simply cannot drink what they call coffee in any northern country. [...] Northern countries are very similar to Americans in their coffee habits.

            And Italians are very similar to Americans in how little they know about the world outside their borders, lumping countries together.

            Brits drink weaker coffee, but they are not representative for Northern Europe.
            In Norway, people drink stronger coffee than in Italy, which in turn is stronger than American coffee. What Norwegians don't drink much of are the caffeine weak but strong tasting espresso and cappucino based coffees. I've lived in all three countries; I should know.

      • http://www.snopes.com/business/secret/jagermeister.asp [snopes.com]

        The Elk Blood is a myth. Jagermeister is a really nice drink, certainly one to try , it has a cult following round here.

        • http://www.snopes.com/business/secret/jagermeister.asp [snopes.com]

          The Elk Blood is a myth. Jagermeister is a really nice drink, certainly one to try , it has a cult following round here.

          Yup, "elk blood in Jägermeister" is a stupid myth, especially because there are no elks here in Germany :-)

        • by PopeRatzo (965947)

          The Elk Blood is a myth.

          You don't say, Amazing Randi.

          I was joking. I thought the Yoohoo would give it away. Maybe I should have added an olive to make it more obvious.

      • by fostware (551290)

        If you've been introduced to slivovitz, surely you've also been shown the first part of breakfast - turkish coffee...

        "Breakfast of Champions!"

        • by PopeRatzo (965947)

          If you've been introduced to slivovitz, surely you've also been shown the first part of breakfast - turkish coffee...

          My Belgrade-born wife calls it "Serbian coffee" but it's the same stuff. Boiled coffee you can practically chew.

          She makes it for me when she wants the house painted.

      • by ergean (582285)

        How on earth is six ounces small for a coffee?

        I usually drink one short espresso [istockimg.com] (one ounce cup) on my way to whatever takes me on the road.

    • Green tea is great, until you realize that it has about as much caffeine as some coffee.

      • by azalin (67640)
        And while coffee does give you a good strong strong kick it goes downhill after that. Tea on the other hand pushes more gentle but doesn't stop so quickly.
      • Green teas differ very much. Gyokuro can give you instant jiggles while lower grade sencha or gunpowder can be at almost decaf levels.

    • www.caffeineweb.com I was on Lithium for a supposed bipolar condition when the problem was a caffeine sensitivity. A big waste of a quarter century.
    • I appreciate what they're trying to do, but really, each person has their own caffeine profile and has to find where it works and where it doesn't.

      Very true. Whilst they can probably accurately model the caffeine absorption into the bloodstream, there are two factors that the app cannot know.

      1. Amount of caffeine per coffee. Whilst this is predictable with instant coffee, different coffee beans differ in the amount of caffeine in them. Percolators are not bad but if you drink espresso based drinks then the amount of caffeine per shot can vary by a factor of 8 (fineness of the grind, tamping, how the shot is pulled etc).
      2. Each person metabolises caffeine
  • by rebelwarlock (1319465) on Thursday February 16, 2012 @11:18PM (#39070049)
    Does it come with testing hardware so that it can determine precisely how strong your coffee is, and thus more accurately calculate your intake? Does it come with measuring tools to know how much you're pouring into your mug? How about accountability for the additional influence of sugar? What about people who have become desensitized to caffeine? There are too many factors they haven't considered, not least of which being how they're going to convince me to jam a needle in my liver so they can determine how well it's working.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Sheek88 (2572037)
      I agree that there are way too many variables to make a 'one size fits all' app. However, the issue of different tolerance levels was addressed in the last line of the post: "It also lets you change the 'optimal' and 'sleep' values if you're particularly resistant or weak to caffeine."
      • by arth1 (260657) on Thursday February 16, 2012 @11:59PM (#39070365) Homepage Journal

        I agree that there are way too many variables to make a 'one size fits all' app. However, the issue of different tolerance levels was addressed in the last line of the post: "It also lets you change the 'optimal' and 'sleep' values if you're particularly resistant or weak to caffeine."

        Does it allow for those of us who needs coffee to sleep?

        I grew up in a culture where 7 cups a day was average, which, when accounting for those who don't drink coffee, meant 10-12 cups a day for coffee drinkers. Often including a bedside mug. Then I moved to the US, where people have a belief that coffee can make them unable to sleep, and that's when drinking making-love-in-a-canoe coffee. I think it's at least partially psychosomatic - people get restless from coffee because they expect to, and because it's a pick-me-up in the morning, they believe it's also going to wake them up if drunk at night.
        Sure, caffeine is a stimulant, but American coffee has extremely low doses. The theobromine in a cup or bar of chocolate is more of a stimulant (never mind the sugar), and they don't seem to have the same belief about chocolate keeping them awake.

