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NASA Science

NASA Announces Final Homes of Shuttle Fleet 195

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the new-york-just-got-cooler dept.
PyroMosh writes "NASA administrator Charles Bolden just announced the final homes for the four remaining Space Shuttle Orbiters in a ceremony at Kennedy Space Center today commemorating the 30th anniversary of the first Shuttle launch. The Shuttle Atlantis will remain at NASA's home of Shuttle Launch operations — Kennedy Space Center. Endeavour will be displayed at the California Science Center in Los Angeles, just miles from where she was assembled. Discovery will be moved to the Smithsonian's Udvar-Hazy Air and Space Museum in Virginia outside of Washington DC — the very hangar that Enterprise now occupies. Finally, the Shuttle airframe prototype Enterprise will be moved from her current home to the U.S.S. Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum in New York City."
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NASA Announces Final Homes of Shuttle Fleet

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  • Bittersweet... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by nebaz (453974) on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @03:11PM (#35797648)

    It's good that we have a museum to put these historic artifacts into, but I would prefer that we have something to replace them with. That feeling is more intense when I see either a Saturn V or a LEM at one of the museums.

    • by jd (1658)

      We're lucky to have those in museums. The only "complete" Saturn V was left out in the rain with zero protection and zero maintenance. It is getting a major overhaul now, but we nearly lost irreplaceable history there. (Next time someone in the US says that it has less history than other countries, stop and consider how close we came to losing one of the most significant pieces in the 20th century. Then consider how much has indeed been lost through negligence or lack of resources. Then consider slapping th

      • Re:Bittersweet... (Score:4, Insightful)

        by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @04:19PM (#35798622)

        Sadly, it costs money to preserve. And politicians don't like to give money to projects unless they can get some present-day political mileage out of them.

        • by jd (1658)

          So very true and so very problematical.

        • by vlm (69642)

          Sadly, it costs money to preserve. And politicians don't like to give money to projects unless they can get some present-day political mileage out of them.

          Hire 50 guys from 50 different states to each do a tiny little bit of the restoration work. Thats how business is done, at least in the senate. Getting it thru the house requires somewhat more contractors of course.

      • by jburroug (45317)

        We're lucky to have those in museums. The only "complete" Saturn V was left out in the rain with zero protection and zero maintenance. It is getting a major overhaul now, but we nearly lost irreplaceable history there. (Next time someone in the US says that it has less history than other countries, stop and consider how close we came to losing one of the most significant pieces in the 20th century. Then consider how much has indeed been lost through negligence or lack of resources. Then consider slapping the person because it's in believing there's nothing historically important that there's so very little historically important left.)

        Which is probably why Houston didn't get one of the retired shuttles or the Enterprise. JSC does indeed play an important role in manned spaceflight operations but Space Center Houston is a bit sad compared the Air and Space Museum or Kennedy Space Center. When I first moved down here - please someone help me escape! - I was shocked to see the Saturn V just sitting out by the side of the road falling apart. It's in better shape now but the hangar they built for it looks like a very large pre-fab "Tuff Shed"

      • I really, really hope Atlantis ends up inside a structure that's at least as strong as my house (confession: reinforced concrete, including the roof and second floor suspended slab, with 80mph large-missile impact-glass windows), and not on a display stand like a statue out in the open. In case anybody's forgotten, about 12 years ago (give or take) the entire east coast of Florida almost got shredded like grass under a weedeater by Hurricane Floyd (a huge category 4 hurricane whose strongest winds missed Fl

    • by Nyeerrmm (940927)

      Boeing CST-100, Lockheed Orion, SpaceX Dragon, and Sierra Nevada DreamChaser.

      Not only are we replacing it, we're getting multiple options so a catastrophic failure on one doesn't ground us.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @03:16PM (#35797716)

    The Enterprise should go to San Fransisco. Future Starfleet Academy Cadets could use it for training & simulations.

  • by WiglyWorm (1139035) on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @03:19PM (#35797732) Homepage

    NASA needs to be given autonomy... they need to be given a long term goal (a generic one like "set up a moon colony as a dry run for a mars colony, then get to Mars", or "set up a mining outpost in the asteroid belt") and then left alone to decide the best way to achieve that. Having every president wanting to leave their mark on outer space like Kenedy did is irresponsible and leaves them with ever changing goals and a rotating set of tools to do the job. We've changed what vehicles they're supposed to be using two or three times now since they declared the end of the space shuttle. At this rate, an American vessel may never lift an astronaut in to space again. That's not even bringing congressional funding issues in to the mix...

    • by jd (1658)

      I'd suggest something akin to the Charter system that the BBC in the UK operates under: freedom to do what the hell they like with such-and-such as the objective of the charter, no Governmental interference (other than charter renewal), none of the restrictions Government departments would normally operate under (such as copyright and patent restrictions, civil service rules, etc etc) and the right to hire the top brass without imposition of a selected appointee.

