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Biotech Australia Science

Consumer Genetic Testing Available In Australia 88

Posted by samzenpus
from the giant-book-that's-hidden-inside-you dept.
Megaport writes "After the banning of direct-to-consumer genetic testing in Australia last July, new rules were imposed to require a physician to be involved in the process. Now a new Australian start-up, Lumigenix, has launched a genome decoding service for Australian (and global) consumers that meets the new regulatory requirements. Their products include genetic testing for health and ancestry information. The Australian government is planning to revisit the issue later this year and further regulation is anticipated in response to the emergence of direct-to-consumer genetic services."
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Consumer Genetic Testing Available In Australia

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  • by gmhowell (26755) <gmhowell@gmail.com> on Monday January 10, 2011 @03:17AM (#34820588) Homepage Journal

    Wonder how the false paternity rate is in Austrailia. I'm sure it's about to go down. Remember guys, genetic testing on day zero.

  • Moving goal posts (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Andy Smith (55346) on Monday January 10, 2011 @03:18AM (#34820594) Homepage

    Regardless of the ethics, controversy, or popularity of whatever is being regulated, regulation should, once set, remain largely unchanged. If the government sets out rules for business to operate, then a business following those rules -- not "working around" them -- should be able to continue trading. If the government then adjusts the regulatory rules, specifically to shut down certain businesses, those business should be able to claim compensation, which of course would come from our taxes. We may or may not like what a particular company is doing, but if we (via government) tell them it's okay to go ahead and start-up, we shouldn't set about shutting them down shortly after.

    What I'm trying to say is, governments shouldn't mess people around by giving them a set of rules and then changing the rules.

  • by gmhowell (26755) <gmhowell@gmail.com> on Monday January 10, 2011 @03:29AM (#34820632) Homepage Journal

    More inflexibility in government. I can't possibly see how that could go wrong.

  • Re:Employers (Score:4, Insightful)

    by laughingcoyote (762272) <barghesthowl@NospAm.excite.com> on Monday January 10, 2011 @03:37AM (#34820664) Journal

    Hrm. They made one of those things, called a "law", that's the initial subject of this article. I wonder if the Australian government could make another one of these "law" things to prohibit exactly that type of abuse and specify that no one is permitted to request that someone get genetic test results or favor those who provide them? Seems it'd be a good use for such a thing.

  • Re:Employers (Score:4, Insightful)

    by zblack_eagle (971870) on Monday January 10, 2011 @04:49AM (#34820884)

    Too bad we have universal healthcare here in Australia. Private health insurance is generally such bad value that it needs a 30% government rebate and the 1% extra tax if your income is above a certain threshhold if you don't get private coverage to make it somewhat 'competitive'.

  • Re:Employers (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Zouden (232738) on Monday January 10, 2011 @06:52AM (#34821378)

    That's only a concern in the US. In the rest of the developed world (including Australia), anyone can get health insurance regardless of their DNA. I genuinely feel sorry for you that your country has created a situation where your first thought about technology like this is how big companies will use it to screw you over.

    It's also illegal for employers to require genetic testing to screen applicants. I'm pretty sure that's illegal in the US as well, and there's nothing to indicate that will change. So I really don't know what the GP is basing his paranoia on.

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