        Sure, I have probably built up a tolerance, but I didn't have any problem with coffee keeping me awake when I started drinking it either. About a pot of strong coffee a day during summer at age 14, and I slept like a log. Nobody told me I would have problems sleeping, so I didn't.

        • Yes. similarly, I have 5-10 cups of tea a day (Brit here - what ho!). It's not caffeine that keeps me awake. Nothing keeps me awake (other than class 'A's). Horses for courses, YMMV, my 2p etc etc..
        • by nprz (1210658)

          I didn't drink coffee until I finished college and started working. From middle school up until that time, I drank soda. I had my part-time job at a place giving out free soda, so I probably drank a gallon a day.
          Now that I'm on coffee, I have at least 6 cups a day to feel normal. Drinking it before going to sleep has no affect.

          Worrying about work and what-not would keep me awake, so I usually try to note down any brilliant ideas when lying in bed and that usually helps.

          I used to think the soda kept me up at

        • coloful phrasing (Score:5, Insightful)

          by KingAlanI (1270538) on Friday February 17, 2012 @02:49AM (#39071385) Homepage Journal

          making-love-in-a-canoe coffee.

          Hey, I thought that comment ("fucking close to water") applied to our beer, not our coffee. :P

          • I don't know where the GP is from but I could make a wild guess that it's one of the Nordic countries (Finland, Sweden, etc.) because of this list of countries by coffee consumption per capita [wikipedia.org].

            I keep hearing that American beer is too light and I have no reason to doubt that but let me assure you that Nordic beer is also crap. The local term is "Poronkusi", which translates to something like "Reindeer piss". (Of course, some microbreweries are exception but I'd guess that there are quite decent microbrewer

            • yeah, there are a bunch of decent microbreweries (and places that are large but not as large as Bud/Coors/Miller)
              I don't doubt that other countries have their share of bad beer.

              various other comments in this thread do mention those countries being big on consumption of strong coffee

          • by azalin (67640)
            The main reason Starbucks an the like flourished and hot this big, was that the ordinary coffee available in the US sucked (to put it mildly). Microbreweries seem work through a similar avenue.
            • by cusco (717999)
              Had a friend who went to college with Howard Shultz, CEO of Starbucks during its rise. A bunch of them were sitting in a boat on Puget Sound, getting stoned and talking about what they were going to do after graduation. Howard said, "I want to find a legal, addictive drug and market it to the world." Truly a man with a plan.
        • Caffeine is definitely not psychosomatic for me. I got sleeping problems from a caffeinated soda one time when I was a kid, before I knew what it was supposed to do to me.
    • Just by drinking a coffee with an empty stomach, or after a big meal, changes completely the caffeine effects. It is better to rely on one's own feelings, and learn day by day how one's own body reacts upon taking a specific coffee at this time, after lunch, after doing some sports etc...
    • Yes, you're absolutely right - there is no possibility that this app can/should be taken seriously. That it's being promoted as developed by 2 doctors is a more worrying issue (or would be, if I cared), as the more credulous members of society, with no self-control, will make the basic error of believing what it tells them.

      In practice it's just a bit of silliness for people who feel the need to justify the amount of coffee they drink. Hopefully the next version will link coffee intake with biorhythms - so

    • by Hadlock (143607)

      A standard cup of coffee/tea is about 100-110mg. Being a crop it can vary 10-15% in either direction from lot to lot, even the same brand/flavor. BMI has loopholes too (like body builders), but for many young people just entering the workplace, that giant pot of free coffee is enticing and this could really help a lot of people become more aware of how strong drugs like caffeine effect your body. Sure, you'd be better off with blood tests and a full suite of diagnostics, but like the food pyramid, I don't t

  • According to App store reviews the current version is buggy (it crashes a lot).

    Still I got it because it's FREE (well the lite version is) and it will hopefully be upgraded to fix its bugs. Since I drink coffee for my health (many studies have shown it to help prevent colon, liver and prostate cancers and other diseases as well as enhance athletic performance) I'd really like to keep track of consumption.

    • by Imagix (695350)
      It does. Tried to change the "sleep time" and kaboom. Not even something weird, just changing a normal setting.
    • by jockeys (753885)
      it's unusable. attempting to enter anything other than coffee or tea (no soda, really?) causes the app to crash on my unjailbroken phone.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    for(;;)
      { time_to_drink_coffee(); }

  • Excuse me, I need another double espresso to make it to bedtime. O_o

  • Subject says it all. Just an FYI.
  • by epp_b (944299) on Thursday February 16, 2012 @11:45PM (#39070241)

    I've already optimized my intake: it's 0.

