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Medicine

HIV Vaccine Trial Shows 90% Immune Response 386

Posted by samzenpus
from the cure-is-near dept.
fergus07 writes "Researchers at the Spanish Superior Scientific Research Council (CSIC) have successfully completed Phase I human clinical trials of a HIV vaccine in which 90% of volunteers developed an immunological response against the virus. The MVA-B vaccine draws on the natural capabilities of the human immune system and 'has proven to be as powerful as any other vaccine currently being studied, or even more,' says Mariano Esteban, head researcher from CSIC's National Biotech Centre."
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HIV Vaccine Trial Shows 90% Immune Response

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  • awesome (Score:5, Funny)

    by rish87 (2460742) on Wednesday September 28, 2011 @03:20PM (#37545178)
    I can finally go back to sharing needles. I gotta save money, what with the economy in the gutter.
  • "The MVA-B vaccine draws on the natural capabilities of the human immune system"

    Isn't that how *all* vaccines work?

  • by Tumbleweed (3706) * on Wednesday September 28, 2011 @03:24PM (#37545276)

    Oh yeah, they never did cure Herpes, did they? :(

    • by vlm (69642)

      Oh yeah, they never did cure Herpes, did they? :(

      Too profitable.

      Imagine the crushing damage to the medical industry if they ever cured the common cold?

    • by RenHoek (101570)

      To be honest.. once they've tackled HIV, if they start refocusing on the lesser STD's, I wonder if they'll just fall like a house of cards. I mean HIV is pretty advanced. It shouldn't be too hard to take out the remain ones should it? Or am I being too naive?

      • by medv4380 (1604309)
        Naive, herpes [wikipedia.org] hides in nerve cells between breakouts. I'm sure if you trained the immune system to hunt it down in those cells their would be other consequences. Your immune system deals with it just fine when it finds it, but killing nerve cells is usually bad. This is also why the 1st outbreak is usually the worst with Herpes since once you're body know what it is it can kill it before it causes too much damage, but depending on the version it still causes damage.
    • by Belial6 (794905)
      Which makes me suspicious. The can make a vaccine for the variant of Herpes (Chicken Pox) that has one outbreak, and that is the end of it, but they can't make a vaccine for the variant that has reoccurring outbreaks for the the persons entire life. For that variant, they can only come up with on going treatment to suppress the symptoms.
      • by afidel (530433)
        Actually the Herpes virus (varicella zoster) that causes chicken pox does have recurrence in many people, it's what causes shingles. For those people all they can do is help the symptoms as well (though the chicken pox vaccine will now eliminates symptoms for some significant percentage of those so affected). Now that the Valtrex patent has expired (2008) I'm sure there's some incentive to create a vaccine (though getting it used in the general population is going to be difficult, see all the ignorant uproa
      • by medv4380 (1604309)
        Actually even though you only get Chicken Pox once the virus can reinfect and then it's called Shingles [webmd.com]. The Chicken Pox Vacinne does not stop the potential of reinfection resulting in Shingles [about.com].
      • by samkass (174571)

        Which makes me suspicious. The can make a vaccine for the variant of Herpes (Chicken Pox) that has one outbreak, and that is the end of it, but they can't make a vaccine for the variant that has reoccurring outbreaks for the the persons entire life. For that variant, they can only come up with on going treatment to suppress the symptoms.

        Think about it... The vaccine works the same way actually getting Chicken Pox works from the immune system's memory's point of view. The fact that you tend to only get chicken pox a few times in your life (if you include shingles) is why there can be so effective a vaccine. The fact that the immune system can't keep some other herpes in check as well is why a vaccine is less effective for those variants.

        • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Wednesday September 28, 2011 @04:46PM (#37546522)

          Vaccines against viruses work because they train the immune system to attack the virus. They introduce something that gets it going. Can be a dead virus, can be a live but weakened virus, but whatever the case it trips off the immune system which produces a tailor made response. The immune system can then use that to kill any future invasions from that virus.

          This is the same thing that happens when someone gets sick. However in that case, the live (in so far as a virus is alive) and fully active so it overwhelms the body for awhile until the body can formulate the response and fight back. All the vaccine does is make that process easier and safer.

          The flip side of that is if it is the sort of thing the immune system fights off, but then it comes back, well a vaccine won't work, at least not a vaccine in the classical sense. If the immune system can't develop an effective repeating method to kill the virus, then a vaccine won't help.

          Really this shit is not a big medical conspiracy, it is just how things work. What's more, the more things we cure, the harder the things are that remain. We fixed the things that were easy to fix long ago. We are getting to the hard shit now.

  • I wonder if a vaccine against AIDS will result in a sexual revolution as happened in the '60s with the advent of birth control pills.

    And yes, I do know there's more then one STD out there, but that didn't stop them in the 60's either.

    • Probably not.
      Most people realized that people do want relationships more then just blind sex for most people.
      AIDS didn't put a stop to it. It was on its way out before AIDS but AIDS did give the opponents extra reasons.

       

      • Most people realized that people do want relationships more then just blind sex

        if by 'most people' you mean female yes. Most men still want random gratuitous sex as often as they can get it for the better part of their teens and 20s. It's genetic mostly but also nicely reinforced by societal stereotypes.

    • I'm sure there will be some affect on behavior.

      What I believe will *really* launch the next sexual bonanza is a simple 5 minute 'blood test on a chip' for the various STDs. Don't have to cure it, just know if the person you're going to humpty-hump with is likely clean.

      And that really can't be that far off in the future me thinks. Testing for the existence of a disease is infinitely simpler than curing it.
  • by hyades1 (1149581) <hyades1@hotmail.com> on Wednesday September 28, 2011 @03:33PM (#37545450)

    Looks like the big, homophobic Guy in the Sky takes another one in the 'nads from our friends in the medical research community.

    I wonder what Pat Robinson's got to say about this. He's been remarkably quiet since all those tornadoes ripped through the Bible Belt, sucking up true believers like a vaccuum cleaner on meth.

  • I guess they finally managed to cram the required shit-ton of money into a single syringe.
  • by Guppy (12314) on Wednesday September 28, 2011 @04:19PM (#37546212)

    HIV vaccine in which 90% of volunteers developed an immunological response against the virus.

    This is an absolutely meaningless measure; seroconversion against HIV is easy to achieve, and typically worthless. The elicited antibodies end up being targeted to highly variable regions, and have little long-term neutralizing power.

    Although a handful of unusual broadly neutralizing antibodies have been found among "elite controllers", it is extremely rare for typical individuals to generate them. There's been some speculation it might be possible to create an effective vaccine by directing the response away from decoy regions, and towards the handful of areas targeted by such elite antibodies. Thus far, nobody has managed such a feat, unfortunately.

  • Just because an immune response in the form of circulating antibodies from B cells is seen does not mean infection and replication will not occur when a person is exposed to HIV; most people with HIV have high levels of HIV antibodies circulating in their blood, but the rate at which the virus mutates, as well as the fact that the epitopes the body naturally develops immune responses to are "hidden" by the way in which the viral capsular proteins are folded means that the antibodies do little if anything to

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