Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Science

Periodic Table To Welcome Two New Elements 157

Posted by Soulskill
from the spellchecker-database-grows-by-two dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "Chemistry's periodic table can soon welcome livermorium and flerovium, two newly named elements, which were announced Thursday (Dec. 1) by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. The new names will undergo a five-month public comment period before the official paperwork gets processed and they show up on the table. Three other new elements just recently finished this process, filling in the 110, 111 and 112 spots."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Periodic Table To Welcome Two New Elements

Comments Filter:
  • by cashman73 (855518) on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:31PM (#38242600) Journal
    Will they ever name an element Colbertium, after Stephen T. Colbert, DFA?
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Anything but that!

    • What were the scientists thinking? Maybe they got so consistently drunk they named it in memory of their formerly healthy organs?
      • by Anonymous Coward

        What were the scientists thinking?

        I bet they were thinking, "Hey let's name it after the town [llnl.gov] in which we work.

    • Is flerovium some breed of onion?

      • by ackthpt (218170)

        Is flerovium some breed of onion?

        Sounds like the latest artificial sweetner or food additive .. but I'm being culturally insensitive.

        Do these people ever have fun? How about Unobtanium?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:34PM (#38242642)

    I have a number of people to coordinate in order to make sure it ends up with the name Elerium.

    • I'll join your quest to make element 115 Elerium.

      Personally though, I'm looking forward to Unobtainium becoming official.

  • by raydobbs (99133) on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:35PM (#38242670) Homepage Journal

    Were these stable elements - or did they exist as a product of some super-collision for fractions of a second?

    • by eric_brissette (778634) on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:40PM (#38242736)

      FTA - "All five of these elements are so large and unstable they can be made only in the lab, and they fall apart into other elements very quickly. Not much is known about these elements, since they aren't stable enough to do experiments on and are not found in nature."

      • by nitefallz (221624)

        By this definition aren't, how can they be classified as elements? Growing up, and being taught in school "elements cannot be broken down any further." If these elements are breaking down into other elements..wtf?

        • by nitefallz (221624)

          Wow I mangled that post. Why isn't my brain functioning today?

        • by Obfuscant (592200)

          Growing up, and being taught in school "elements cannot be broken down any further." If these elements are breaking down into other elements..wtf?

          By that definition, there are no elements other than hydrogen. Any atom can be split, given enough energy, into atoms of other elements, except for the proton, which can be pulverized, but the products are not another element.

          Otherwise, I would agree. Any element with a half-life so short should be considered an intermediate reaction product, not an element.

        • by nedlohs (1335013)

          Uranium does this too (over ever so slightly larger time scales...) - it is not an element?

        • Short answer: your elementary education was wrong.

        • by Bucky24 (1943328)
          Take for example nuclear fission, a process that involves an unstable isotope breaking down into another element (possibly also an unstable isotope). Likely the only isotopes of these elements they have been able to make so far are extremely unstable. However "breaking down" isn't really a good term to use. Better would be "becoming a smaller element by losing pieces of itself" but that's long.
        • "Elements cannot be broken down any further." Which is true but only half the story. "Because if they do, then they become something else." is the other half of the story.

          These gigantic atoms are unstable. You can make them but they quickly fall apart into the things they were made of. Like a house of cards in a windy room.

          The research teams are taking large atoms and firing them at other large atoms to make these gigantic atoms. They only last for a few moments before they fall back apart into the

        • by LWATCDR (28044)

          When did you go to school? The 1800s?

        • by Daniel Dvorkin (106857) on Friday December 02, 2011 @05:58PM (#38245022) Homepage Journal

          Growing up, and being taught in school "elements cannot be broken down any further."

          It's always nice to run into a fellow member of the Class of 1827 here on /.

        • by dissy (172727)

          By this definition aren't, how can they be classified as elements? Growing up, and being taught in school "elements cannot be broken down any further." If these elements are breaking down into other elements..wtf?

          What school was this? And in what country?

          Protons and Electrons were discovered just before the year 1900, by Ernest Rutherford.
          Neutrons were theorized then discovered two and three decades later respectively.

          As long ago as 1945 was the first nuclear warhead testing detonation, which pretty much proved beyond any shadow of a doubt that atoms of elements can be split into smaller things. It made a news paper or two I think.

          Anyone attempting to claim otherwise (Your school and teacher(s) included) is so emb

      • I wish I lived on an island of stability.
        • by Darinbob (1142669)

          Trouble is the ferry comes only one a week to that island and internet service is dial up only and they inhabitants have their own variant of burning man.

    • The longest lived isotopes stay around for seconds.

    • by Brett Buck (811747) on Friday December 02, 2011 @04:12PM (#38243278)

      An element is defined by the number of protons in the nucleus. Not by the number of protons in the nucleus that happen to stay together for a "long time (TBR)".