      This system of a para-public organization (a

    • by Chris Burke (6130)

      Having every president wanting to leave their mark on outer space like Kenedy did is irresponsible and leaves them with ever changing goals and a rotating set of tools to do the job. We've changed what vehicles they're supposed to be using two or three times now since they declared the end of the space shuttle.

      Solution: Instead of trying to "leave their mark" by creating an immensely difficult goal that requires tons of task-specific development and a huge vehicle to accomplish in the time allotted (and then gets canned with nothing to show for it), instead develop a large number of more manageable and general purpose capabilities and technologies, that will make future missions easier.

      You know, what we're doing.

      At this rate, an American vessel may never lift an astronaut in to space again.

      Er, no, at this rate [wikipedia.org] we'll have an American vessel lifting astronauts to space in a few years.

      That's not even bringing congressional funding issues in to the mix...

      The big

    • by khallow (566160)

      NASA needs to be given autonomy...

      They aren't going to get it because they are a government agency. A public corporation or a non-profit might have sufficient independence to do as you say, depending what strings were attached to their funding. But that wouldn't be NASA, but an entirely new beast.

  • I *told* them I'd have my garage cleared out in time. Screw you, Bolden!

    That's the last time I buy hookers for a government official.

  • I was worried that the Enterprise's new home would be parked outside and exposed to the elements and harsh smog of NYC. Thankfully, from the artist renderings it looks like she'll be enclosed in a glass visitor's building.

  • The shuttle headed for NYC is supposed to sit on the pier next to the Intrepid currently occupied by a Concorde. I haven't seen yet what is supposed to happen to the Concorde... I would consider flying out to NYC to see those two aircraft in the same museum.
    • There's already a Concorde and a Space Shuttle (Enterprise) at the Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly Virginia. (As well as a ton of other aircraft. From Udvar-Hazy you can catch a shuttle that goes to the Smithsonian Air and Space museum in DC (I think you have to go to Dulles Airport, then to the Metro). http://www.nasm.si.edu/udvarhazy/ [si.edu]
      • by MightyYar (622222)

        They also have the Enola Gay and an SR-71. Very cool museum - well worth the trip out there if you are in the DC area.

        • by demonbug (309515)

          They also have the Enola Gay and an SR-71. Very cool museum - well worth the trip out there if you are in the DC area.

          Second that. It is an incredible museum. I remember being wowed by the Air and Space museum on the mall as a kid, then being a little disappointed when I went back as an adult. The Udvar-Hazy is the grown-up version of the Air and Space museum. Really an amazing, cavernous space filled with cool and interesting aircraft.

          • by Skater (41976)
            I love Udvar-Hazy. My wife and I had our first date there. :) But the Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio, and the Pima Air and Space Museum in Tucson, AZ are both must-sees too, if you haven't already and are interested in aircraft. If you haven't been to Dayton, imagine Udvar-Hazy 3 times larger... plus two additional hangars for Presidential and Experimental aircraft (Valkyrie, anyone?). Pima is huge and you can walk right up to the aircraft. They also give tours of the military boneyard next door. Ai
  • by BearRanger (945122) on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @03:51PM (#35798190)
    For the Museum of Flight's new space wing, which is pretty much finished, with an available space for a Shuttle. But instead the museum will be getting a full fuselage Shuttle trainer. In a way this is actually better. The Shuttle can't be touched. However visitors will be able to go inside the trainer. Just as every astronaut who has ever flown the Shuttle has done.
  • Should just fire one off in some random direction into deep space for the one in a googolplex chance of confusing the hell out of some ETs.
  • by CompMD (522020) on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @04:38PM (#35798934)

    deserved one more than NYC did.

  • The Air Force deserved to get one of the shuttles, even if it was the Enterprise. We still have the Apollo 15 CM, though - and that's something.
    • by Y-Crate (540566)

      The Air Force deserved to get one of the shuttles, even if it was the Enterprise. We still have the Apollo 15 CM, though - and that's something.

      The Air Force is the reason the design got compromised in the first place.

  • The feds have extended their middle finger to Texas. As much as I may feel for all those fine NASA folks in Houston (no, seriously...) this raises my MQ (mirth quotient) to new levels. Maybe now that state will have enough reason to actually act on their petulant, empty threats to secede. Please?
  • by GweeDo (127172) on Tuesday April 12, 2011 @05:51PM (#35799926) Homepage

    Ah, this will be the first NASA ship that won't be at the Cosmosphere. They have Mercury, Gemini and Apollo Capsules. They have a few Russian capsules (not sure which exactly). They have an actual Titan rocket even. To bad :(

  • Way to shit all over all the NASA employees in Houston by passing us over for New York City, a city that never played any role in the US space program. Yes, we have a Saturn V rocket, but we are also home to Mission Control and the fact that cities like Chicago and New York were even considered is an insult to all the hard work and dedication put forth by everyone at the JSC.

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