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Canada Moon NASA Robotics Space Science

Students Win NASA Moon Robot Competition 28

Posted by Soulskill
from the soon-the-lunar-invasion-will-be-ready dept.
Mikkeles writes "After a grueling five-day test of material-collecting ability, the team from Laurentian University returned home to Sudbury, Canada with the win in NASA's second annual Lunabotics competition. Second place went to North Dakota, and West Virginia University placed third."
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Students Win NASA Moon Robot Competition

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  • by The Yuckinator (898499) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:54PM (#36337490)

    What's the point of posting if you're going to post a deliberately misleading link? Here's the full paragraph from Wikipedia without your omission:

    During the Apollo manned lunar exploration program, NASA astronauts trained in Sudbury to become familiar with shatter cones, a rare rock formation connected with meteorite impacts. However, the popular misconception that they were visiting Sudbury because it purportedly resembled the lifeless surface of the moon dogged the city for years—as recently as 2009, a CBC Radio journalist repeated the moonscape myth in a report aired on The Current,[21] although the show subsequently corrected the error by interviewing NASA astronaut Fred Haise, who confirmed that he had been in Sudbury to study rock formations.[22]

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @02:08PM (#36337562)

    Yes. Typical journalism confusion. It's not the surface terrain that's "like the moon", it's the underlying geology in the bedrock -- i.e. Sudbury is located within a large, deeply eroded impact crater [wikipedia.org]. It's the second largest known on Earth, and thus a logical place to send astronauts to study the geology.

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