    Honestly, why do people addict themselves to this crap? Stop eating McCrappers all the time, get some exercise and you might be surprised how much energy you have without caffeine. You'll feel a lot better, too, not being buzzed and strung out all the time.

    • It tastes so good, that's why i'm addicted. I'm constantly on and off coffee. I hate the caffeine but love the taste. I'm on decaf now but it tastes bad. What I don't get is people who need to add cream & sugar. Why not just drink soda at that point?
      • Don't mean to troll here but maybe decaf doesn't taste so good because as you swig, the caffeines not there to light the 'taste' up?
        • by Z34107 (925136)

          I wouldn't think so - caffeine by itself has a rather bitter taste. Energy drinks add tons of other crap as much for marketing as to work around it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          No, it's because decaf inherently tastes bad.

          Basically, when making coffee, the idea is to extract some chemicals from the coffee beans using hot water. Those chemicals are volatile organic compounds, for the most part. If you leave a coffee bean exposed to the air for a while (or a ground coffee bean exposed to the air for an hour), most of those chemicals will evaporate. The resulting coffee would taste terrible - much of what makes it taste like coffee would have evaporated.

          Something similar happens with

          • by EricWright (16803)

            It turns out that people aren't willing to pay any extra for decaf compared to regular coffee. Since the decaffeination process itself adds cost, the only way to sell decaf for the same price as regular coffee is to use lower quality (cheaper) coffee beans. So now you're taking bad coffee, and making it worse. Aside from which, if you're producing coffee beans, why would you take the best you have and ruin it, when you could sell it as-is for a much higher price?

            This is the exact reason I've heard from many

        • It's actually in the roasting and processes used to make decaf. For one thing, it's almost universally roasted so dark that it's basically burnt, and becomes extremely bitter. The lighter and medium roasts that have the more mellow flavours actually have the highest caffeine content.

      • by Osgeld (1900440)

        I could not stomach the taste of coffee for years, it would make me gag ... one day I tried some decent stuff black, and now I have no problem with it, though I still rarely drink it

    • Ssssshhhutttttt uppppp, youuuu faggggottttttttt. Cofffffeeeeeeeeee isssss perrrfecccctttlyyyy saffffffeeeeee. Hhhheeeeeeelllllpppsssssss witttthhh conconconcennntrationnn and typping.

      What?

    • by WiiVault (1039946)
      A big difference is that caffeine is naturally occurring in lots of plants and not a major health negative especially as far as stimulants go. On the other hand only my kids believe that there is a McNugget tree in the wild despite my best efforts to avoid that shit.
      • by ceoyoyo (59147)

        Caffeine is naturally occurring in lots of plants as an insecticide.

        • by WiiVault (1039946)
          Fair, but chocolate is toxic to dogs. Yet to me it is yummy as hell, and some argue has positive health properties in moderation. Humans and insects are quite different by most measures.
          • by ceoyoyo (59147)

            My point was that "[it's] naturally occurring in lots of plants" is completely irrelevant to how safe or beneficial something is. Caffeine is toxic to humans, we just don't normally approach potentially fatal doses. Theobromine, the caffeine relative in chocolate, is also toxic. Caffeine, for example, is about 1/3 as toxic as antifreeze, and about half as toxic as the organophosphate pesticide diazinon.

            It's tough to kill yourself drinking coffee, but you certainly can with more concentrated caffeine sour

          • by pclminion (145572)

            Fair, but chocolate is toxic to dogs.

            Because it contains theobromine, which is very closely related to caffeine...

    • I've already optimized my intake: it's 0.

      Honestly, why do people addict themselves to this crap? Stop eating McCrappers all the time, get some exercise and you might be surprised how much energy you have without caffeine. You'll feel a lot better, too, not being buzzed and strung out all the time.

      You sound really irritated and snappish - a cup of coffee might help soothe your nerves.

  • Careful, it might keep you up all night until they work out the bugs!

    Medium Coffee at 7am

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Medium Coffee at 8am

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Medium Coffee at 9am

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Large Coffee at 10am

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Take HUGE Piss

    Giant Coffee at 11am

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Giant Coffee at 12pm

    App Check >> DRINK MORE COFFEE!

    Another HUGE Piss, skip lunch

    Full pot of Coffee at 1pm

    App CHECK >

    • by arth1 (260657)

      Go into coffee induced mild coma at 2pm

      After just 7 cups? Hardly. That's about the average coffee consumption in Scandinavian countries, when the average includes those who don't drink coffee at all.