  • by eegad (588763) on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:36PM (#38242692)

    this table is updated periodically.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Red Flayer (890720)
      Well, to be pedantic, it's not updated periodically -- that would imply that it gets updated on a regular basis with a predictable cycle. It's updated sporadically.

      To be more specific, the periodic table can be thought of as a fungus. The elements are the mycelia of the fungus, and once in a while the table produces fruiting bodies (like mushrooms) that will produce spores for the periodic table to reproduce. It is these fruiting bodies that are the new elements. The spores will be released from these
      • by Aryden (1872756)
        To be more pedantic:

        repeated at irregular intervals; intermittent: periodic outbreaks of the disease.

        Link [reference.com]

        • 1. Your link has no definition for periodic (not sure if that was the case when you posted it).

          2. the definition you quote is down the list of accepted definitions. Especially for mathematic and scientific use, periodic means "happening or appearing at regular intervals". The general definition is

          periodic (pîr-dk) adj.
          1. Having or marked by repeated cycles.
          2. Happening or appearing at regular intervals.
          3. Recurring or reappearing from time to time; intermittent.
          4. Characterized by periodic sent

      • by Nationless (2123580) on Friday December 02, 2011 @04:19PM (#38243396)

        I imagine renaming it the sporadic table of the elements wouldn't go down too well with the academics.

      • by mr1911 (1942298) on Friday December 02, 2011 @04:29PM (#38243552)

        Well, to be pedantic, it's not updated periodically -- that would imply that it gets updated on a regular basis with a predictable cycle. It's updated sporadically.

        To be more specific, the periodic table can be thought of as a fungus. The elements are the mycelia of the fungus, and once in a while the table produces fruiting bodies (like mushrooms) that will produce spores for the periodic table to reproduce. It is these fruiting bodies that are the new elements. The spores will be released from these new elements when moisture and temperature conditions are right -- and with luck, a given spore may land upon the wall of another elementary school classroom and become a new periodic table of the elements.

        Yet he still doesn't know why he isn't invited to parties.

  • Livermorium, holy yuk! That's worse than Moland Springs [tv sitcom reference]
    • by Obfuscant (592200)

      Livermorium, holy yuk!

      Especially when I first read that as "liverandonionium".

  • i was going to try some biotic implants

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Element 0 (neutron, no protons) is unstable with a half-life of approximately 10 mnutes.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I Lv U?

    (slightly radioactive)

  • by idontgno (624372) on Friday December 02, 2011 @03:49PM (#38242868) Journal
    Atomic number 115 still hasn't been named (or confirmed, according to TFA), but I know what it should be named when the time comes. [ufopaedia.org]
    • by Anonymous Coward
      I'll go with NetCraftConfirmium for that element 115. Why not? Makes as much sense as the other ones. I don't know why they come up with these lame names anyway. Look at the older elements on the chart. Gold. Silver. Oxygen. Xenon. No "whateverium" garbage. Just names. Maybe we should call the next one "Bob" just to get out of the naming doldrums.
      • by blueg3 (192743)

        The first part is named after a person or place of scientific significance, usually in the field of particle physics.

        The -ium ending is pretty common for elements. Just look at some of the older entries on the periodic table, as you recommended: helium, lithium, beryllium, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, gallium, germanium, selenium, rubidium, strontium, zirconium, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, iridium, platinum.

  • When is that going to get added? Hmm?
  • Make 'em name of them Spunk.
  • .... livermorium and onionium.

  • by Murdoch5 (1563847)
    Wont every school now have to replace there periodic tables with the new updated version?
    • ..You just made next year's college chemistry students have to buy a new edition of the textbook. College books might just be affordable if people would just stop learning new things.
    • by Bucky24 (1943328)
      And with the budget cuts too... Won't someone think of the children?
  • I don't like liver. Can we call it "Liverlessium" instead?

  • Chemistry's periodic table can soon welcome livermorium and flerovium, two newly named elements

    Welcome welcome! Would you like some Ti?

  • by bryan1945 (301828) on Friday December 02, 2011 @04:29PM (#38243556) Journal

    Always trying to take out Bond(s).

  • "the element that cannot be named" ?
  • by Maltheus (248271) on Friday December 02, 2011 @04:48PM (#38243908)

    ...so long as Plutonium remains classified an element.

  • Anyone else think they sound like made-up names from really bad science fictions movies?
  • I'm waiting for the magical, life-changing element #125, that should either be called Protonite, or Magicium -- because it will be.

  • I wonder how he will capture these elements for his table
  • They need to include morecowbellium. How could they forget this lightweight, metallic element, which could be used to produce one of the most pleasant should in all the multiverse.

     

  • I wonder if Adobe will object over the appropriation of their trademarked [Fl] icon by the periodic table?

Nothing happens.

Working...