      It's just coffee - it's not like you're downing wellbutrin or ritalin.

      It's not as bad a drug as you might think - disregard "studies" done or sponsored by Loma Linda (adventists) or BYU (mormons) who have a religious agenda against coffee, and you'll find little to indicate that it's all that bad for you in moderation.

  • when there is too much blood in my vein.
  • by utkonos (2104836) on Friday February 17, 2012 @12:02AM (#39070383)
    I've never drank coffee on a regular basis. I've drank maybe under 100 cups of coffee total in my entire life. I've never had a problem with drowsiness or alertness. I get a good amount of sleep at night and decent exercise. This is all you need.
    • by WiiVault (1039946)
      I would argue the majority of people drink coffee and tea for the taste and caffeine is just part of the deal or a perk for some. There are just so many better ways to get jacked-up on caffeine if that is the sole goal. I too don't drink coffee, but love a nice Earl Grey every now and then.
  • that's easy,

    just a screen that says

    DRINK COFFEE NOW

    there..optimized.

    the paid version adds a -beep- every three seconds to remind you to take sip

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Caffeine is a drug that's sadly overused to the max. Surely, the best thing must be to avoid taking caffeine at all? It's really mind boggling how our culture nurtures it to the point that they now talk about "optimum caffeine level" in your blood. Wow, just..wow.

  • How to fine tune your caffeine dosage. So what's wrong with that? I hope that sells and they make lots of money. Then I hope I can buy stock in their corporation just at the right time, and get rich too.

    I love America. It's full of Americans that sell shit I choose to buy. So much better than the alternatives...

  • by Hermanas (1665329) on Friday February 17, 2012 @03:24AM (#39071515)

    ...that can keep me at the Ballmer peak [xkcd.com]? Now THAT would be useful.

  • I drank my last one then and haven't touched it since. I know some people it's ok for, however like most drugs they affect people in different ways.

    Some drinkers get merry, happy and have a good time, others want to beat people up.
    Coffee makes me an addict, takes my energy away, wrecks my sleeping patterns and is generally not a good thing to go near.

    I have weak jasmine tea now, awesome drink, much better - can sip at it all day from a thermos as if I'm in a Vietnamese resteraunt.

  • Don't drink it regularly... (note that I did not say "don't drink it EVER... it will kill ya... coffee's bad" etc. etc.)

    It's not witchcraft, people: coffee is a drug (a reasonably mild one at that), like many drugs your body builds a tolerance to it real fast. The more you drink it, the less effective it is, up until the point where your hourly cup barely keeps you at baseline wakefulness (kinda like crack, really, but much cheaper). I could quote you a gazilion studies on that, but I'm pretty sure you a
  • Cute french animation regarding the subject of the article: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sILvmyNGAI [youtube.com]
  • by assertation (1255714) on Friday February 17, 2012 @11:26AM (#39074609)

    Asians figured this out centuries ago.

    The drink green tea, getting a health boost with their caffeine, instead of the bone rotting chemicals in soda.

    The drink it hot so they don't guzzle it and get swamped in caffiene and they drink it out of tiny tea cups through out the day giving themselves a steady burn without a crash.

  • by pclminion (145572) on Friday February 17, 2012 @12:31PM (#39075489)

    I gave up caffeine purely on a whim about a month ago, and I cannot express how much BETTER my life is. I'm less nervous, I fidget less, I fall asleep earlier and wake up earlier. My appetite is more regular.

    Do you have any idea how awesome it feels to fall asleep because you're sleepy (not because you know you have to), and to wake up because you've slept enough and not have to immediately start pouring more caffeine into the bloodstream just in order to function? It was a fucking miracle.

  • I looked up info on caffeine. Takes about one hour to go into your system and it has about a 5 hour half life. I put this into spreadsheet and found that a simple rule is drink x amount of coffee to start the day then 1/2 x in three hours and another 1/2 x in three more hours. This will keep your caffeine level pretty constant and it will decay to about 15% of x by the time you go to sleep. There is quite a bit of variation with different people so this is only a starting point.

    • by pclminion (145572)
      I would think that because of diffusion the rate of uptake of caffeine into the bloodstream is a function of concentration, so the "one hour to go into your system" rule seems pretty crude, you would need to account for what the actual value 'x' is, and whether it's in the form of two liters of Coke vs. a quad shot espresso.
  • Does anyone know where did they get their parameters? From which studies / white papers exactly? I for one would be thrilled to port this to some other platforms if anyone could give me some pointers to relevant studies.

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